Exclusive Premiere: 77™ – She Likes To Watch You (The Horrorist RMX)

mec008cover

A glistening example of how you combine genres for the best result, can be found with the 77™-outfit – a Polish-Danish duo on the edge with their debut-release “Spam“. This duo started out with a live-performance back in 2009 on Christiania’s Open Air birthday party. Christiania is virtually a society within the society of Denmark, located in the borough of Christianshavn, in Copenhagen. Having played in a lot of different clubs and festivals across Scandinavia and Central Europe, it took a whopping five years for them to put out their first album. Comprised of the all too talented Aga Wilk from Poland, whose first and only release, a split with Marburg on the Polish label Oficyna Biedota in 2013it is nice to have seen her venture into this collaboration. On the other hand, Christian Gjelstrup, the Danish native, an interaction designer turned to form this duo.  Now when their album has already been released on the 9th of June, it is a pleasure to be describing what I got to hear from what they’ve put out. The music is everything from dark and shady electronic body music, to the static measurements of techno. When it comes to their own songs and not the remixes, they tend to present a stale and rather amelodic sound. Unhinged female vocals that are almost distorted beyond recognition, together with the steady rhythm of the beats. The remixes, however, lend the expertise from François-Xavier Michel (Millimetric), Andrea Pritschow & Malte Steiner (Das Kombinat) and Oliver Chesler (The Horrorist) – which the album is in dire need of when you’ve listened too much to them – a good complement to the original songs.

Some time ago I got to premiere the best remix. I found that the maniacal turn that The Horrorist gave the track “She Likes To Watch You” was just up my own alleyway. As he contributed with the nocturnal turn á la Oliver Chesler’s own formula. It was enjoyable to listen to it and it became more of an uptempo track stuck in transmission. A looming rhythm that hasn’t got the need to be moved the slightest, besides when it comes to change of melody. Wrenching in his own vision of what 77™ delivered with their original track. So I premiered this track a while ago and it was enjoyed by a lot of people, and I noticed that Oliver himself posted it around before everything was released. I’m afraid that I haven’t really had the tempo I’ve been keeping this year so far, so I’ve fallen behind on most of the stuff I’ve been doing. But here you go, the exclusive premiere of “She Likes To Watch You (The Horrorist RMX)“. You can also listen to the whole album from Mecanica down below, and you can also buy the vinyl-release here and digitally, here.

Review: Die Selektion – Gottes Wille

a0485886211_10Die Selektion have been catering to your dark needs for a while, but whilst that is true, they haven’t really rang a bell over here. It seems like they faded away into the peripheral, as we were to busy with everything else. Since their latest release “Gottes Wille” was put out by aufnahme + wiedergabe not too long ago, we thought that we’d check it out. The title-track “Gottes Wille” has a strong and sturdy introductory, where we delve into the caves of weirdly conjugating synthesizers, as the atmospheric content of darkness embraces us. We do not embrace it, since its in the vile nature of it to do the opposite. That’s what it feels like, an opposition to something. Just don’t be happy, because this atmosphere will choke you by the perfectly laden, almost militaristic instrumental, surrounding the fading core of itself. All that can be heard, after the tempo is upping itself gradually, is: “Der Vatican“, and after that, you simply don’t understand anything – unless you speak German and like everything Germanic. The vocals sound utterly hopeless, and it’s re-enforced by the German language, which can be as soothing as it wants, but also hard in moments of need. Simply astonishing, especially how the laden baselines forcefully blend with the sound of distant trumpets. It doesn’t sound like the 2000’s, but rather a nostalgic piece that trumps everything.

Now, the next track, aptly titled “Faust” – willingly deliver an even more ascendant position into a fraction of the dark mind that is Die Selektion. Here, the atmosphere is secondary, but still a great picturesque and outlandish piece that is placed in the middle. The baseline seem to quench some of the thirst delivered by the other instrumentation. Everything seems detrimental, as every single thread of the sound-scape is coping with trying to be as energized and extravagant as possible, whilst the grandiose landscape stand in front of everyone willing to besiege them. Everything from the essential trumpet, down to the miniscule drumbeat is wonderful in all its glory. Frequently pounding you into accepting their volatile mixture of electronic body music, cold wave, industrial and minimal synth. Of course, nothing is complete without a little post-punk thrown in here and there. Even though the track might not be as good as the first one, its hard to actually be any better than that one. They try, but it is clear why this song isn’t the first one. But, its a successful mix, that is attractive for those of you with nostalgia embedded into your body. It’s also a renewable source of energy, which clearly states that this mixture between genres can be a success.

Invisible Guy recommends: 80s Minimal Wave! (Part II)

 

This list is by no means my all time favorite minimal wave gems, but more a blend of both obscure and more well-known artists and groups from this dimension. The numbers mean nothing. Hopefully it will be ten great tips that people can be inspired by and find music they’ve never heard, but also help them get into the genre that is minimal wave. Not everything in the list may qualify as one hundred percent trve minimal wave, but I try to keep it as close to it as possible.

You’re now entering Part II of the recommendation.

If you wish to continue, click on the Continue reading button.

Continue reading