Listen: mar, Hanetration, TRBL

marwho

Nice, unpretentious and skewed electronic music from Marta aka mar, in the shape and form of a distant feeling of being disconnected but at the same time warmth and comfort, with “who?” she conveys a sense of aesthetically fulfilled beauty in terms of music – and an uneasiness that lingers throughout – you’re always unsure and on the edge, as you’re caressed by whoever you think about right now.

Somewhat nostalgic, a big chunk of unorthodox but well-produced electronica aligned with stiff beats – and a sweet compromise together with non-electronic music. There’s sincerity to the music and not the usual poseur trapped within their confinements of wanting to be “outside the box”, and this is what separates mar from other projects that might sound like this, though being as young as she is – only 23 – makes it more impressive and you should take time out of your day, evening or night to listen to this.

You can stream her song “who?” down below, via Soundcloud. Hopefully we’ll hear more from her in the future, it would be intriguing if she accentuated her own vocals and made that a prime focus, it would enhance the overall sound and definitely pit her against the more well-versed people within experimental electronica, as she’s talented.

hanetrationancients

The one-man show I truly admire is Hanetration, his work ethic when it comes to music surpasses many musicians, and he carefully hones his craft to get better and better at it – so with “Ancients EP” – he delves deeper into the different elements: Water, Fire, Air, Earth and Aether. It encompasses each element beautifully and it sounds just like what you would expect from the name, an atmosphere which keeps you in and gets you out of your mind as quickly as possible.

There is something otherworldly to his music, which is obvious for anyone who’s listened to this first releases. What we’re looking for in this is something that keeps it all together, and in that he’s succeeded – as his earlier releases tended to be inspired by all and nothing at the same time – a whirlwind of creative outputs, now distilled into a more headstrong, ambitious image of himself and his music.

It is not something one would listen to regularly, but it is soothing in a way and calms your nerves. We’re blessed to have such a wide array of different influences peeking through, making themselves noticed through small cracks in the layers of each of the songs, our favorite being the constantly pulsating song “Air“. You can listen to his latest EP down below.

trblsleepinducer

Now time for some intensity, with TRBL and the release “Sleep Inducer“, you get pumping techno, industrial and seriously nostalgic rave sounds all in one. Even though it is close to being a gimmick, there’s a certain vibe to it that separates it from being a full-frontal assault and a clone, which can be hinted in the carefully placed synthesizer stabs here and there, and the breakdowns which slowly turns things on their head.

Perplexed” is one of our favorite songs, a fast-paced beast of a song that is so acidic you’d have to turn up in a Hazmat suit even to be able to dance to this – bordering happy hardcore territory – yet keeping the trance and rave atmosphere intact, without going overboard with the influences. What’s great about the first track, the title track “Sleep Inducer“, is that it reflects a lot on the more sinister themes that can be put into techno, there’s a darker vibe to it, maybe not as hardcore as the other tracks – but something is lurking down below.

Simply put – this is something you should get your hands on, despite only being in a digital format. It is well-produced and carries everything on its own, despite being only three tracks – though all are different variations of the same theme, derived from different times and compiled into three sections – techno with industrial overtones, techno/trance with rave overtones – and a more psychedelic acid techno experience. Listen to it in full down below.

 

Advertisements

Listen: Halvtrak – Dust Under Bridges (Appendix I/​II)

0002566920_10

You shouldn’t be afraid of house and techno. That is the message that Don’t Be Afraid sends, a label that is based out of the UK whose specialization lies within leftfield house and techno. Having released their first 12¨ vinyl with Semtek‘s (Benjamin Roth) mini-album “Bells / Tower / Key” in 2010 – continuing with the single “Idiotland“, the mini-album “Lotos Eaters” – finishing the streak with him when “West Acyd Shelter” came out. After that, Mr. Beatnik (Nick Wilson) got his mini-album “Synthetes” released, following up with yet another Semtek-release – which ended 2011. In 2010, they only released Semtek. Since then, they’ve put out releases with everyone from MGUN, Alis, Claws For? to Kelpe, four different compilations as Spargel Trax Vol. 1-4, Disco Nihilist and Neville Watson. Now we’re suddenly in 2013. Since then, there haven’t really been anything released by Don’t Be Afraid. We’re about to change that perception and so are they, as Halvtrak returned since his first and only EP titled “Dust Under Bridges EP“. Basically a nostalgic follow-up whose post-mortem got re-released.

0002566921_10

His newly released “Dust Under Bridges (Appendix I/II)” on Don’t Be Afraid, are nine tracks that serve as an appendage for his EP that was released last year. These tracks are basically the remnants of what that was recorded back then, nine tracks which Henri Puolitaival (Halvtrak) deemed to not be worthy of release. They had previously been recorded onto tape by himself, but had never been officially released. Since they originally were released on cassette, Don’t Be Afraid set their mission straight, and released it as a limited edition cassette two days ago. I believe that when I hear these tracks, I can not help but bob my head to the wondrous melodies, the clingy atmosphere and the continually aggressive tempo. Some tracks are more timid, whilst others bring an almost acidic mixture to his technotic house. You’ll be hypnotized by the string of beats that are dragged along by a spaced out landscape of sound. It’s calling for you, calling you to your homeland – in the sky. Sometimes the sheer primitiveness haunt these tracks, as they begin to evolve into something bigger than thou, finalizing the fine atmospheres that is his creation. You can stream and listen to the whole release down below, and you can buy the cassette from Don’t Be Afraid.

Review: Női Kabát – Make Room! Make Room!

a1212866862_10Női Kabát have been on the tapestry for a long time, and I am about to disseminate why this might be a classic with longevity, already. Their first release on aufnahme + wiedergabe, titled “Make Room! Make Room!” features two tracks which I’m going to delve into. I’ve listened to both for a long time and haven’t made up my mind if I really wanted to review it. But here it comes, nevertheless.

When you get into it for the first time, the title-track “Make Room! Make Room!” is the first one to loudly come into the picturesque urban sound-scape, with swirling synthesizers and determined drumming. A ravingly good thing is that they manage to set the mood for the track already in the beginning, as the introductory phase of the song isn’t a pain to listen to or get into. Everything seems to be carefully planned out and set in stone, as they move us into it with a groove that could seldom be heard anywhere – or anyhow – in a setting like this, as our modern world seem to have swallowed most of the retro-fantastic vibes they continually deliver in the introduction. Once the characteristics of the song begin to form themselves, they take the shape of a unimaginable synthesizer that sweeps the floor with my emotions. It’s like you’re being swept away by the callousness of the waves that pulsate through your eardrums, as each hit of the synthesizers magical keys seem to be done with ultimate passion. At the same time that it brings dismay to the table, it also brings an angelic touch that is affecting your own logical dissemination. The sound itself re-sounds through layers of drums, that are being assaulted with impudence. These blows that are delivered are perfectly matching the irreversibly tasteful harmonics that let you acknowledge the vibes that are roaring, throughout. When listening to it, you don’t notice the vocals all that much, as you are too enthralled by the environmentally sonic wonderland that is manifesting itself to the highest degree. But that does not take away the importance of Dee Rüsche, whom does an outstanding job at accompanying this perfected toxin that is simply moving outwardly towards you, lunging at you with the painful reminder of total urban decay.

His vocals are filled with passion, as he sinks his virtual teeth into you for a clinging bite that will absolve your cadaverous existence. He is the total reminder of what their quest seem to be, to remind us of what’s actually happening beside us at this moment. Well, it helps to actually know of this so called “mission“, if it actually is one. But one can read their almost apocalyptic turn in the song into this particular subject. It is pretty obvious what the influence might or might not be, but the emotions that this song bring forth in a human being is so remorseless that it isn’t even funny. If anything at all, this song is the pure anthem for Női Kabát. It is their shell, their core – if you will. The further you get into it, the more disgruntled you’d be. As the sonic landscape shift in between hard-hitting drums, fierce and uncontrollable synthesizers, into a more angelic and spiritual voyage that seems to be there to put you to sleep. Not because it is boring, but because every single nerve in your body is hurting. I can’t actually think of anything that is bad about this song, because everything is so perfected – yet so imperfect at the same time. A balance that is hard to actually allow oneself to follow, but I’d imagine that it would’ve taken time. One can actually, for once imagine – that it’s a mold that is not to be re-used once again. They’ve already done their best to shape it into what it’s become, a taste for music, at the same time a taste of reality. A reality I would like to be a part of. There’s no reason to not actually have this song on a list somewhere, maybe even a top-10. What they’ve done here is a reminder of what people should do more often; build up their own room in this world, so make room for Női Kabát.

As if something hasn’t been described enough, we must sadly depart from that wonderful song and make our way to “Industry“, which is the song on the B-side of this 7¨. It feels like it was a good idea to put this song on that side, because it is much harsher and lack a lot of what they delivered with the first song. It sounds like they’ve given up, which is frankly what they’re doing with this song. The metaphysics are colliding with the idea of themselves, which isn’t good at all, because the metaphysics is exactly what makes Női Kabát so great in the first place. But their approach here is more minimal and less bombastic, which takes away a lot from the mixture that could make the track a lot better. Even though it becomes more bombastic in the middle, as the chorus wails into place, it saves the song as such. The rest of it is just a pure mess which most of those that like the more minimalistic touches that they deliver, will froth over and defend to the last man. I actually abhor everything else on the track when I hear the spastic synthesizers coming in and the continual rhythm that is turned on, which makes me check my pulse, as it pulsates to the motion of “Industry“. But in no way can it match the first song on this 7¨, because a lot of their passion seemed to have went into the first song.

Even though some of the passion is returned in the end, it doesn’t make up for some of the wasted seconds that could’ve went into a more passionate landscape of sound. Somehow, it feels like they’ve inverted everything they once held true with the first track, like they’re rebelling against their self. Putting a megalomaniac at the helm, touching us a last time with their quirky synthesizer-laden mattress, telling us to fear not – because they will be back in one shape or another. If you view it as that, much of it makes even more sense. An experimental move to say “sayonara!“, as the ship is sinking into the wreck of humanity – as the oil is spilling over; as we ignite it. Though it has its moments, it doesn’t really recover, but the end is so incredibly alarming that even those of you that have no pulse, must be shaken to your knees. Which is certainly one of the other good parts about this song, but it doesn’t make it into my harbor, at least. I’d rather see the ship sinking with it’s captain, just so he can save the crew and fade away into the blurred ocean – with dignity. However you choose to view this release, it has already become a classic amongst a lot of people. It’s a shame that it hasn’t reached more people, because it has to. Whether you like it as a whole, or simply one song, it is a landmark for the electronic genre as such and music as a whole. Probably one of the best records released this year, even though some of it really doesn’t make it ashore. They’ve made their mark, which should honor them, and more people need to delve into it. Take it, or leave it – because it’s going to be your last chance.

Interview with Jen Ellerson of Modern Movement!

324777_10150904115725727_1269492017_o

Modern Movement is a project that was jumpstarted by Jen Ellerson, back in 2010. She wanted to capture a movement that she’d seen rising in Berlin, which was limited to eclectic and nocturnal sub-cultures within this specific region of Germany. Mainly ranging from cold wave to other obscure sounds. Those that are involved with the project, describe themselves as “a collective of ambitious, international misfits with irreproachable taste“. So, when this concept first set out to do something, it was by putting up club-nights that would fuse together the potential she saw in Berlin. Garnering a lot of momentum from her previous (and still current) project Brave Exhibitions, which is about the same thing, but not really. It’s based out of London, but it’s focused within a similar scene. She’s been running it together with James Lowry for some time now. Anyway, since club-nights only and installations at that, didn’t really pinpoint what was happening around her, she sketched out an idea for a book in 2011. This later on formed into a bigger project, which would come out in 2013 and also include a compilation of tracks to accompany the book itself. Like a soundtrack for everything that’s been gathered around. There’s a lot to say about Jen Ellerson, and she’s got a lot of experience within multimedia as such, but hopefully this interview will clear up a lot of question-marks. I asked her about the book, the idea behind it, Brave Exhibitions, Modern Movement, what it was like coming to Berlin, how Berlin differs from London and much more. I’m hoping that you’ll find this informative and enjoyable, and I hope that some of you actually recognize yourselves as part of this story.

Continue reading

Interview with Tony Drayton of Kill Your Pet Puppy!

kyppcov1

The first Kill Your Pet Puppy, released in the borderland between 1979-1980.

Kill Your Pet Puppy is a zine from London, England. It’s got a lot of history to be backed up with, and might actually be called legendary. One of the men behind it all, or should we call him the ‘main man’, Tony Drayton – left his former zine Ripped & Torn to create this one. As the first issue emerged in 1979, it featured; Bauhaus, Crass, The Mob, Sex Gang Children, Southern Deathcult, The Associates, The Ants and Alien Sex Fiend. Including articles, in a range of topics from “Magick and Anarchy”, “In Praise of Stupid Songs”, “Gay Punks”, “Sid Vicious Memorial Day”, joined by “issues” such as feminism, squatting and the occult. Well, this was the first number of KYPP, and more were to come. It got distributed by Joly MacFie from Better Badges, and came out in six numbers from the years of 1979 to 1983. Even though countless things can be said about this zine, and its continual twelve writers from the joint group called ‘The Puppy Collective‘, whereas some of the members were; Alastair Livingstone, Kilty McGuire, Cory Spondence, Jeremy Gluck and Val Not-A-Puppy – nothing can be said better than by the man himself; Tony Drayton. Therefore, I sent a couple of questions to him, which turned out to give a lot of answers, as each answer tells a story in itself. So, I hereby welcome you to read the pretty long interview with Tony Drayton, about the Kill Your Pet Puppy-zine and things along the line of 1979-1983.

Continue reading

Spotlight [SP. ED]: A New Life / Soft Riot!

boom

Russia wouldn’t be my main vantage point if I think about retro-fantastic synth-pop and minimal synth. Obviously, Los Angeles have been in the headlights for far too long, even though they have some merits to withhold that certain degree of appreciation. However, it seems like the Russian label-boss have been at it, at least if you check out Other Voices Records, whom we’ve interviewed earlier on this blog. Taking influences both from legendary groups such as Human League, and specifically; Soft Cell – there’s a resurgence that simply can’t be ignored. We’ll see if any other label from that particular region of the world are up for the challenge, but it seems like they’re the number one contenders so far. To be noted, the artists themselves aren’t from this region, but the mastermind is the Russian label. In this special edition of Spotlight, I’ll guide you to the two gems “Fright †reasures” and “Your Own Private Underworld“. Courtesy of A New Life and Soft Riot, one Italian-based producer and one UK-based producer of synth-pop music, with the word “retro” in the mainline.

1481648355-1What can possibly be said about A New Life and his newly released cassette titled “Fright †reasures“? Firstly, it’s based off material that was recorded in 2011-2012, by the synth-pop producer Maurizio Pustianaz. Besides the obvious fact that it’s retro all over, there’s also the importance of analogue. Smearing our brains with a current of force, but at the same time also a sincere yearning for times that have past. The music itself strays from synth-pop, to minimal synth and he delves into the 80’s – with good intent. His abysmal fascination for that decade, is preceded by the apparent structure of the songs, whom in their natural state reveal much of the influences. But they are pretty unconventional – and are only matched, when it comes to superiority, by the fast-paced sections of synthesizer goodness. Some of the ambitious hints of melodic content, are sometimes not his strength when it comes to the music. The weird, showcased melodies in the choruses don’t intertwine in a good way, within the context that is intended – of the structured colossus that is his sound. Which at times actually can be turned in his favor, since the music itself relies on the ambitious notion and atmospheric experimentalism that is rarely seen within this decade. Sure, if you’re interested in Soft Cell, their experimentation seem to be a guideline for his music. But when it comes to the regular synth-pop, with 80’s vibes, this is not something for the faint of heart or primitive minds. No, this sounds like an intellectual approach to an otherwise pretty basic genre, at least if you gather up all your synth-pop belongings and heed to the overall quality. Catchy, it is and can be when he lets it form around the strengths that emit throughout the often heartbreaking lyrical content, but not to an extent that is in his favor. Since the vocals are 50/50, they’re just too much in some of the songs, but at the same time add up in the end – which makes this a case of how you’d like the lyricism to be. When he sings from his heart, the music itself is energized and should re-conquer the castle it needs to forcefully re-take. Otherwise, when it comes to the overall picture, it’s a picturesque cassette which needs to be listened to. At least if you compare it to the not-so-stiff competition out there.

1006979070-1As you listen to Soft Riot, which is a moniker for another UK-based producer, who goes by the name of JJD (Jack Duckworth) – there’s an instant appeal to your own monotonic glory. His single-based release “Your Own Private Underworld“, from his forthcoming cassette “Fiction Prediction“, is a fusion between the minimal synth landscape, of dark intentions morphed into a kind of shallow Miami synth-pop sound. There’s a glimmering haze around the general atmosphere of the song, along with almost atonal sounds with monotonic intentions. The contradictions that feed off this sound is astonishing. No cliches are being re-interpreted into the shrewd landscape of ludicrousness, angelic dismay and sincere synthesizers. If anything, this is simply a display of utter originality. Quenching the thirst for some post-punk, by squeezing some influences from that pathway – into an all-out electronic endeavor. At times, the vocals and the interchangeable nature of the music, reminds you all too much about the totally non-electronic band Lebanon Hanover. The kind of dry atmosphere of aridity is utilized as a kind of undertone, which is absurd when blended with the glamor in the overlying parts of the songs structures. It’s odd, but it’s actually one of the better blends of minimal synth, with irregular influences, that has a more static synth-pop ground to stand on – which in the end actually works. Since there’s only two songs, as this is a part of a forthcoming cassette, I am dismayed. Not because anything is bad about it, it’s just because there are only two songs so far – and I want him to get on with it and deliver the rest of them. The urge that simply walks into your brain and make your hands click on the mouse-button, just so you can hear the songs on repeat. Really great songs, original and unique in so many ways. This is a cassette that you simply have to listen to. You should wait until the forthcoming cassette and whole album “Fiction Prediction” comes out, but I urge you to buy the digital download of these two songs – right now!

Harvesting #10: We’ve come so far with New Ideals! [Part I]

I started up Harvesting as a source of renewal. What inspired me to start Harvesting was the fact that I’ve tried everything else and I wanted to break free. So I started it up and reckoned I needed a name first, so I came up with the name “Harvest” as it symbolizes what I do when I search for music. I look for it online and Harvest what I think is worthy of a place in it. But then I decided to change the name to “Harvesting“, because that’s something you actively do, as opposed to harvest (which you’ve already done). My original thought was to only let the “best of the best” have some space in the edition to begin with, even though I after the first three decided to let loose on the genres and be a little bit more inclusive. Thanks to everyone that read it and appreciated it, I must say that it became a huge success. Which means that I will be keeping Harvesting running on an (almost) day-to-day basis. The second most important thing about it is that great people, be it bands, artists of any kind, clubs or record-labels – everyone has a place, if you’re insignificant enough. That, in turn, doesn’t mean that you don’t do anything great. It just means that you’re unpopular in today’s mainstream society and it means that I have to shed a light on you. If you’re interested in being featured here yourself, don’t hesitate to contact me.

In this edition of Harvesting you’ll get to meet the following: BRANES, Moral Hex, Rule Of Thirds, New Ideals and Momentform. In other words, you’ll get a lot of bang for your buck. Since this is free and all. Hope you enjoy it even more this time around. You’ll also get a closer relationship with New Ideals and Momentform, since I’ve asked them a few questions.

Branes – Perfection Condition

An interesting duo which seem to lay more emphasis on their aesthetics than anything else. But I’m interested in the music at hand, and it sounds pretty funny. I don’t know if that was their intention, but their music sounds like a mix of sarcasm, death rock and synth-pop. The first song “Veronica Box Lunch” is a great insight into the most underrated death-rock, with a slice of intriguing and dark synth-pop. Since they hop in between a lot of genres, one of the more appreciative things they’ve done is the vocals. It’s got the theatrical and enthralling sound of the old-school, but at the same time a little bit of dark cabaret sliding in between. Rhythmically, it’s a monster, that just plows through you with the force of ingeniousness. Even though some of the songs can be a bit boring at times, the up-tempo pop-song “Abracadaver” bring a smile to my face each time.

It feels as if I’m being shown a hysterical show that tries to employ everything they’ve ever learned, at the same time. I believe that there’s a more humorist touch to their album more than anything else, because everything seems a tad too dis-organized. But I think they’ve got something going for themselves that could develop into something even better. The last song on this album, titled “Ramsey in the Dark” is one of the better songs on the album. A genuine slab of dark-wave angst, accompanied by quirky rhythms and weird melodies. Sounding like a robot in between and developing into a hysterical piece of art.

Buy their album over at their bandcamp and finance their continual absurdity. Oh, yeah, the digital-only version costs about 8 dollars. I believe it’s only released as a digitally-only download thing, since they ain’t got it in their shop. But you could snoop around, because there’s t-shirts and their first album also. There’s also a possibility to download the songs individually, for free.

Moral Hex – S/T 12¨

Apparently, there’s so much great goth rock and death-rock out there, it’s a shame that I didn’t find it earlier. This piece of interesting anarcho-punk mixed with goth rock, is what I’m going to listen my ears off to. First song “Corporate” is a battle between the drums, galloping away, along with a nice goth-sounding baseline. Accompanied by sincere guitar-riffs in the background and an obligatory vocalist that sounds like any older goth rock band. Even though they have a lot of influences on the side of goth rock, it’s obvious that punk is getting the firmer handshake this time around. I like the speedy, yet static tempo that fuels the sound-scape. The lyrics are also a stark reminder of what kind of world we live in and how it’s operated. Second song “Constant Regret” is a more vaudevillian kind of song, with high ambitions of being the melodic wonder you’d invite to your back alley for a live session. With nice drumming and a tempo that’s a little bit more compromised, just to suit the general mood of the sound-scape.

A kind of scaled-down version of the first song, but with its own touch and reigns to hold by. It seems like it slows down even more, the further in you get on the album itself. The third song “Behind the Mask“, is a masterpiece in itself. Employing some of the almost pop-oriented vocals, surfacing amongst a sound-scape that utilizes the best of the different instrumentation. A baseline to die for and drumming that is sufficient enough to bear the sound-scape up on its bare shoulders. A great experience of both worlds, whether it’s the punk-oriented side of it or if it’s the goth-oriented side. Both hold a great influence on this band and all their songs. It also feels great to find out that both are as exquisitely expressed as possible. Good riddance.

Buy the album over at their bandcamp for 4.99 dollars as a digital download-only album, or you could venture over to their label Mass Media Records, to look for it. I didn’t find it over there though, so the best would be to get the digital version of it first and then see if they’ve got a physical version available anytime soon.

Rule Of Thirds – DEMO

Tis’ a new addition on the scarce death-rock sky. I chose a lot of death-rock/goth-oriented releases because I wanted to show it to the world. Actually didn’t know they existed, but found out about it some days ago. Been listening to this record since then. The first song “No More Moon” has several strengths that reveal themselves the longer you get into the album, with a relatively repetetive and lo-fi sound-scape they manage to scrape on your inside and figure out which emoticons that need to come out. I felt pretty bedazzled when I listened to this for the first time, I think its ingeniousness in a bottle. Feels like I’m in an abandoned church and hearing the nonliving orchestra playing this tune for me. In the next song on the album, namely “Total Disappointment“, the singer sounds a little bit lite Anja Huwe from X Mal Deutschland. It’s also a little bit more down-tempo than the first song and sounds enthralling to say the least, there’s a pinch of nocturnal-feeling in it too.

As the melody on the guitar sounds completely in touch with the rest of it. One of the later songs on the album, “Northanger Abbey“, gets me everytime. I don’t know if it’s the sincerity in the screechy voice or if it is the stand-by drumming. But everything sounds so bombastic, yet it has that punk-feeling to it, like it’s been done wholly by D.I.Y.-measures and standards. It’s like a chaotic landscape of different instrumentation, that just fights to survive and be included in the wonderful landscape. There’s something dreamy about it, but it’s quite noise-filled. I don’t really know how that combination can be pulled off, but apparently Rule Of Thirds succeeded in doing that, especially with this song. This will be a band that I’ll keep an eye on in the future, because their demo, quite frankly, rocks the socks off me and it’s got that certain feeling that I get when I listen to old goth rock. Surely a keeper and it will probably be with me until they release something new. Hopefully they will, because I would like to see which label that would squander this kind of talent.

So if you want to buy it, you can venture over to their bandcamp as usual. You’ll get a digital-only download for 2.50 AUD, which isn’t that much to be honest. Packed with five songs and the first release this band has given away to the public. But I’m guessing that they only have a digital release because it’s quite a small label to begin with. Major Crimes Records released this pearl on the 22nd of June 2012.

There’s a new label on the rise and it’s name is New Ideals. It’s run by a music-enthusiast by the name of Joe and the label currently resides in London, UK.

Did you have any experience of labels before you started New Ideals, and what’s the main idea behind it?

– New Ideals is the culmination of much daydreaming, which consequently, is also why it has taken me so long to start it. My own views on music are terribly uncompromising so it seemed a natural step to set up a label where I could control every concern. However, it was only when I moved to London a year ago that the idea developed a clear narrative that extended beyond simple musical considerations. Certainly true for our first releases, there exists a critique on ones discordant relationship with the city.

I first approached Ianis from Momentform as their previous releases appeared to portray a similar message, which he confirmed. As we spoke more it became clear that we shared many of the same influences, and happily he agreed that Momentform would provide the debut release from New Ideals. My only useful label experience comes from a thirst to consume as much as I possibly can relating to Factory Records, an undeniable influence.

What kind of music are you specializing in when releasing?

– The label and its collaborators share a belief that music should provoke austere feelings of love and discomfort, a statement we shall be looking to uphold with each and every releases. There is little concern for adhering to a particular genre, however with much of my own musical taste rooted in post-punk, unwittingly, I am sure this will be reflected in many of our releases.

Since you’re from London, could you tell me anything about the climate there? What’s hardest about having a label over there and what challenges do you have in front of you?

– London is an all consuming city, impossible to escape, often exhausting, but ultimately enthralling. As I touched upon earlier, it was only when I moved here that the idea for the label developed a clear focus. At the moment there is a certain sense of dystopia to London, that like much of the world, is currently feeling the full force of austerity. With Momentform and blablarism both based in their respective capital cities, and myself in London, the city is a shared is a shared reference point for us all.

The greatest challenge for the label is ensuring every release gets the exposure its creators so richly deserve. If this happens then everything else will follow.

Are there coming any other releases planned before the end of 2012, and if so, could you tell me anything about them?

– IDEAL 002 will be the debut release from Ukrainian solo artist blablarism, due for release in late November. I can’t reveal too many details at the moment, but the release is similarly informed by living in the city, with Kiev the source of both inspiration and desperation

Thank you for letting me interview you about your label! Say what you want here in the end!

– It has been a pleasure, thank you. Be sure to follow New Ideals as there are some great releases planned in 2013 that we are beyond excited for, including a band who have already appeared on my favorite record label.

Before we get started on the questions I sent to Momentform, I need to emphazise that it’s Ianis Lallemand from the band, answering the questions asked.

Could you tell me anything about the history of the band and when it first started out?

– Momentform started out of discussions with my friend Pierre Suarez in the south of France, in the summer of 2010. I had been playing bass and releasing electronic music for some time; Pierre writes a lot, mostly short and very intense pieces. I was quite tired at this time with the process of producing complex electronic pieces, stuff that usually took me days to complete. I wanted to delve into something much more visceral, something I could write and produce more instinctively – music which could function as snapshots of certain states of mind. It seems to me Pierre’s lyrics respond to the same urge of instantaneous, cathartic expression. Hence it seemed natural to mix my music and his texts.

Although the tracks born from this collaboration where amongst the first to be finished, Pierre vocals only appeared in the second release, Four Days (released in June 2012 by Modern Tapes, Chicago). I see Momentform as an open project – which means that it might also take instrumental forms. However I’m very proud to have Pierre doing its great spoken word vocals once again on Yearn.

You’ve released your first 12¨ on American label WT but now you’ve released on New Ideals – what was the reason for this?

– This wasn’t planed, it just happened out of opportunities. I’m very happy to work with New Ideals. Joe (the label’s owner) is a really nice person and I wish him and his label all the best for the future.

What does the minimal synth genre mean to you?

– Apart from the quality of 80s pastiche that is undeniably has in some extent, I think the sound quality of the genre is particularly relevant to electronic music now as a path out of overly-polished productions, and out of the abstraction of club-oriented music.

Do you have anything else planned for the near future? Anything you could reveal?

– I’m working on a live set that I want to play at very special and intimate occasions. I have a few tracks ready, which are quite different than what I’ve done in the past releases. There are also a few other projects that I cannot reveal yet.

Good thing that you chose Invisible Guy! Or yeah, I chose you. But, what do you have to say here in the end?

– Thanks for the great work you’ve been doing with the blog and the Harvesting series. Thanks to Joe from New Ideals, Patrick from Modern Tapes and William of WT Records for their support!

This is the end of Part I.

Expect Part II to be released on Monday!