Review: TSTI – Endings

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Some time ago TSTI had his third album released, or second if you don’t count “Evaluated: An Album Of Remixes“. German-based Basic Unit Productions have gotten the pleasure to release “Endings” – which is the apt title of the release. Other Voices Records have also gotten their share of it and have released a limited edition cassette of it. We’ve had the possibility of listening to a few of the demos before this was released and they sounded promising, as does his whole discography. The aesthetics of the release are industrial and very cut and paste, not really anything we enjoy at all, and the first album “Evaluations” looked more alluring visually.

The album clocks in at around thirty-six minutes in total. So let’s get into what this album has to offer in its entirety, by doing a track-by-track review of it.

Things I Would Do” is a special kind of song when it comes to the atmosphere, right from the start there is an inviting kind of mystic vibe over it but at the same time an assertive industrial sound to it. We’re not really fans of the processed vocals at all but the lyrics in this song are simple but add a catchy melodious tone to an – at first – deserted landscape. The favorite part comes forth in the build-up until the chorus and the chorus itself, as they both pack a melodious punch which is remindable and emotional. It lurks in the background and comes out in full bloom together with the drum beats and snaredrum, which later on forms a stunning introductory to a hopefully, equally as great album.

We’ve been fortunate enough to hear the craftsman, S. Smith, create this marvelous tune step-by-step until it finally was released on Basic Unit Productions. Even though the fondness of the demo-version of this song have caught on, his stamp throughout it makes for a more bombastic and impactful experience.

Naïveté (feat. Jennifer Touch)” is a lot more pop-influenced then the first one, but he stays true to himself and his sound, which allows for a heavier side to take place amongst the cheesier vibes of the flute and the melody itself. It is not necessarily the build-up and climax of the song which is interesting, but rather the dissective nature of the downbeat melodies that are produced in between – giving it a whole atmosphere instead of a half one. We don’t think “Jennifer Touch” adds anything that gives this song momentum, or a different characteristic, which is probably not what was meant – but as a collaborative effort it is stale. The instruments and rhythm are more interesting here then the synthesizers for the most part, as they are more complex and add more to the song overall.

The slower nature of “Sincerity” allows S. Smith to build up a better atmosphere then in any of the other songs, this one crushes totally in terms of the synthesizers vibrancy and the emotional delivery of his vocals. It is almost like an anthemic ballad in of itself and layer upon layer of instrumentation cut right through and form the shape of a transgression between straight-forward synth-pop and ambient music. A very nice addition which sprawls from his old sound and new, to connect and make something greater then all of that. Too bad that he underestimates this kind of touch with his other songs, whom are more industrial in nature, but not in the crafty kind of way – because they build upon a foundation of synth-pop – instead of a transgressiveness between severeal genres.

It is a dreamy song and we drear the end of it, which comes at a too fast pace unfortunately. Even though it is the slowest song yet, but at the time it is allowed to brood and deliver chord upon chord of nicely laden synthesized beauty – is precisely the reason why one ought to check out TSTI in his new form.

Forgive Me” catch elements of the previous song and have also been featured on Repartiseraren’s own compilation “Whoever Am I”, long before release. It is noticeable how Sid’s (from Schwefelgelb) mastering have affected the song, because it is somewhat different from Zarkoff (who mixed the re-mastered compilation) – so it is very intriguing to hear how different characteristics, in terms of mastering – can be heard in the end product. Since we have a special bond to this song in terms of nostalgia itself, it is hard to not have a personal connection to the song itself, but it lacks in momentum although it is picked together quite good through the atmosphere of the song itself. There is never a dull moment and around the corner there’s a whole different interpretation in itself.

The song has very different characteristics throughout, which is what ultimately makes it different as well as fitting at the same time. Everything runs like clockwork and the time never stops until S. Smith cares to do it himself, by ending on a high note. It’s a very classy song in terms of tone and clarity, where the repetetive lyrics play an integral role to it moving forward at all.

Strange Times” really catches one off-guard. Damn, the first melody is a work of art in itself and from there and on you can’t turn the song off. Had S.U.R.V.I.V.E moved in a different way and taken the help of S. Smith – this is how it would sound like. There’s a certain niceness about the mysticism in the song itself, the sweet touches of synthesizers and not-too-industrial beats make this outstanding synth-pop music. By now, had it been some other album, it probably would’ve dulled off by now. Here’s the part where musicians fall short, oftentimes, if they have an album that goes on for as many songs as “Endings” does. The samples that can also be heard but in another form, on “Naïveté (feat. Jennifer Touch)” take a step into informing the listener – rather then shake the world together with beats.

It is good to hear how the first melody is expanded in the end and clangs out like it should’ve. Not that we’ve heard this song before, but because it is just what is supposed to happen – it is the destiny of this song.

To Visit You Again” is metaphorically speaking the most emotional song so far. Both in message and sound. The longing, the outdrawn beats that scrape against the soundscape and the desperation in the atmosphere that lunge towards you in an instant. It draws upon mutated choirs that between added effects and from high to low notes, add a nicely angelic touch to an otherwise doom and gloom song. It is also the only instrumental song on the whole album. Which is a pleasure to listen through. The repetetiveness of it doesn’t bother at all because it is inventive and make use of the different small touches added to the whole totality of sound. When “Flatter Me” comes on, it is obvious that it is a direct continuation of the aforementioned instrumental song. They share many of the same ambitions in being emotionally touching and direct, together with impervious melodies that never stagnate.

Here though, the melodies are taken into a different direction which both touch upon these elements and create a whole other atmosphere – the intangible nature of TSTI’s sound is one of his strengths. All of a sudden everything is downhill and from there it goes uphill, the emotions come crashing down and the beats develop intensity as they shift from rhythm to rhythm. Very flattering of him to do so.

R.A.S.” never hits home but at the same time does. It is a song filled with paradoxical sound production, with melodies that sound oriental at times and the complete opposite. There’s a shyness and awkwardness about it as a whole, as if he doesn’t want it to bloom out completely – as he holds it even closer. He shapes and unshape things, from rhythms that don’t really make sense to beats that almost put the synthesizer’s wonderful soundscaping out of play. Maybe it is the complete destruction of everything, the ending as it is, even though this certainly isn’t his last contribution in terms of sound as TSTI.

Unfortunately, the remixes of “Things I Would Do“, by Hante and Ssleeping desiresS don’t do the original justice. It is much better and their versions of it aren’t up to par with it, and it doesn’t even create anything tangible from the perspective of making a new version, or something that could possibly stand out in any way, in terms of musicianship.

The album as a whole is a decent thing to listen to. It might even be better then that, though some things are hit and miss – but when it comes down to it, TSTI hones his old sound and develops something new – not necessarily breaking everything down and making the outcome dull and boring. Listen to it in whole down below.

 

 

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Review: Led Er Est – Dust On Common

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To be honest, I haven’t paid that much attention to Led Er Est at all. Their sound haven’t attracted me in any way, yet I decided to do a track-by-track review of their first release “Dust On Common” (now re-released by Mannequin Records) originally released on the New York label Wierd Records, in 2009. However, my initial reaction on their music will not affect how I review this record – it is all about how good or bad the songs are, individually – and how good the album is in general. The album is around 35 minutes long in total.

For a person that haven’t listened that much to Led Er Est, the first song “Bikini Fun” is catchy and gloomy at the same time. Even though the name of it is kind of inane, it doesn’t reflect in the atmosphere at all – the amped up and bleak vocals add a whole other dimension to the soundscape – together with flipped out guitar-riffs and solid, rhythmic drumming, minimalistic synthesizers warped in and out – together with a baseline that could break through walls – make for a thoroughly wild experience.

There’s a nice way to how they tweak everything, especially the vocals. It is a very nice mix between minimal synth and new wave music, at the same time that it wants to be uptempo and is – they keep the downtempo in terms of how the song progresses – going from a stripped environment to a concentrated barrage of all instruments at the same time. It does also fade out very nicely.

AsPort Isabel” comes on, it is a more straight-forward track. It starts off very good with riffs that are put in well, together with the constant synthesizer-stabs and steady rhythm – but then, suddenly, the vocalist enters – and everything goes downhill from there. What could’ve been an emotionally touching song turns into everything but. Maybe this song should’ve been named “Bikini Fun” instead of the first one – because with such a beautiful name and pleasant introduction – it shouldn’t be reduced to utter tripe. Moving on.

Laredo” thankfully return the original song-style, which pairs much better with their music. It is a very oldschool-sounding and spastic atmosphere, giving back to the roots that started it off once. Minimal wave have never sounded better together with new wave, if that makes any sense. Instead of going too minimalistic with just the one synthesizer and the accompanying melody – they’ve added sweeping beauty to it and a perfectly laden guitar to match it up with.

It never goes out of style and one could listen to it over and over again. The song feels much longer then it really is. With solid melodies and anarchistic vocals – you can go very far, apparently. It is what Led Er Est prooves at least, with how they’ve constructed it musically. “Destination Sanity” is something entirely different, minimal in rhythm but bombastic in everything else from synthesizer to the outdrawn vocals. Connecting the dots where they left off with “Port Isabel“, adding to that even more of their own characteristic sound – the good one.

There are even some gothic-sounding acoustic guitar that paves the way for complex melodies to entwine and push the sound even further, larger then anything else that’s currently been covered. It evokes an emotional response that is sorrowful in one way, a tragicomic farce translated into music, by all means tragicomic in a way that is beautifully told musically. One is touched by the sheer wondrousness of it all, something to daydream away into.

Eerily similar to “Laredo” is the fifth song “The Unkept Area” – where the songstyle in “Port Isabel” actually fits with the running theme of it. One of the most catchy songs so far, mostly due to the more energetic performance by the vocalist, plus all the freakishly quirky synthesizers that would sound horrible if not layered on one another. The desperateness of the singer descend into a violent, chaotic mixture that make each part of the atmosphere change slightly, going more and more berserk.

What becomes noticeable as “Something For The Children” plays, is not only the irony of the song-name itself, but how they transcend genres completely and bend them to their will. This goes into noise and back again into minimalistic synth. But what would all that be without a post-punk baseline? Not sure, but they’ve layered it indistinguishable at points with the screechy noise, at times playing almost solo – giving it a melodic touch – together with the rhythm of the noise. Quite deranged in the end. Even more ironic is how it fades out and then becomes “I Wait For You” – which is different.

How different? In many ways. The rhythm isn’t pumped up to the max, but more steadily going, while the melodies are of secondary importance. The coldness of the minimalistic atmosphere is what glimmers in the dark. Clad in a remorseful outfit, it almost makes it ballad-like in all simplicity. But they way they manage to keep changing everything around, firstly with just a few tweaks here and there, finally breaking out the synthesizer to completely mesmerize the listener. One of my favorite tracks on the whole release so far.

Scissors” is their definitive anthem. It is sad to hear how it goes down the same way that “Port Isabel” did. The vocals really don’t fit, they sound so off together with the wondrousness crafted with the drummachine and the synthesizers. There was an urgency in this song that allured to emotion – but as the vocals make their presence heard – one just wants to turn it off. Otherwise, had it not been like that, it would’ve been a great song. But no, sorry, it simply doesn’t fit with everything else and if anyone suggest it does – sure, it might, but in a very weird and unkempt manner.

CC Exit” is all-in-all a nice medley, intermezzo if you will. A bridge which one would want to cross, to find out what is beyond it. Since I haven’t heard their other, later releases, it’s kind of an obstacle to describe it in relation to one another. But in regards to the album as such it is something that keeps you stunned, and motivated to seek out what comes next. Led Er Est have made an impression with this, first release. I weren’t too interested or thrilled to be listening to their music before, but this album prooves me wrong.

Well worth a buy from Mannequin Records now that they’ve re-released it. Buy it here. Listen to the album in full down below, to make up your own mind about it.

 

 

[2nd] December: TSTI – This Way (Inst. Version)

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To be honest I haven’t been monitoring the rapid success of TSTI for a while. I remember when he was in the process of releasing his debut-album, but after that he’s also released a follow-up and there’s more yet to come. Sometimes you just loose track of everything when you’re knee-deep into everything. There’s so much to keep your own eyes and ears open to and there’s so much really untalented junk which floats around on the internet—some of it which is received through e-mail that you don’t even open and send to the trash-bin right away—that you get lost, for real. Even though I know that many things are left unexplored, it’s hard to keep it close and actually have the time to listen through it. I’m hoping that my article will do justice to what I’m going to present to you in the end of it. Before that I need to go through what is unique with TSTI and why he’s featured in Ljudkalendern — the unnamed project which got a name, when the final artwork had been received. It’s really simple and is kind of catchy in Swedish but not in English, as it translates to: “Sound-calendar“. Therefore I’ve decided to keep the Swedish name.

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We’re already in December and time flies by like it didn’t even care for us puny humans. Not that it ever does, because it’s not reversible, but sometimes you wish time would have mercy and be slow for once—not only when you’re doing something really dull. It has more to do with our perception than it has to do with time itself, I can understand and cope with that, but I wish I could just stop and reflect for a moment—which rarely, if ever, happens. TSTI have been releasing so many great tracks since the first release for this solo-project of his, originally intended to be a bedroom synthpop project, turned into a minor mammoth that just seems to go on and on… and on. I don’t really know if he stays true to what he once wanted for it, but that doesn’t make a difference for me anyway, the only difference that have been made is that he’s evolved really much. From a rather neatly placed synth-pop package with huge ambitions—turned upside down, making it an ambitious project extremely nicely packaged both in sound and aesthetics. His artwork follows a linear curve and the only thing different is the main focus point, which feature an industrial compound (Evaluated), as opposed to the Victorian setting on his debut-album (Evaluations). It will be exciting to see what’s going to happen in 2015 and if the aesthetics will follow the red line, or go past, above, away or beyond it. Because he’s releasing something new in the beginning of next year on Desire — and I’m thrilled about it.

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So when I asked him if he would be interested in participating in a non-commercial collection that I was making, he surely was and gave away an instrumental version of a track featured on his forthcoming release. It never got onto the official release itself, so I thought—why not place it on Ljudkalendern? Said and done — now we had an agreement. It is my pleasure to introduce to you an instrumental version of the track “This Way“, taken from his coming album that will be out next year—2015. It’s a step away from what I was used to hearing on his debut-album, definitely with obvious leanings to electronic body music and industrial music, but also with contrasts like including a panpipe in an industrialized setting. Harsh beats, complex rhythms and a nicely woven melody which is supported by this bizarre instrument. A thoughtful song which doesn’t become less interesting than the fully vocalized original track. Before you go and listen to it, read my poem about it. Otherwise, if you’re not into poetry — here’s for December the 2nd and a brand new premiere on Ljudkalendern!

Metal pipes and ringing sounds,
working hard in our compounds
Hammer to metal, machines for humans,
benefited for all means

This is 2nd of December and for now the story is moving straight ahead, but we’re long from close to our final destination. Tomorrow a new song will be released and the story is to be built upon and continued. Until then, enjoy another exclusive song; “This Way” (Inst. Version), on Repartiseraren.

Exclusive Premiere: Zex Model – Rokk

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Pink Sexdeath, Degenerate Slug, Demon City Reaper? Three names have one thing in common – they’re all names thought out – and executed in musical form, by a man living in Kaliningrad, Russia. Not only does he have all those alter-egos, but many more that I won’t list. He is or have been a part of two groups called Modern Howl and Ninika, each one different from the other, but also closely knitted together by darker genres. Even though he’s had a lot of projects going on at the same time, he’s dabbling with a special kind of project which he calls “Zex Model“. This musical project started out not too long ago and pushed him further into musical obscurity than what you’d think. Considering this, his project has risen in popularity since his first releases – and opening for Lust Of Youth in Russia. With his official debut-album “Mind Slaughter” having been released on desire records in 2013, and a self-released EP titled “First Mutation” – he solidified his presence further. Once a darling in the brooding underground, now a good rated artist fit for another level in the underground.

Simultaneously in another part of the world, a man by the name of Fade Kainer (Theologian, etc) self-releases his first album “Mask Visions Poison” under the name of Statiqbloom. This is in 2013. America have gained yet another notable industrial-act that strays away from the cliches, and embraces their own version of what inspired them in the first place. Meaning; they decide to twist the originals of the 1980’s and 1990’s by layering their own vision upon the ground which those men built upon. The building blocks are on a steady ground. The album itself sells out on cassette and remains on CD up until now. Two alternatives offered, one bought and sold. Even though both Zex Model and Statiqbloom are very much alike, the last-mentioned relies on heavy electro beats and a body rhythm, whilst Zex Model is utilizing the rough texture of industrial on experimental soil; to the maximum. Then we entered 2014 and brooding for Statiqbloom was yet another album which he gave the title “Black Mirrors“, released only on a limited edition cassette. This was to be a release before two kings met up and decided to build upon a platform settled by them both, and others. Diplomacy entered the game and here we are.

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Fast-forward to later October, early November this year and you’re in for a treat. It was only a matter of time until desire brought these two new-comers closer together. In regards to their sound, it was a sound choice. Zex Model and Statiqbloom engage in a split-release that features eight tracks in total and four tracks by each artist. The apt design for this release is what Fade Kainer thought out and did. From the first four “Atropy Of Three“, “Contaminate“, “Slow Void” and “Behind Glass (Second Pane)” courtesy of Statiqbloom on side one. To side two featuring “Forbidden Alterations“, “Rokk“, “Teosophia” and “Tokyo Blitz” by Zex Model. I chose the second track “Rokk“, because of the atonal message that is what makes his project what it is in the first place. From his ode to Skinny Puppy and the likes, to his experimentalism that fiddles with a classic industrial atmosphere and makes the atonality spin the wheel – a confusing sound which at first obfuscates the rhythm – but later on is quite a trip into the originality of his project. A harsher version of Nexus Kenosis might actually find a way through your mind, intentionally or not. Stream the exclusive track “Rokk” down below and see to that you buy the vinyl from desire records when it comes out, if you like what you’re hearing.

Spotlight: Water Torture – Pillbox

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Someone enlightened me to the existence of Water Torture. I think I had heard of them a couple of times not too long ago, but it is easy to mix everything up. This band is a trio hailing from the US with members from Bestower, but also from numerous other bands. Ian Wiedrick, Matt Goodrich and Thomas Leyh are the names of the foundation which this trio stands upon. When it comes to their band, they’ve released a lot of different EPs and singles which makes me think of Agathocles and how bands within the genres of grindcore, powerviolence and fastcore – to mention a few sub-genres – release so much material that it’s insane. They first got released on Human Beard, a split-release with Dirt Eyes that was put out on cassette back in 2011. Since then a range of releases have been put out on labels such as Diseased Audio, Knochen Tapes, Mannequin Rein, Nice Dreams Records, CONTINUUM., Dead Heroes Records, Prime Eggsample Records and Nerve Altar. In other words, they’ve got a hell lot of material to be listened through for those of you interested in hardcore, grindcore and powerviolence. Not to mention that they’ve already gathered so much material that three different compilations have been released, namely “Tour 2013“, “Discography” and “Collection“. Finally they’ve been readied to put out their first real album on Nerve Altar.

The album is titled “Pillbox” and feature seventeen tracks. From what I have gathered it seems like most of the tracks are exclusive for this release alone. Everything on it was recorded in May of 2014 together with (and by) John Angelo. It feels like they’ve gotten a rather nice, well-processed sound albeit a dirty one, with the help from John. When you listen through it you notice how it strays away from the general clichés that can often be attached to genres such as grindcore and power-violence. Even though it is clear that a hand is lent to the influences with each genre, collecting around the collectivized sluggishness that only a hint of sludge can bring with itself – which is perfectly thrown in there amidst all the noisy wrath of both vocals and music alike. I am utterly dismayed when listening to it but there never comes a moment where I feel like its too heavy of a burden to listen to. Because even though a lot of discontent can be felt throughout the general atmosphere of the album, they’ve executed the setting of every instrument into the sound-scape and the general theme of it – without overextending. The noise that they display in all of this helps to create a rather ominous setting for a barrage of drums, riffs and freakish rhythm that makes them stand out. I really like it a lot and I’ll have to thank whomever that got me into Water Torture for the first time. You can stream the release in whole down below and if you like what you’re hearing, pre-order the vinyl here.

Exclusive Premiere: Husbandry – Biralata

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In Brooklyn you find a band that has its roots down under, but above the ground they reside with post-punk overtones. With their interesting combination of metal, experimental rock, post-hardcore and post-punk they make way for who they’ve become. Since they haven’t been around for that long, let alone put out anything besides their newly released “Make Room For Waves” EP, it’s great to hear something fresh once in a while. With this comes Husbandry, whose singer sounds like somewhere in between Katzenjammer Kabarett‘s original misanthropic tone and the rather mesmerizing moments with the band reliq. Together with the breakdowns of pro-longed post-hardcore junkies caught in a time-machine. The band itself consists of Carina Zachary, Jordan Usatch, Arnau Bosc and Andrew Gottlieb. The fascinating thing about this release is that it was recorded during a weekend back in April this year, which makes it about a month later that they’re releasing it for the world to listen to.

So I got the opportunity together with Husbandry to put out one of the tracks from this release, on Repartiseraren. The track wasn’t really chosen by me to begin with, but I think it’s their best track on this release by far. Because in it they showcase the greatness of structured post-hardcore with post-punk baselines that soar through the landscape, together with erratic drums that keep the tempo to a max.  Just as they come into some kind of weird medley whereas Carina Zachary with her vocals make it an endurable process to listen to, as it moves back into the sound-scape which they created before. Moving back to the intermezzo once again in another part of the track, making it a very predictable but at the same time unpredictable track. I simply adore the melodies that are laden before me when you’ve taken yourself through it, together with cluttering hi-hats and complex rhythms howling in the background as the vocals feel even more dedicated and soulful. The track chosen for exclusive premiere was “Biralata“, a six-minute long song which you can listen to down below. If you’re interested in buying their album you can go to their Bandcamp.

Chondritic Spotlight: Jason Lescalleet and Sissy Spacek! [Part I]

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There have been a resurgence in releases lately. Chondritic Sound just put out a whole batch of new releases, featuring Jason Lescalleet, Sissy Spacek, Klinikal Skum and Fejhed. A video-tape and a batch of cassettes is what’s coming and a lot of people might’ve been waiting for the next life-sign of Chondritic. Even though the video-tape was announced some weeks ago, it’s readily available in a VHS-format, once more to be displayed by a proud label-owner. I think many people share his pride and find it positive with such an enthusiasm that he’s got going for his own label, as his supporters are not really few and far in between – but many. Sissy Spacek has a long line of releases that have been put out on this label, the first one being “DDT” in 2008, to “Grisp” and “Vacuum” 2010/2011, to “Billions And Billions” together with “ET Corpse/JFK” – both put out in 2013.  Klinikal Skum on the other hand, gets his first release on Chondritic Sound, ever. A rather joyous moment for aficionados in power electronics. Not to mention Fejhed, a new project birthed through collaborative effort between two known artists, one of them being at the forefront of what is produced on this cassette. Now we’ll get to writing about these releases, so hold your horses. You get Jason Lescalleet and Sissy Spacek in the first part.

lescalleet_vhs_dvdJason Lescalleet. The name might be familiar to those within the US, but also to those outside of it, if we expand his repertoire a bit. He’s been running the label Glistening Examples since 2006 – especially notable for the release “The Pilgrim” – a one-hour release with tracks made by himself, dedicated as a memorial to his late father. Or you might know him from his collaborations with Joachim Nordwall (iDEAL Recordings) with the group Enough!!!, his solo efforts and splits with Nmpering, Joe Colley, John Hudak, Aaron Dilloway – and countless other collaborative efforts signed this multifaceted man. Not only does he make music, but he’s also been directing lately. Since he released his DVD-collection he made as a creator and director, with thirteen different artists – put into thirteen different videos – he’s more than busy. This collection is called “Trophy Tape” and is based on the first CD of “Songs About Nothing“, which was released in 2012 on Erstwhile Records.

Since he with his own label decided to release it on DVD, Chondritic Sound made the effort to release it on VHS, as well. A rather interesting addition to his songs. It’s especially exciting that he’s let these video artists be film directors. The first track “The Beauty Of Independent Music” was done by Aaron Dilloway, the second “Old Theme” by Ellen Frances”, third “Tarnished Copper (Copper Will Never Be Gold)” by Annie Feldmeier Adams, fourth “The Loop” by Justin Meyers, fifth “Euphoric Sting” by Anthony Milton, sixth “Beauty Is A Bowtie (HTDW)” by C. Spencer Yeh, seventh “The Power Of Pussy” by Olivia Block, eight “Escargot” by Adel Soto, ninth “In The Morning, In The Winter Shade, On The First Of March, On The Holiday” by Neil Young Cloaca, tenth “Friday Night In A Catholic Home” by Todd Deal, eleventh “10 Amp Waves” by Jubal Brown, twelve “I Killed Another Day” by Heidi Alasuvanto, thirteenth “In Through The Out Door And Another Whore” by Robert Beatty. Outtakes from VHS/DVD can be seen from his own account, made for the Anthology Film Archives, up above. You can buy it from Chondritic Sound if you want the VHS, for twenty dollars. The DVD version can be bought from Glistening Examples.

a0609453241_10Sissy Spacek. The brainchild of… whomever it was back then, have certainly evolved from their grindcore past, to their noisecore future. Currently the home to Charlie Mumma and John Wiese, so the group has been chopped up and turned into a duo instead. It seems like it happened pretty late, after the split-release with Smegma in 2013 titled “Lipscomb b/w Absentia“, with the first release in 2014 titled “Incomprehensible Dehumanization“. Their first proper album release since back in 2012 with “Wastrel Projection” and “Contretemps” – the aforementioned one being more of a compilation of tracks – or rather a huge number of them. Before getting to the point I must say that I have no idea if Sissy Spacek is in somehow related (symbolically) to the American actress Sissy Spacek, because that’s what turns up when you search for it, other than these two guys. Anyhow, their newly released album (or compilation) is titled “Window Hammer“, featuring one of their old group-members Corydon Ronnau on vocals, since it was recorded in between the 7th May of 2013, whilst the last track on the release was “assembled” on the 9th of June. So that makes sense. The release itself is in a 7¨-format and DVDr – which contains them performing the material on the release – live from their West Coast tour. Twenty minutes of Sissy Spacek, which I’m afraid I haven’t heard of until now, is being launched at you in record speed – mind you, the tracks are really short. A proper blast in the face with a harsh but fast sound. Punk as fuck with an attitude you’d get with just that. The rather spastic vocals of Corydon Ronnau together with the brutal drums make up the atmosphere to be a lot more than it could’ve been, together with the grind kind of noise that the guitar makes. Fast drumming as hell and you won’t settle for anything less after you’ve just been blasted away in fifteen seconds or a little bit more, or less. Can be bought via Chondritic Sound. Stream the release down below, or buy the physical release to get the track “Seven Dwarfs“.