Premiere: The Foreign Resort – Dead End Roads [Musicvideo]

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We’re late on a premiere, but it’s beginning to slowly unfold. The Foreign Resort have released a single, as a run-up for their coming tours in Denmark, The Netherlands and USA – this fall. This particular single goes by the name of “Dead End Roads“, and is taken from their forthcoming album, which they have been working on together with the legendary John Fryer. A noticeable difference this time is that they rely on dark and heavy synthesizers to be pushing the sound itself, with a more electronic approach to their music then they usually have. The beginning of the song is absolutely fantastic, but so is the rest of it. But the gritty and adrenaline-filling synthesizer that hits it off, gives a particular sense of suspense. The sound itself is more cold and calculated, as they do not rely that much on their trade mark that is post-rock mixed with post-punk and new-wave. So it’s obvious that a lot of what you’re hearing have been affected by John Fryer’s mixing, producing and engineering. This might just be a temporary thing, just for this album, but I’m currently liking what I’m hearing. It harkens back to some of the legendary bands of yore. But there’s something new and fresh about it. It is deeply emotional, but at the same time on the edge and in the dirt. The music video was directed by Morten Engels Ryming, the actress was styled by Sascha Elvar, and the actress herself is Emilie Flyvholm. With special thanks to Photographica & Henning Ørsted. The single was recorded in the time-span from March to April 2013 – at Black Tornado Studios in Copenhagen. Last but not least, the masterful sound itself was mastered by Chris Cline at Studio Wonder of Sound, in San Antonio, Texas. You can also listen to the track down below, along with two remixes of the same track.

 

Premiere: dead leaf echo – Thought & Language

Never been, but now is. It’s time to premiere a stream for you that just came in, which in turn is dead leaf echo’s debut-LP titled “Thought & Language“. Mixed by John Fryer (4AD/This Mortal Coil/NIN) and mastered by Joe Lamber (School of Seven Bells/Deer Hunter). I must admit, I haven’t been able to pay much attention to this – since I’ve been doing a lot of things lately that have been related to other acts. But since I got this just in time, I had to write something about it. Their debut is somewhere in between new wave, dream pop and shoegaze, with glittery ambiance and joyous shoegazy feelings. Surely, it’ll be the ultimate album to begin spring with, since we haven’t really gotten rid of all the snow yet. There’s a lot of summer in it too, like a seasonal outburst of emotions. Sincere, true to itself, reeking of soft-spoken but subliminal thoughts. Including a colourful palette of differentiated riffs, easy going drums and almost an symbiosis between catchy upbeat and emotional downbeat. Ready to hit it off, but staying with you, since that’s more worth their time. Stream it down below and check out their latest video for the track “Kingmaker“, above.

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Invisible Guy recommends: 80s Gothic Rock – 1985 (Part IV)

I think it’s time to give you another treat, this time I’ll be recommending my favorite Gothic rock bands from the 80s. I begin with 1980-1981 (Part I) and then gradually move my way up throughout the years: 1982 (Part II), 1983-1984 (Part III), 1985 (Part IV), 1986-1987 (Part V) and 1988-1989 (Part VI). I’ll be continuing the fad of six different episodes and I’ll bid you my welcome into the world I knew and the world I’ve discovered and continually re-discover when I’m surfing the web. I want to give people another opportunity and to find out about bands and artists that they haven’t heard of before. Sometimes I occasionally sneak in a bigger band or two, but that’ll just be if the song is good enough. But by no means is this a top 30 of the best Gothic rock from the 80s, I’ll have to give you a top-10 list in the future of the Gothic bands that I think top my own list. I’ll also have some commentary beneath each clip as I had in the earlier parts that covered post-punk, mostly because it looks more aesthetically pleasuring and say something about the song or the lyrics. Let me take you into this world now.

You’re now entering Part IV of the recommendation.

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