Interview with Ivan Antunovic of Small Doses!

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In Croatia we found Ivan Antunovic. Now, Ivan isn’t like everyone else. He has his own micro-label, does professional design work for a living, create music and also makes a fanzine. He’s been active in different groups in the Yugoslavian, now Balkan, underground. His alter-egos range from Half Releases to Innumerals, from his zine Small Doses to his designer-ego Nieuw NDG. This man has as many aliases as only he himself could know. Since a few years back he’s mainly been concentrating on releasing different singles and mini-albums alongside his fanzine. Even though the fanzine comes out every once in a while, he’s made a name for it through his proffesionality and originality when it comes to the design of the zine itself and all the macabre subjects which are disseminated within each number. He’s taken it from number one to number six – the last-mentioned due to be out in the very near future. I wanted to get the larger picture of what Ivan Antunovic actually does, how he copes with his egos, the climate in former Yugoslavia, his relationship with those he works with when doing the zine, the releases that are put out by him, his different projects before every alter-ego and many other things which you may find interesting.

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Spotlight: Various Artists – Transmission Barcelona – Second Anniversary

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Having put on a show with the first anniversary a year ago, of the monthly party in Barcelona called Transmission, which is a party dedicated to the international scene of post-punk, new-wave, cold wave and dark wave. Domestica Records return once again with the second anniversary of this party. The first compilation featured the following artists and groups: The KVB, Selofan, Paralelo, White Hex, Bonjour Tristesse, Ssleeping DesiresS, Crystal Soda Cream, Principe Valiente, Die Selektion, Lebanon Hanover, Chevalier Avant Garde, Police Des Moeurs, Petra Flurr + Modernista, Miserylab, Accident, Jewels Of The Nile, Fernand and Press Gang Metropol. Once again, the compilation is compiled by DJ Sandman – a long-going DJ since the 1980’s, that have played every notable club in Barcelona and Madrid by now – but also internationally at the Nachtwerk Club in Karlsruhe, and for having performed at the 17th edition of Wave Gotik Treffen Festival. As the last time, the artwork for this coming release have been created by Jordi Serrano, and the release itself has been mastered by Roger Cuixart. Interestingly enough, our favorites Női Kabát returns with a cover of an Associates-track called “Kitchen Person“. A fine new artist have also shown himself to be of much pleasure, namely Madmoizel, with his track “Come” – his first track since 2009.

This release will also feature contributions by Seacrypt, Phosphor, Des Âmes Libres, Schonwald, enigmatic group In Death It Ends, Más Allá, In A Lonely Place, and the lovely Xiu with her track “Dancing With You“. Last year the compilation which celebrated the first anniversary, featured more artists and groups, but even if that’s true – this second anniversary contain a lot of contributions that should be checked out. Virtually every track is priceless in one way or another, so it sounds really good having it comprised of only ten tracks. This also makes it less of a nuisance to listen through and every style imaginable is represented within the boundaries of electronica. It will be released on the 19th of May by Domestica Records. You can stream this release down below in full.

Review: Női Kabát – Make Room! Make Room!

a1212866862_10Női Kabát have been on the tapestry for a long time, and I am about to disseminate why this might be a classic with longevity, already. Their first release on aufnahme + wiedergabe, titled “Make Room! Make Room!” features two tracks which I’m going to delve into. I’ve listened to both for a long time and haven’t made up my mind if I really wanted to review it. But here it comes, nevertheless.

When you get into it for the first time, the title-track “Make Room! Make Room!” is the first one to loudly come into the picturesque urban sound-scape, with swirling synthesizers and determined drumming. A ravingly good thing is that they manage to set the mood for the track already in the beginning, as the introductory phase of the song isn’t a pain to listen to or get into. Everything seems to be carefully planned out and set in stone, as they move us into it with a groove that could seldom be heard anywhere – or anyhow – in a setting like this, as our modern world seem to have swallowed most of the retro-fantastic vibes they continually deliver in the introduction. Once the characteristics of the song begin to form themselves, they take the shape of a unimaginable synthesizer that sweeps the floor with my emotions. It’s like you’re being swept away by the callousness of the waves that pulsate through your eardrums, as each hit of the synthesizers magical keys seem to be done with ultimate passion. At the same time that it brings dismay to the table, it also brings an angelic touch that is affecting your own logical dissemination. The sound itself re-sounds through layers of drums, that are being assaulted with impudence. These blows that are delivered are perfectly matching the irreversibly tasteful harmonics that let you acknowledge the vibes that are roaring, throughout. When listening to it, you don’t notice the vocals all that much, as you are too enthralled by the environmentally sonic wonderland that is manifesting itself to the highest degree. But that does not take away the importance of Dee Rüsche, whom does an outstanding job at accompanying this perfected toxin that is simply moving outwardly towards you, lunging at you with the painful reminder of total urban decay.

His vocals are filled with passion, as he sinks his virtual teeth into you for a clinging bite that will absolve your cadaverous existence. He is the total reminder of what their quest seem to be, to remind us of what’s actually happening beside us at this moment. Well, it helps to actually know of this so called “mission“, if it actually is one. But one can read their almost apocalyptic turn in the song into this particular subject. It is pretty obvious what the influence might or might not be, but the emotions that this song bring forth in a human being is so remorseless that it isn’t even funny. If anything at all, this song is the pure anthem for Női Kabát. It is their shell, their core – if you will. The further you get into it, the more disgruntled you’d be. As the sonic landscape shift in between hard-hitting drums, fierce and uncontrollable synthesizers, into a more angelic and spiritual voyage that seems to be there to put you to sleep. Not because it is boring, but because every single nerve in your body is hurting. I can’t actually think of anything that is bad about this song, because everything is so perfected – yet so imperfect at the same time. A balance that is hard to actually allow oneself to follow, but I’d imagine that it would’ve taken time. One can actually, for once imagine – that it’s a mold that is not to be re-used once again. They’ve already done their best to shape it into what it’s become, a taste for music, at the same time a taste of reality. A reality I would like to be a part of. There’s no reason to not actually have this song on a list somewhere, maybe even a top-10. What they’ve done here is a reminder of what people should do more often; build up their own room in this world, so make room for Női Kabát.

As if something hasn’t been described enough, we must sadly depart from that wonderful song and make our way to “Industry“, which is the song on the B-side of this 7¨. It feels like it was a good idea to put this song on that side, because it is much harsher and lack a lot of what they delivered with the first song. It sounds like they’ve given up, which is frankly what they’re doing with this song. The metaphysics are colliding with the idea of themselves, which isn’t good at all, because the metaphysics is exactly what makes Női Kabát so great in the first place. But their approach here is more minimal and less bombastic, which takes away a lot from the mixture that could make the track a lot better. Even though it becomes more bombastic in the middle, as the chorus wails into place, it saves the song as such. The rest of it is just a pure mess which most of those that like the more minimalistic touches that they deliver, will froth over and defend to the last man. I actually abhor everything else on the track when I hear the spastic synthesizers coming in and the continual rhythm that is turned on, which makes me check my pulse, as it pulsates to the motion of “Industry“. But in no way can it match the first song on this 7¨, because a lot of their passion seemed to have went into the first song.

Even though some of the passion is returned in the end, it doesn’t make up for some of the wasted seconds that could’ve went into a more passionate landscape of sound. Somehow, it feels like they’ve inverted everything they once held true with the first track, like they’re rebelling against their self. Putting a megalomaniac at the helm, touching us a last time with their quirky synthesizer-laden mattress, telling us to fear not – because they will be back in one shape or another. If you view it as that, much of it makes even more sense. An experimental move to say “sayonara!“, as the ship is sinking into the wreck of humanity – as the oil is spilling over; as we ignite it. Though it has its moments, it doesn’t really recover, but the end is so incredibly alarming that even those of you that have no pulse, must be shaken to your knees. Which is certainly one of the other good parts about this song, but it doesn’t make it into my harbor, at least. I’d rather see the ship sinking with it’s captain, just so he can save the crew and fade away into the blurred ocean – with dignity. However you choose to view this release, it has already become a classic amongst a lot of people. It’s a shame that it hasn’t reached more people, because it has to. Whether you like it as a whole, or simply one song, it is a landmark for the electronic genre as such and music as a whole. Probably one of the best records released this year, even though some of it really doesn’t make it ashore. They’ve made their mark, which should honor them, and more people need to delve into it. Take it, or leave it – because it’s going to be your last chance.

Interview with Női Kabát!

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Photograph by: Cserkúti György

Női Kabát is one of the most interesting acts coming out of Europe in these times. It consists of three people, namely Dee Rüsche (Lungs / Metal), Owen Pratt (Synthesis / Noise) and Jonas Ranssøn (Simmons / Live Drums). One of the unique things that have shaped them is the fact that they’re situated in different cities. Considering the fact of how hard it is to keep something going, when you live so far away from each other. Yet, they’ve managed to strike the public with their immerse first release “Make Room! Make Room 7¨“, which was released by aufnahme + wiedergabe. It sold out very quickly. The music itself is bordering on synth-pop, new beat and cold wave – to name a few genres which have set root with them. Since people began to talk about them, revere them with kind words, they set out upon a Summer-tour in Europe. It’s when I came in to the picture. After reading a few interviews that had been conducted with them, learning a bit more about them, it felt like I missed something. Therefore, I decided to get in touch with them and do an interview with them. This is probably one of the more in-depth interviews out there, so I hope you learn something new and like what you’re reading. Or you might hate it, for all I know. But I did my best. In this interview, we get to know more about them personally, their influences, the origins of “Make Room! Make Room!” and much more. Get in line, read it up.

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Beläten and Invisible Guy presents: Shadow Rite – A Beläten Mixtape!

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Beläten have long been a proponent of Invisible Guy, or at least as long as we’ve been collaborating with each other. Thomas Ekelund is the head of this gargantuan Swedish label. It seems larger then it is, but it actually is what it seems. Invisible Guy have been a proponent of Beläten, since it’s one of the best and most exquisite labels today. It also makes me proud that it comes out of Sweden, my homestead. Earlier, he’s mixed the mixtape “Visions and Light“. This mixtape is the second one in these unofficial “series“. With 50% forthcoming material that’s going out on Beläten later this year, mixed with the majestic wonders of aufnahme + wiedergabe, La Forme Lente, Malignant Records and Avant!. With a great feature, which you’ll enjoy – a world premiere for a Trepaneringsritualen track, which will be out on Malignant Records later this year. Dance in the flaming pyre, embrace the rites of power, thrown into barren landscapes – is your ego being annihilated, in the Shadow Rite.

Invisible Guy and Beläten constitute some of the most powerful forces coming out of Sweden as we speak. Which brings me to introduce this collaboration with Beläten to you people, so that you can enjoy some exclusive songs from forthcoming releases. But do also enjoy those other songs that have been carefully selected to be featured in this mixtape. His legacy returns to my sphere once again, as his selection empowers the slumbering soul of the awaited Autumn. You will find the tracklist down below, links to Beläten and what ever you can and will find.

Shadow Rite – A Beläten Mixtape

01. Blitzkrieg Baby — Half Pig Half Man (Beläten, Forthcoming)
02. Feuerbahn — Triumphwagen (Aufnahme+Wiedergabe)
03. Dmitry Distant — System Control (Beläten, Forthcoming)
04. Michael Idehall — Snake Messiah [Distel Remix] (Beläten, Forthcoming)
05. L’Avenir — Falling Like The Snow II (Beläten, Forthcoming)
06. Makina GirGir — Oedipus Fin (La Forme Lente)
07. Női Kabát — Make Room! Make Room! (Aufnahme+Wiedergabe)
08. Grand Mal x — Tricks Of A Trade (Beläten, Forthcoming)
09. Sebastian Melmoth — Skurwysyn (Self-released, Beläten cassette forthcoming)
10. Distel — White Soldier (Beläten, Forthcoming)
11. Veil Of Light — Light (Beläten)
12. Lebabon Hanover — Gallowdance (Aufnahme+Wiedergabe)
13. Lakes — The Oldest Place (Avant!)
14. Trepaneringsritualen — Åkallan: Mímir (Excerpt) (Malignant, Forthcoming)
15. Carrion Sunflower — Wish For Death (Beläten, Forthcoming)

Beläten is looking forward to a hectic fall with great releases from Sutekh Hexen, Nordvall/Vainio, Grand Mal x, Dmitry Distant, Blitzkrieg Baby, Johan G. Winther, Distel, L’Avenir and Sebastian Melmoth, with even more epic plans for the year of 2014 e.v.

www.belaten.se | belaten.bigcartel.sewww.facebook.com/Belaten

Interview with Jen Ellerson of Modern Movement!

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Modern Movement is a project that was jumpstarted by Jen Ellerson, back in 2010. She wanted to capture a movement that she’d seen rising in Berlin, which was limited to eclectic and nocturnal sub-cultures within this specific region of Germany. Mainly ranging from cold wave to other obscure sounds. Those that are involved with the project, describe themselves as “a collective of ambitious, international misfits with irreproachable taste“. So, when this concept first set out to do something, it was by putting up club-nights that would fuse together the potential she saw in Berlin. Garnering a lot of momentum from her previous (and still current) project Brave Exhibitions, which is about the same thing, but not really. It’s based out of London, but it’s focused within a similar scene. She’s been running it together with James Lowry for some time now. Anyway, since club-nights only and installations at that, didn’t really pinpoint what was happening around her, she sketched out an idea for a book in 2011. This later on formed into a bigger project, which would come out in 2013 and also include a compilation of tracks to accompany the book itself. Like a soundtrack for everything that’s been gathered around. There’s a lot to say about Jen Ellerson, and she’s got a lot of experience within multimedia as such, but hopefully this interview will clear up a lot of question-marks. I asked her about the book, the idea behind it, Brave Exhibitions, Modern Movement, what it was like coming to Berlin, how Berlin differs from London and much more. I’m hoping that you’ll find this informative and enjoyable, and I hope that some of you actually recognize yourselves as part of this story.

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