Exclusive Premiere: Identity Theft – Targeted Individuals

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In some genres there is a certain kind of experimentation allowed. When it comes to minimal synth, there seems to be an invisible box in which people that make this kind of music seldom go outside. Michael Buchanan of Seacrypt have a long-going project which goes by the name of Identity Theft. It’s a solo-project experimenting with minimal synth and synth-pop. He’s been making his music under this moniker since the first release “Night Workers” back in 2011. Then he was known as Djynnx Ogo and the aforementioned release is a testament to this, featuring material from 2008-2011 packed into a compilation. With little help of Duncan Gerow, Paul Sutfin and Chelsea Crypt, for both synthesizer work and vocals, on tracks like “Cryptoterrestrials“, “Small Knife” and “Our Game“. It took him one year to release his first proper album, titled “Security Theatre” – featuring material recorded in between 2011 and 2012. This was his first release since his new nickname had been formed. Entering a world of surveillance, loss of privacy and other current important issues related to this. Some months later his first mini-album emerged, titled “Black Opsis“. Originating from a label called Cognito Percepti. The difference with this mini-album was the original intention of making it a live-session, composed in 2011, whose tracks later became the album “Security Theatre“. Next, a true live-album came to be through the Record Label Records event “Memoirs of an Invisible Woman” recorded live in 2013.

Recently, the second proper album was released. It was titled “The Future Hates The Past” – featuring material recorded between 2013 and 2014. Repartiseraren was lucky to catch an exclusive premiere of the track “Targeted Individuals“, before the album itself was properly released digitally. Every release that I’ve counted here have been released on Michael Buchanan’s own label Katabatik. I believe that this song especially, show the experimental nature of what he’s trying to confront with this album. It’s probably the most experimental of the albums he’s released, which is perfectly noticeable with this track. A blend of paranoid minimal synth with original analog synth-pop makes the most skeptic electronica-lover a convinced believer. You can exclusively stream the track “Targeted Individuals” down below, alongside the full album that was released by him recently.

Interview with Schwefelgelb!

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When scouring the web for something interesting and new, you rarely find what you’re seeking – if you’re even seeking anything out, at all. Sometimes, you stumble upon something that is greater than the genres that can be attributed to the music at hand. Schwefelgelb is one of those exceptions. I happened to find them in connection with an earlier Gooiland Elektro release, titled “Dunkel Vor Den Augen Uns“, which contained a lot of great songs despite being a four-tracked EP. Which in turn made me interested in finding out more about them, as I had read a couple of lines in different interview with them. One of the most interesting thing is that they have a conceptual approach, which in turn make their presence even more noticeable. Even though my thoughts might be a wee bit disorganized, I decided to ask a few questions to Sid and Eddy – the core of Schwefelgelb itself. Hope you enjoy it, and have a Merry Christmas!

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Spotlight: German Army – Last Language

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It must be said that I am not that familiar with the work that German Army has put behind them, but I’m certainly familiar with the general mood of his music. Since I was sent the latest album “Last Language“, I must oblige to at least talk about it. This album is a veritable orgy with harsh reverberated noise, mixed with ethnic vibes and an utterly schizophrenic atmosphere. A lot of the tracks rely on sending a claustrophobic message, conveyed through colorless lenses, as another banging drum bites the dust. Swirling cataclysmic environments collide, in a matter of seconds, as buzzing industrialized tools give you a blood-curling experience. Whilst other tracks rely on heavy reverberation, to give another kind of characteristic to each individual track – as it is used differently every time. It feels like the tracks alternate into each characteristic, giving a general feeling of how the songs are divided up. When you listen closely, you can tell them apart through a 50/50-principle. Meaning; after one track, there’s another with the aforementioned characteristics, which change rapidly from the first-mentioned claustrophobia, urban decay, colorlessness – to the less harsh and less industrialized landscape of reverberated sound. The industrialized tracks sometime border to harsh noise, without being an embodiment of it at all – at least not to the fullest extent. Acting as a barrier between the general experimentalism of noisiness, and harsh noise as such. Due to the fact that he utilizes the experimentalism that makes German Army a floating experiment per se – makes it hard to categorize what shouldn’t be categorized. But we humans need an explanation as to what we’re actually listening to, which is hard to do when you come across something like this. Actually deciphering this wall of menacing, and possibly “heard before” sound, without making any pointers to what actually can be experienced through their sound – is hard enough. I advise you to listen to it, at least, because it’s magnificent with its all-out chilling influence, on the mind. The release can be bought from A Giant Fern Records, in the physical shape of a 180g LP.

Stream: Group Rhoda – 12th House

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I know that it has already been streamed before, countless times. But it’s time for me to admit that I began to have a liking for Group Rhoda, even though I’ve only heard “12th House“, so far. I found out about Mara Barenbaum through Max and Mara, the interesting co-operation between her and Max Brotman – that is due to come out this month on Dark Entries Records. Even though I’ve already written about Max and Mara, I wanted to take a listen to “12th House”, which is the latest album by Group Rhoda – a solo-project courtesy of Mara Barenbaum. It’s also her second album, as “Out Of Time – Out Of Touch” was the first release under this alterego, put out by the label Night School in 2012. These intriguing melodies that spring from what is a 8-tracked album became too overwhelming. Accompany that with a sullen voice, partaking in the melodic and more anthemic rhythms – made into a potpurri of genres. I must say that I’m more fond of the darker tones in the B-side of this album then anything, but I’m happily seduced by the subliminal rhythmic tantrum that is being sparked throughout these songs. By far, the song “Dust” have me entangled in a psychotic synthesized tango, which I recant for myself as I bob my head to the wonderful elements of the song. I’m not sure about you, but I feel like Group Rhoda is a more subliminally militant dose of synthesizer delight than I could’ve ever imagined. Some aspects of Group Rhoda actually remind me of Tredje Mannen, a synth-pop group that existed in Sweden from 1982-1988. A video can be found below.

The name itself, could mean everything from “a group of roses” – to a minor character in the New Testament, a biblical figure, a servant in the house of Mary. But I’m not the one to speculate, and frankly, I couldn’t give a toss about it. Or maybe I could, because I keep thinking to myself what it could mean. As I make up analogies in my head, as the music paint picturesque and overtly nostalgic images in my head. Anyway, I suggest that you take a listen to it, because it might be one of the greatest albums of this year. I’m not simply saying that because I have to, but because I became seduced once I listened to it. If I can find at least one, two or three favorite tracks on an album – it becomes a clear contender. I don’t want to like everything about it, I simply want to be seduced by something in it. By the way, the wonderful cover was created by Mary Elizabeth Yarbrough. Now you can stream it down below and make up your mind, or get a copy digitally, as well as physically – from Not Not Fun Records.

Spotlight: Black Baron – Divine Chains

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I don’t know where they’re from, but I’m guessing America, which is right – since they’re from Hamilton. If you notice their dialect. On the Victim House-label, two days ago, Black Baron released a four-tracked album on cassette. An album titled “Divine Chains“, with agony channeled through a modest landscape of “dream”-punk and post-punk. One thing to note is their wonderful melodies, which sure are apt to be described as just dreamy. Which gives the “dream”-punk title more justice. Everything from the agonized vocals to the earnest intentions of the music, are incredible. They’re not the stiff incarnation of unoriginal post-punk that have been flooding the gates lately, because they’re kind of doing their own things, which gives a lot of pleasure to your ears. Instead of listening to the recanting of dozen post-punk bands out there. With their tracks “The Twisting Fate Of Future Years“, “The Cold Fluorescent Light Of Blinding“, “Divine Chains” and “(Outro)” – they deserve a place amongst the more original in these years. Thanks for not budging, thanks for creating something of your own. Stream the whole ordeal down below, listen to it, and buy their cassette from Victim House if you like it.

Some questions for Michael Thiel from Weyrd Son Records!

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Michael Thiel is the son of the man that was Snowy Red, whose name was Marcel Thiel. With the first release coming out from his newly started label, Weyrd Son Records, which was a tribute to Snowy Red by a multitude of synth-artists – his label became a part of what might be a future legacy. This son of Belgium is the sole proprietor of the label, and he makes everything work. Since he shaped the idea for the label back in 2012, it started to become a real label when the compilation “_ever Alive – a tribute to Snowy Red” was released in May, 2013. Which had the catalog-number WyS-001. I’m all about this label, so I sent Michael some questions about it, hinting on future releases, the symbolic nature of the first compilation, the artists featured on his label – and much more. Tune in for another questionnaire, that is simply too great to be overlooked. At least if you ask me, but I hope you’ll enjoy reading it.

Your label is pretty new, since it’s only been around since the late December of 2012, from what I’ve noticed. The first release, the tribute to Snowy Red, seems to have been a huge success. What was it like in the process of starting your label?

– Indeed. I officially announced the creation of Weyrd Son Records around late December 2012. A full tribute album to Snowy Red already crossed into my mind a while ago, but it was in the morning of a day in April that I clearly stated; that from that day on, I would work seriously on that first release. I had a few band names in mind, but for some reason I thought it would be quite hard to find a record label that might be interested to release a records with so many “new bands”. I didn’t want anyone to impose any bands or artists I wouldn’t work with, so I immediately thought I would do everything by myself and create my own brand to have a full control of that project.

How hard was it to gather all these artists for this huge compilation?

– I would be lying to say it was a piece of cake doing this. The most difficult part was to be sure I would receive all the tracks on time, which didn’t happen. It takes a lot of energy to give everyone the same motivation that you have yourself. They were of course motivated, but as long as the project is not 100% theirs, you can’t really expect for them to be involved in it – as much as you are. I mean, from that morning of April 2012, I decided to dedicate the biggest part of my time to everything related to the compilation. All those great artists have their own life, their own music and duty, it’s a normal thing – that they would put me on hold for some days. Plus, I didn’t want to push them too much, because I wanted them to take the time they would need to do what they do, in the best of ways. I guess I was just too confident about the deadline. Now I know what it’s like, for the forthcoming releases.

I’m just guessing that you are the brother of Marcel Thiel, so it seems pretty obvious why a tribute to Snowy Red was the first release. Was this a symbolic act for you in honor of his memory?

– Micky Mike was my dad.

It’s true, I didn’t want anything else to come out first on the label. It was at first pretty symbolic, indeed. I had already experienced such a workload three years ago when I was in charge with the art direction of the 5 LP boxset of Snowy Red that got released on Onderstroom. I insisted to do the artwork, and write the text for the whole booklet, so what I did was to get in touch with everyone who was close to my dad and worked with him; photographers, musicians, make-up artists, film makers, sound engineers, friends, etc. I then started to interview them all and my whole work was based on what I’ve learned about him. It was my way to get closer to my dad and to his music, I guess. I was only 4 when the first Snowy Red record came out. Of course I knew all the records by heart already, but I needed to have another approach towards the music and the artist himself. I used to listen to the whole discography while working on the designs and texts. It was pretty inspiring and I did exactly the same thing this time, with the tribute album. Every time I discovered a new facet of Snowy Red, and even more now when other people are playing it.

You’ve got a lot of artists featured on your “roster”, which is pretty weird since the label is very new. Since you aim on giving them total artistic freedom, would that be why they’ve joined up with Weyrd Son Records?

– I can’t really speak for them, but it’s true that I to give the artists 100% control of what they work on for Weyrd Son Records. I really think giving everyone the space they need is the best way to get great things in return. I would never tell anyone “hey, you should sound more like this or that”, or: “that voice part should better be done this way instead”. Who am I to pretend that I know better than themselves, in what their true musical personality is?

Are you the only guy working with the label, and how much time does it consume from your everyday life?

– I’m officially the only person involved, as I’m the only one making the decisions in the end. But there are a few people around me like friends, my sister and my girlfriend, who are giving their opinion – or simply giving me advice. But there’s always one person that is constantly around that I speak a lot with. I would say that it helps me to understand what people are waiting for, what kind of things they would expect from a label. I don’t really buy everything he’s saying, but at least it’s really interesting to hear someone else’s point of view.

Since you’ve already revealed what you’re going to release on your label, both for me and Radio Campus, I was wondering if there’s something you’d like to cover about these releases that haven’t already been said?

– So far, I haven’t really been talking about the fifth release, which I know is some kind of event. It’s about a fresh new band out of the LA-scene. Their name is High-Functioning Flesh, consisting of the duo Susan Subtract (Branes), and Gregory Fronczak. They released a four-tracked tape four months ago and the whole synth-scene in LA went into a mini-blast. I immediately fell in love with them, and I’m counting them in amongst my future projects, which is truly my biggest pride.

Have there been any other labels that you’ve taken influence from, when you decided to start up your label?

– I guess that every single label that has a true and strong personality has or had an influence on me. They are most of the time pretty different, musically speaking, to what I tend to work on – but things like visual communication or artistic coherence are always good lessons to get influenced by. Sometimes I listen to every single artist or record that the label is showing to the world. My interest for a label is sometimes as strong as for music itself. To speak more about the ones that impacted me greatly, I would say that the following three, were those responsible of influencing me: Ideologic Organ (a sublabel of Mego), Sacred Bones Records and Sige. I truly love their artists, but I’d say that it’s pretty far from what I’m working with, musically. But I admire how coherent they are, and the quality of their products, design and inventiveness.

What kind of artists and bands have gotten in contact with you, besides those that are already confirmed?

– Actually, Marburg, the Polish band that is on the tribute to Snowy Red, have gotten in contact with me. There have been a few, mostly doing synth music, of course. But the one I got the biggest interest for was a band doing some true rock’n’roll music. It kinda reminded me of POP 1280, which I ‘m quite a big fan of. I hope I won’t sound like an asshole, but I don’t really like the exercise of being contacted by bands. The reason is that most of the time people aren’t really fitting my vision of what I want to work on. But if I like their stuff, I’m always ready to help.

As a celebratory gesture, you also released the mixtape “The Weyrd Dig Nasty” – celebrating the release of your label. Did it live up to your objective of the label?

– That mixtape was a way for me to put something out that was related to the label, with almost all the artists involved in the tribute, being featured on it. I wanted to give an overview of what Weyrd Son Records was all about, at least for the next few months of action.

When thinking about the label itself, how much response have you gotten from people since the start?

– I got lots of great response so far. Both from the artists I’m working with and people who have heard about Weyrd Son Records, that purchased the first release. Those great comments are making me thinking this was definitely the right move, and certainly the best thing I’ve ever started.

If you got to pick for yourself, what kind of artists or bands would you like to have on your label as a complement?

– Oh, wow. There are so many. There are awesome new bands that I really love, like BOAN, Ssleeperhold and Keluar..They’re all releasing their first record this year on great labels. But if I had to pick some names among confirmed artists, I would say Mushy, Lebanon Hanover and Scorpion Violente. Also, if we were to speak of other music that can’t be fitted into what kind of genres I deal with, I’d say that Chelsea Wolfe, who’s become my biggest musical crush since a decade ago. Or, if we move in the periphery, Eyvind Kang, if we’re going to speak of someone who blew my mind for the last two years.

Since your label is an independent one, are you going to expand in any direction or keep it smaller?

– I’m really not thinking about the possibility to expand. Plus, I think that it would be a mistake. I don’t want to loose a dimension that works, which makes me so happy right now. What I like here is that I have a privileged relationship with everyone, and with the bands. I also try to have a great contact with the customers by replying to every single request or remark. It takes time, but it gives me a really strong feeling to read that someone’s happy, from having a nice reply in the mail. I guess that only I will do for now. As long as I can do everything by myself, I will.

When you package things, they seem luxurious. Do you devote a lot of time to make it unique?

– I don’t think they’re so luxurious right now. But I guess what you could say is that I want them to be more and more luxurious. I’d like to make even more beautiful packages. But that takes so much time, because mostly I have to ship forty copies in a day.

The general aesthetics of Weyrd Son Records seem to be somewhat  industrially influenced, but also minimalistic. Where do you seek your inspiration for that?

– Graphic design is one of my biggest passions. I studied fine arts at school and I used to be really inspired by ancient Japanese art and paintings. Mostly because they use space and “visual silence” as a dialogue with forms and colors. The purity of a line, and of a shape is important to me, as they’re much like a signature. It’s also true that there’s something “industrial” about it, like the logo I created, and the colors I use. I want it to be something in between old fashioned and contemporary – but always classy.

Alright, it’s time to wrap up. What’s going to happen in the coming months?

– The next six months will be pretty busy, filled with lots of surprises. I just sent the artwork and mastering for the second release to the pressing plant, which is the Mushy/Meddicine split EP. It is a re-release on vinyl of the split tape that got released a year ago on Meddicine’s own label Sixsixsixties Records. Then there will be another reissue that will see the light of day around September. Which is the Linea Aspera 3-tracked EP. They released the amazing tape “II” right before they split up. It got sold out almost immediately and I was so pissed off that I missed it. The artwork of that one will be pretty special, but I won’t say too much about it now. The fourth release, that will actually have the catalog number WyS-003 is a three-EP boxset of White Horse. It’s the solo project of Ben Chisholm, who’s a full time member of Chelsea Wolfe’s band. He recently changed the name of White Horse into Revelator, but since he created all that music under the name of White Horse, we both agreed it was better to keep it under that name. This masterpiece in three volumes is titled “The Revenant Gospels”. Haunting and haunted.

I’ve know this music for two years now. I’ve been waiting for someone to release it, and for me to have the chance to hold a copy of it in my hands. But for some reasons that puzzles me, regarding the so outstanding quality of it, it never happened. But I’m ultimately happy that no-one did, because I’m so proud being part of this. And the fifth release will be a six-tracked EP from High-Functioning Flesh. The band that I was talking about earlier.

Listen to the tribute compilation for Snowy Red, that was released by Weyrd Son Records some time ago, down below.

Spotlight: Various Artists – _ever Alive – a tribute to Snowy Red

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I just thought I had to push for this compilation, because it’s awesome. A truly great one, which is a tribute to Snowy Red, which was the moniker for Marciel Thiel. One of the more influential artists within the minimal synth genre. This release feature a lot of the up and coming people, mainly from America, whom have contributed a whole lot to their own scene. But there are also a lot of artists from other parts of the world. The following are represented: Bestial Mouths, //TENSE//, Strange Powers, Mushy, Violet Tremors, Mirror Mirror, Meddicine, Nové Můra, Jessy Champagne, Revelator, Freddy Ruppert, Animal Bodies, Newclear Waves, Safyée, Led Er Est, Bright Future, Marburg and Deathday. So, it’s jam-packed with the best of the best, covering songs from albums like “Snowy Red“, “The Right To Die“, “Vision” and “The Beat Is Over“. Meaning; virtually every album he ever released. It’s inspiring to hear such a flawless re-interpretation of those legendary songs. All from different areas of the minimal synth sound. This is surely an investment, as you get a gatefolded double-LP, 180 gram, with hand-numbered packages limited to 500. You’ll can get this for twenty-two euros, and you really should, because it’s a great release. It’s also the first release on Weyrd Son Records (WyS-001), but surely not the last. Artwork was made by Betsy VanLangen.