Spotlight: Eternal Crimes – Dream Gag

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Once in a while, it feels like post-punk should be at the center of the universe. Unfortunately, there aren’t really many great post-punk bands out there. If there are, they’re usually getting more praise than they deserve, if you take away the roots they aren’t really standing on in the first place. Yes, most of them don’t really go full-on with inspiration from the roots of this great genre. There’s such a sensationalistic approach to it, as they try to modernize it beyond belief. But, there’s a band called Eternal Crimes whom have recorded their debut-album “Dream Gag“, which really takes you back to the time of our lives. It sounds like the primitive sound of 80’s post-punk, the sound which you enjoy throughout. Recognizable, in terms of the primitive and primal surge of baselines soaring through the landscape of smitten lives. Slow, but catchy riffs in a reverberated notion of a heavy and atmospheric baseline. Judging from their sound, they derive much from what’s been the best with post-punk as long as I’ve listened to the genre. I also realize that they’re modernistic in their approach, but their aim is not to stray away from the core – which many bands tend to do. When you slice a bit of the musical cake, you do also find a slab of new-wave goodness, amongst other things like their totally punched out crash-course in post-punk 101. Another thing that is good, is their experimental notion, which sends them into the avant-garde section of the genre as a whole. Incorporating a dark & noir feeling, but keeping the shadowy edges a little bit tidy, collapsing in on itself in an avalanche of sound that is lashed upon the greatness that is them. Do also throw in some slick indie pop-ish splendor, and you’ll have a weird family tree. Finally, something that can at least be considered worthwhile, when it comes to the general sound of an album. The lyrics are interesting and are at best a reminder of the wonderful eccentrics of Virgin Prunes, and the grandiose setting of Theatre of Hate, with The Birthday Party‘s total madnesscombined into a wonderful, triple symbiosis. No, they’re not the same, but you’re reminded once more of how much of a revitalization this genre needed to have. Eternal Crimes instantly fix this disparity and uphold the morality of what needs to be done – is to keep the core, but move in the outskirts of the territory. To never remove themselves completely from that particular region. Their album feature eight songs, and was released on the 6th of May by Bad Archer Records.

Invisible Guy recommends: 80s Gothic Rock – 1980-1981 (Part I)

I think it’s time to give you another treat, this time I’ll be recommending my favorite Gothic rock bands from the 80s. I begin with 1980-1981 (Part I) and then gradually move my way up throughout the years: 1982 (Part II), 1983-1984 (Part III), 1985 (Part IV), 1986-1987 (Part V) and 1988-1989 (Part VI). I’ll be continuing the fad of six different episodes and I’ll bid you my welcome into the world I knew and the world I’ve discovered and continually re-discover when I’m surfing the web. I want to give people another opportunity and to find out about bands and artists that they haven’t heard of before. Sometimes I occasionally sneak in a bigger band or two, but that’ll just be if the song is good enough. But by no means is this a top 30 of the best Gothic rock from the 80s, I’ll have to give you a top-10 list in the future of the Gothic bands that I think top my own list. I’ll also have some commentary beneath each clip as I had in the earlier parts that covered post-punk, mostly because it looks more aesthetically pleasuring and say something about the song or the lyrics. Let me take you into this world now.

You’re now entering Part I of the recommendation.

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