Listen: Morthouse – Morthouse

a1456909509_10

Oh how Montreal fosters our youth. With music not only from there, but also from the stronghold Toronto – which have given us much prosperous acts – that in turn don’t have to look far and wide to find accomplices. From this city comes a duo whom share the same surname, which makes you wonder if they’re indeed brothers. Thomas L’Allier and Philippe L’Allier are the main characters behind this trio, which gets their drumming lent by Samuel Gemme. He’s the one whom gives them their nice rhythm, although the riffing and the general mood of their tracks suggest a wider conspiracy – where everything needs to be fitted right to create their rather unique sound. Not that anyone else haven’t done it before, but I like the nicely done rhythms that coincide with their wonderfully spooky and melancholic theme that seems to be a re-occuring concept.

Almost a month ago or less, they released their first album which is the self-titled “Morthouse“-release. It’s among the better crossovers between mainly post-punk, alternative rock and goth rock that I’ve heard. Thrown in is the urgent vibe that no-wave creates with its messy undertones that are concocted well together with melodies – which makes this influence far too melodic to have the amelodic overtone that only no-wave can contribute with. Not to mention how they use different instruments in perfect harmony, bringing a dark cabaret touch to their otherwise completely magnificent self-image. Now they’ve also got the cockiness that is needed to really bring forth the funkiness and jazzyness that can be heard between the lines dropped by the brothers. I’m feeling like I’ve been invited to a cabaret and that I can see them behind the scenes. The music is unraveled and I’m instantly intriguied by it as they casually bring forth their more instigated selves. A must-listen for everyone of you at home longing for a proper crossover release and not a kitsch re-interpretation. Listen to the whole album down below.

Exclusive Premiere: Golden Diskó Ship – Say Goodbye To This Island – Over And Out

1495313_672857229421204_514945615_o

Never have experimental pop been so experimental. This feels like an edge towards New Zealand, anchored in the depths of Dunedin, in good company with no-wave pop-experimentalists Opposite Sex. But instead of forming a group, Theresa Stroetges uses her multi-instrumentalism to forge thoughtful and sincere landscapes of sound with her semi-acoustic emergence. Theresa goes by the name of Golden Diskó Ship – a solo-project that is about to venture out on the deep blue sea, unleashing her second album in November. Going on untamed waters seems like something that would happen on the get-go for her, because of how natural everything feels; while listening to her music. Having already made a mark with a track on the compilation “City Splits #1” and one on The Wire Trapper’s June 2012 compilation, it’s safe to say she knows what she’s doing – and she actually did – because her debut-album came not long after that, titled “Prehistoric Ghost Party“, recorded at the legendary Faust Studio which is Hans Joachim Irmler’s (Klangbad) workplace. She’s also got two EPs released earlier, so now one should hope that she’s nailed her own sound.

SM046LP016_front

The second album is in a world of it self. There’s such a likeness to the different sound-scapes, the soothing melodies and sometimes rhythmic progressions that never leave you with a dull moment. A thin red line goes through it, connecting dots between each track and keeping it both thematically interesting and coherent. There doesn’t have to be any incoherence when it comes to experimentalism, not with Theresa’s wonderfully composed tracks which are out-of-the-box musically – but theoretically keep a sharp line that divides each track musically and topically. Repartiseraren has gotten the honor to exclusively premiere a track from her forthcoming album. The album is titled “Invisible Bonfire“, and the song of our choice was “Say Goodbye To This Island – Over And Out“. There was a thought to feature “Swan Song“, but it’s the last track on that album and we think that the aforementioned song has a bit of everything from the album. So here you go, enjoy the first publicly available track from that album. The album will be released on Spezialmaterial Records on the 25th of November.

Some questions for Ray Creature!

ray

Ray Creature is a band that I thoroughly admire since hearing their first release “Don’t Stop Talking EP” which was recently put out on NO! Record Label. Both of them are Americans and I first thought they were a band, but they’re actually a duo. This duo is compromised of Jon Erich Booth and Natascha Buehnerkemper, having been Jon’s solo-project at first it transformed into a duo. Which is both surprising, since most of their sound is so underrated and explicitly great that I actually wouldn’t have thought that it would’ve not been a band, but hey, here they are. Right after their first release they actually had another one which is getting put out by Sister Cylinder, a full-length S/T debut album. I wanted to clear out some things that I wanted to have answered, so I put out a series of questions which they answered. JEB stands for Jon Erich Booth and NB stands for Natascha Buehnerkemper. Enjoy it. You might also enjoy the freely downloadable track “White Suits” – taken from their S/T debut.

It’s interesting to note that you’re a duo. I would’ve expected it to be a whole band, considering the variety in your sound. Why are you a duo and not a whole band?

JEB: – That’s an effect of layering instrumentation. We take ideas from No Wave and other minimal aesthetics, but our music is in no way minimal. If a song calls for more instrumentation, we add it. Natascha and I have similar ideas about music, and we’ve found ways to reproduce the songs live, so adding more musicians seems unnecessary at this point. Anyway, it’s hard to find people who won’t dilute ideas with compromises or conflicting theories about how the music should work.

NB: – Ray Creature actually started out as Jon’s solo project, and I joined in August of last year. My addition brought along with it the possibility to add even more dimension, both live and recorded. When we play live, there’s so much going on in the backing tracks, having just two of us brings a minimal element to the live shows that is counter to the complexity of the music, which I think makes it more exciting. On another note, being a duo as opposed to a whole band gives us a lot more flexibility regarding touring and shows. Less scheduling bullshit to deal with.

You started out with three demo-tracks and later on you were picked up by NO! Record Label, or how did it go by? What went into recording “Don’t Stop Talking”?

JEB: – When we played a show with Dry Socket, Dylan Ettinger couldn’t make it so Joseph McGlone, the founder of NO!, filled in on synth. After the show he expressed interest in putting out a cassette tape. We had already been producing the self-titled LP with Scott Ferguson of Sister Cylinder Records, so we took an extended version of the opening track, “Don’t Stop Talking,” and three other tracks that didn’t make it on the record and packaged them together as the “Don’t Stop Talking” EP.

“Don’t Stop Talking” is our modest attempt at an austere funk track. Like most of our songs it started with drum machine and bass. The interplay of the guitar, my and Natascha’s vocals, and the lead synth followed from an attempt to keep an unvarying bass line interesting over the course of several minutes.

NB: – I view the “Don’t Stop Talking” EP as a companion release to our LP. It seems that it might be confusing to have two separate releases coming out at the same time on different formats, but in my mind the cassette release was perfectly timed. Even though some of the songs didn’t make it onto the LP, I think they’re really great, and they fit well with the LP aesthetically. It’s possible that we could end up going in a slightly different direction with our future releases, so it’s exciting that all the songs from this songwriting phase were able to make it onto some physical format at once.

Why did you decide to go with such a varied sound, was it the result of experimentation during a long period?

JEB: – I try not to over-determine the music with genre requirements or restrictions. Each song points in its own direction and writes itself to some degree. That’s to say, a set of elements in a song will suggest further styles of instrumentation, which lead to unexpected sounds and song structures. This can create weird stylistic juxtapositions, but it also sets up dramatic transitions within songs, which I think is one of our strengths. For better or worse, that’s the only way I’ve been successful at songwriting while keeping myself interested. There are enough people writing minimal, genre consistent electronic music —I don’t see myself contributing much of interest to that.

NB: – It actually opens us up to being flexible for different shows. Depending on the bands with which we’re playing, we might decide to play our more poppy, dancy tunes. Or we might decide that it’s more appropriate to go a more abrasive, dark route. Since our songs tend to go in a few different directions, it really opens us up to being able to play with lots of different types of bands.

You’re going to have a self-titled debut album out in June with another label called Sister Cylinder. I also noted that you’ve gotten mastering help from Mahern Audio. Have you been mastering your releases on your own before this, or what? How did it feel to have your debut mastered there?

JEB: – I recorded the self-titled LP and recorded and mastered the “Don’t Stop Talking” EP, but I’m an amateur engineer and a dilettante mastering engineer. Since I’m untrained I end up trying too hard in that area. I was exhausted with recording by the time we had the LP mastered by Mahern. I felt relieved to have songs taken out of my hands and began trying desperately and unsuccessfully to forget about them forever. I’m proud of them, but I’ve grown to hate them in some ways. They’re like time-sucking kids I was ready to kick out of the house. Any opinion I have about them is by now irrelevant.

Since you’re going to play a lot of shows in the near future, what are your experiences when playing live? In what way are you stoked for your future performances?

JEB: – We now know the songs well enough to occasionally forget we’re playing them, which is ideal. I like presenting the music at shows, but from the perspective of live performance, the idea is to let the songs go and be inside them rather than exert control over them. We’re touring with Bad Psychic, another electronic act from Bloomington, which is a pleasure because the music is great and the style works with ours. So I’ve been looking forward to every show.

NB: – We’re writing to you right now from Nashville, TN on our third day of a two-week tour. I think this is true of most bands, but people get the best idea of what we’re like from our live performances. We play pretty loudly with a lot of speakers and the live, often repetitive drum parts add an element of intensity that I think people find entertaining, even if they may not be digging what we’re actually playing. It’s always hugely rewarding to see people in the crowd looking pumped about what we’re doing, and it’s a huge payoff for all the hard work we put into this.

It’s nice to be having a freely downloadable track from you. Could you tell me something about it and also what’s in store for you in the coming months?

JEB: – “White Suits” is what passes for another Ray Creature dance track. There was some debate over whether or not to include it on the LP because of its length and atmosphere, but I think it ultimately worked. I tend to think of it as an alternate approach to ideas we were trying to get at with “Don’t Stop Talking.”

In the coming months we hope to start recording our second LP. The plan is to write more relentlessly aggressive songs and incorporate more of Natascha’s vocals alongside my own. Beyond that, we hope it will inspire some confused sexual feelings in people who thought they weren’t confused to begin with—the noblest ambition of rock music.

Down below you can find the track “White Suits” which is freely downloadable as a part of this questionnaire. Hope you enjoy it and do listen to their sound from their own Bandcamp, too, as a complement. If you want to buy it, you should check out Sister Cylinder.

NO! Spotlight: Dry Socket / Ray Creature! [Part II]

 tumblr_static_use2

I found a rather anonymous label which is situated in Terre Haute, Indiana. The American label that I found is called NO! Record Label and is hosting itself on Tumblr, giving off a rather secluded interior for me to find mysterious. All the better, because it leaves much to my own imagination. This mysterious label have released two releases before those that I am going to cover in this spotlight. One of the releases are of Drekka and Assimilation – a kind of live re-work of each others live performances – but also a late introductory for me to Michael Andersons brainchild Drekka. This was actually the first release to be put out on this label. The second release was a compilation featuring the artists Drekka, NOON, John Flannelly, Canid, Assimilation and Agakus. Featured musicians working in the Bloomington, Indiana area, described by the label: “a collection of tracks that represents the loose circle of musicians that play weird electronic music together in basements, coffee houses, and bars“. But the two releases that I’m going to cover here are Dry Socket and in the second part; Ray Creature. This is the last part and it features Erich Booth and Natascha Buehnerkemper, known as Ray Creature. Let’s see if you enjoy it.

a3748909156_10Ray Creature. The fourth release on NO! Record Label is “Don’t Stop Talking EP“, featuring four tracks. Lo and behold, what I find is one of the finest examples of what can be done with post-punk. Combining it with the wide-array of genres like dark wave, no-wave, synth-pop and a rather odd experimentalism is the way to go. The fact that Ray Creature is a duo is mind-boggling, because they sound like they’ve had a whole band and that they just quit after this EP due to the difficulty of conveying such a sound. Such a huge sound is being created by two people. A shady sound, with funky undertones of the baseline and the general feel of it is somewhere in between the bizarre and the ingenious. Unfortunately all the steam goes to the track “Don’t Stop Talking” which is probably the best track on the release. After the haziness of the minimal synth landscape, which suddenly just shifts into some kind of disco-vibe mess, featuring no-wave vocals and a general sense of disobedience. The modular synthesizers are working hard on delivering the undertones of electronica to such a harsh example of the successes this band has, with experimentalism. After the first track which could be regarded as setting the theme for the rest of the release, it just delves into some kind of weird example of how the electronica doesn’t really cope with the weirdness of the atmosphere. There’s such a messy landscape of sound that you don’t really know what to look for. Too much happening at the same time.

Even though I know their ambitions have been great, they once again pick up where they left off the stream after “Success“, when we enter “Ripped Apart” – a totally energized maelstrom of the best synthesizers and up-tempo beat you could find. Cocky vocals at that, too. Don’t get me wrong, the concept of “Success” is good to begin with, but I just end up finding myself reminded about the melody – but in the way of that is the general anarchy that actually turns me away from that track to begin with. The last track seems to be a whole long intermezzo between catchy instrumentation, steady rhythms and a snare-sound that i find myself enjoying more than the general mood of the track at all. The vocals in this track is so good, but I don’t really enjoy the lyricism. Even though I have a lot of criticism to give, the general feel of the EP is great. It seems to be long in between when you hear about a sound that has taken off, then you listen to it and find out that it’s like something you’ve heard before – but not really in this format. They do a good job of pulling off the crossover between genres and fill it up with nice experimentalism. I must say that without the soothing but urgent vocals that Natascha deliver, this wouldn’t be as great of an experience as it really was. Enjoy it yourselves by streaming and listening to it here, down below.

Listen: The Anxiety Of Love discography!

1451534_717393734985036_9139490704210610031_n

The Anxiety Of Love, made up by former members of Red Lorry Yellow Lorry, Certain General, Joan Of Arc Family, Treehouses and other bands – have just put up their discography for you to stream. From their first release “One E.P.“, which was released in 2012. To their latest release “The Anxiety Of Hate E.P.“. From having their releases put out by the notable Berlinian label aufnahme + wiedergabe, to having their releases put out by their own independent label The Essence Of Soul Limited, Vocoder Tapes and Peripheral Minimal. They’re actually one of the few bands that carry the earlier wide-spread tradition of no-wave into a whole other world, together with their rather long and drone-inspired songs plus releases, to the shorter versions riddled with what Michael B. Wood (the singer) of the band calls; “meth rock“. A most noticeable influence however, would be the looming cold wave atmospheres that knit their no-wave tighter to the most unbearable point of listening, but that is the point of what they are. Another interesting thing about them letting their discography be streamed properly, is the fact that the earlier unreleased tracks that are of compilation-variety, have been put up as samples to be listened to under the collective name of: “So Lonely In Your Crowd“. Before and after they got hinged with different labels, they actually self-released a couple of releases.

a1783658167_10

The<<Nausea Libido>>“-single is a reminder of how great their self-released tracks got play-time through their D.I.Y-ethics, but also the live-document “soap in the blood” which features tracks from their live-performances. Another release that is probably seeing the day of light on a physical edition of vinyls, is the release that originally was scheduled for Tujunga Flats, but unfortunately never happened. This release, “The Swarm.“, is a nice reminder of how you can make it without the help of both major and independent labels – unless you’re making it darn sure to do it on your own. A lot of their music is unique in different kinds of ways, never leaving the ultimate darkness in which they brood, staying true to their core principles – makes for a different kind of listening experience – and it shines through. Their music is not that easy to categorize at best, but can be put into the goth rock, meth rock, cold-wave and no-wave, pocket. Now when they’ve been kind enough to put up their whole discography for your listening pleasure, digitally of course, wouldn’t you mind doing them a service and stream it until you drop? Because I know that I would. There are a lot of things to discover and you can do that right now. Stream their whole discography here on Repartiseraren.

Exclusive Premiere: The Folk – Subtle Play

a0959364456_10

Rock’n’roll or not, that’s out of the question. Canada has fostered The Folk. They’re an unusually interesting rock’n’roll band, at least if you’d enter the premise of “rock‘n’roll” with the ambition of some post-rock and no-waveish influences every now and then. Having released “You Say, I Say” in the midst of Winter in 2011, and the year after that putting out “Say It Again” – both of them being three-tracked releases – they’re now back with their first debut-LP. A full-length album with eleven tracks. Marking their departure from their earlier medium, entering their new self. They’ve just gone out of their shell and are going into the world of the newly-hatched. However, there’s something about their rather mellow rock’n’roll that makes you take another breath, and not huff out the words of “this is some generic rock’n’roll“. It’s solely because of their unique departure into the incomprehensible beauty of their melodies, and their complex rhythm which branches out into a multitude of territories. Mixing both the joyous and rather depressive melodies, with the more upbeat and energetic ones. Accompany that fact with a female vocalist who gives her all. This will certainly be a rather interesting output, into the world of rock’n’roll. Some parts you enjoy, other parts you don’t. That is how it should be.

But we’re more then glad to be giving you a track from their forthcoming album “We All Say“. Which is going to be released on 11th of March for the digital version of the album, and the 15th of March for the LP-version of the album. The track that we’re about to give you is “Subtle Play“, one of their longest tracks on this album. We think it gives a comprehensible representation in sound, and it represents them and what this album is all about. So you can stream this track to your own delight down below, and be sure to check them out and their album. There are other tracks that are available to be played on their album, and they’ll come in handy if you’re getting tired of “Subtle Play“. But we hope you’d rather not, since this is a great track. Stream it as you well please. The Folk is Emma BV, Sara BV, Mark Ferrari, Liam Magahay and Patrick Rody.

Free Download: MERX – Poor Unfortunate Sons

12 Jacket (3mm Spine) [GDOB-30H3-007}

MERX is a moniker that is made up by a half of German Army. Yes, that’s correct, the German Army that I’ve covered not too long ago when they released their album “Last Language“. You could probably figure out that yourself, since a lot of the sound resembles their super-group. MERX latest album “20000 Sq Ft Under The Sea” was re-issued by Permanent Records – whom also put out “Merx“, their self-titled debut. What makes this release an oddity, though, is their classic post-punk mixed with the remnants of the late 80’s New Yorkish no-wave. These Los Angeles hounds are not easily moved or impressed, but they share a lot of influences that can be recovered from that particular decade. Combine that with the cold harnessed touch of cold wave, and you’re set for you trip into megalomaniac territories. Even though their debut was more cleanly shaven and post-punkish at its core, these post-punkers care not to delve into old cliches. Cris-crossing genres is a sport they would gladly engage in. Even engaging in such outlandish behavior as to combine the industrial electronics into the minimal, but cynical – mess. As you delve into their landscape, fear not the no-wave sound, because these heroin-fueled dreams become a longing – as the clinking guitars and groovy baseline catch you (and your breath). Breathe when you’re near, because they have a terrible odor. Cherish the time you had without them, but please remain seated during this experience. We’re here to offer you the last track on their record, namely “Poor Unfortunate Sons“, exclusively on Invisible Guy – as a free download. Listen to it and remember to not shriek in tune with them, or they’ll make a mess of you in their musical setting. Terrible news, isn’t it?

You can buy the re-issued record straight from Permanent Records, strictly limited to 100 copies on vinyl. Make sure you check out the original release that went out on Skrot Up earlier this year, also.