[13th] December: Acapulco City Hunters – Chaser

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Acapulco. A Mexican municipality but mainly a city, with as many as 234 communities—the most populous being Acapulco itself—with 673 479 inhabitants as of 2010, 85,25% of the people reside in the city. When counting the most populous cities except the main one, which are: Xaltianguis, Kilómetro 30, Tres Palos, San Pedro las Playas, Amatillo—the population combined account for 3,25% of the whole municipality, making it 25857 inhabitants in total, one starts to wonder where the rest of the 11,5% have gone. Where are the other cities? Are there smaller towns, considering there are so many communities? Questions remained unanswered. Here are when Acapulco City Hunters come in – it seems like they’re looking for an answer to that question. Maybe they’re straying away, in metaphors and synonyms, but they’re probably concerned.

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Or maybe, just maybe – we’ve been tricked by these con-artists. Making us think of Mexico as the main inspiration for their name, specifically related to the aforementioned questions, but it can also mean “Goin’ to Acapulco“—a track from “Dylan Basement Tapes” (1976), and I paraphrase from an outtake from Sid Griffin’s book “Million Dollar Bash” – from the source Shelton, Robert (1986)—music-journalist Clinton Heylin commented on its sexual innuendo: …featuring the usual debauched narrator, rambunctious harmonies, and euphemistic ribaldry according to Wikipedia. We can see how both sexual innuendos are fitted in a musical environment, influenced or not by either Sid Griffin’s book, Basement Tapes, or Mexico’s ‘lost’ cities and/or communities. A lot of the topics seem to suggest a strong influence of either everything – or simply one of the things listed above.

It’s interesting to note how Acapulco City Hunters is in plural, though other things like ‘his’ patchwork blog “Cosmic Beam“—suggests otherwise. Maybe since the Facebook-page is categorized as a “Community“, rather than an Artist-page, could reveal certain other possible theories. Pluralis it is because it suits the influences for ‘his’ project. If you get the reference we’re trying to make here, you’ve got a good sense of detail. The music-making dates back two years, from when he released “Haunted Bombai“—later to have a remix of the song by “DYSWIL“—filmed by Thomas Skrobek. Apparently a collective (now defunct?) named: “Negative Beat“. One of the actors’ names (Juliette Mellard) suggest that it really is a project born and based in France—collecting individual influences elsewhere.

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He’s also done a good rendition of; Marianne Faithfull‘s “Broken English“, originally released on LP in the UK 1979, via Island Records—now a sub-division to Universal Music Group. Though we’re not enthusiasts of Marianne’s intonation – we respect and understand such an immense contribution to England’s—and the world’s—music-life that she, and her discography have revealed throughout the years. With added minimalist synthesizers and a stripped-down not as extravagant atmosphere, Acapulco City Hunters make me like “Broken English“, and take the song for what it is – albeit in a completely new way. We must say that nothing beats an original, not even an original you’re not so delighted to hear in the first place, but they do a perfectly okay effort. We’re sorry to say that the bleep-synthesizer sound is too loud, which takes away part of the experience of listening.

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Now I won’t go any further into his discography, more than note that I have written about the split he did with Luminance, titled “The Cold Rush“. Sure, most of it sounds alike when listening through once in a while, but there are certain characteristics that Acapulco City Hunters had developed—that I heard when I had listened to it for a while. We prefer when he doesn’t overcharge on his ethnic vibes. When he keeps it nice and tidy, melodically ambitious and switches between different modes of electronica – is when he’s at his peak. This was exactly what he did with that release. Ironically enough he sings about evolution in “Magdalena” and evolved he has—at least musically. Recently, he also was featured in a track he did together with Luminance—on the “The Broken Window Theory“—a newly released compilation on Wool-E Records.

For Ljudkalendern he gives us, on the 13th December, unfortunately with a delayed article, a song titled “Chaser” – which might actually be the musical hunt for Acapulco. It seems to be something defining him, at the same time cranking up the tempo to maximum—making way for a spastic and erratic synthesizer-driven track. It’s a newly produced song for the purpose of this non-commercial collection – not compilation. We hope that you’ll take a bit of his musical concept with you in your thoughts after you’ve heard it—as delicate as it is forceful.

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Listen: Venin Carmin – Glam is gone

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We must admit that we’ve gone and gotten ourselves stuck with a ‘guilty pleasure‘. Venin Carmin from the electronica duo Kelly und Kelly, have moved on to a solo-project. She calls it ‘dead pop‘ but we’re not sure what she means by labeling it that. Her sound is in between the peppiness of popular electroclash artists and groups, with an emphasis on pop. The album “Glam is gone” is her debut-effort that is ten tracks long and spans over thirty minutes in length all together. We’re not sure if the glam has gone away but we’re pretty sure that elegant glam, glitter have gone and died somewhere, in the depths of the club’s catacomb. Though questions arise when it comes to descriptions—we’re intrigued by the sound if we could strip away the inane lyrics—but also the singing style. The whole internationally-styled delivery, often courtesy of Ed Banger Record’s entrance into French electronic music, have always been unbearable to listen to—as proven by Uffie‘s debut in the limelight with: “Pop The Glock“.

She does it way better when her chansons turn into semi-ballads with an emotional message, rather than the mindless and vain attempts to create a hybrid of melodic synth and generic post-punk. So when about half of the album have been listened through, songs like “Fade & Forget” enhance our understanding of her music. When she has the capability to create such an emotional barrage that is catchy but not too deep into pop-oriented templates, it’s intolerable to start everything over again and endure the first songs. After that song everything seems to have started over again and then—”The Spiral Dance” starts—changing everything again, to a melancholic ballad with its main focus on percussion—with lovely, but static synthesizer-pads that create a whole new atmosphere. The last song is the title-track “Glam is gone” which surprise us as she focuses more on a cold-wave singing style, a concrete and stern voice resounding. Matched with an equally as restricted atmosphere that is well-produced, but intriguing. Listen to “Glam is gone” down below and make up your own mind.

Premiere: VARSOVIE – Détruire Carthage

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Propaganda straight from Warsaw, with their telecommunications-station based out of France. Building on a concept that draws influences from concrete post-punk and stable new-wave, among other genres. The reason why they’re in any way related to Warsaw is because their band-name is VARSOVIE—the french word for “Warsaw“—capital of Poland. A debut-EP came out in 2006 titled “Neuf Milimètres” (Nine Millimeters), recorded in Grenoble 13eme Etage Studio and Chaosmic Studios. Here’s also where their aesthetic concept got set in motion by the photographer Lucas Rimbaud, which portrayed a woman lying on her back with her feet in the air—maybe relating to the title of the record—Nine millimeters bullet-type, and a gun. Their sound was virtually the same as it is now but a bit more unpolished and maybe also darker. It was also a whole other set-up when it comes to the band’s compound, different members and now there’s a whole other prerequisite for the band.

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They managed to self-release this EP which came out as a CD. Two years passed and there weren’t any new album or proper release during that time—not until September of 2008. A promo-CDr titled “Etat Civil” was released featuring an album with eleven tracks, featuring Nicolas St Morand (Hreidmarr) on backing vocals for “Etat D’Urgence” (State Of Emergency), outro music by the famous late composer Franz Schubert, for the closing song “Inertie” (Inertia). Everything was recorded at Drudenhaus Studio, located in Issé, France, the home of studio engineer Benoît Roux (Anorexia Nervosa). Now the aesthetics have suddenly changed, there’s a woman standing on train-tracks holding two bags—it almost feels like she’s moving away from somewhere, to anywhere. They used a different photographer, Manon Weiser, who’s also helped with his skills for the Velvet Condom box-set “Vanity And Revolt“. A year later a proper release of the same album came out, in December of 2009.

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Six years later their latest album “L’Heure Et La Trajectoire“, was also self-released by the band. Then something happened. A Black-Metal(!) label from France called Those Opposed Records began releasing both “Etat Civil” and their newest album “L’Heure Et La Trajectoire“, in limited editions on black vinyl and colored vinyl. It’s interesting how such a label would ever take interest in VARSOVIE, whilst mainly focusing within black metal. Good for the band. So here we are, they’ve just announced the release of their latest album and everything’s dandy. Well, everything actually is pretty dandy. Repartiseraren have gotten the opportunity to premiere “Détruire Carthage” (Destroy Carthage), a track we’re particularly fond of from the new album. It’s got a rather short running time of around roughly three minutes, but all the ingredients of this fierce post-punk band—all of the energy, the ambitious and dark conditions for a nicely crafted post-punk sound—for you as a listener to stream from here. Enjoy it as much as you can!

Exclusive Premiere: Ausramp – Third Dimension Diploma

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Bringing back the oldstyle seems to be in fashion nowadays. Everything from retrofuturism to old formats like VHS – are embedded into an artists embroidery. Not to mention how the decadence of the 1980’s seems to have hit a peak, there’s also people whom are playing around with techno. You probably know the sound of the 808’s, the old-school vibes that were originally gathered from Detroit, Michigan. When that was the place to be – it still can be. There’s a man whose work you might recognize when you hear ‘Members Of The House’, the more obscure ‘Unit 2’ – or simply his full name Nicholas Bernard Marks — shortened to “Niko Marks”. He’s teamed up with Robert Des Iles, a rather passionate southern European man whose slick grooves are enhanced by the presence of Mr. Niko. Well, it’s not really that mysterious, but I would like to keep it a secret. Robert Des Iles is really a pseudonym but I will not reveal who he might be.

The thing is, Niko and Robert are now a duo called Ausramp. Yes, it sounds fascinatingly German but at the same time they keep the Americana in it by including “ramp“. Precisely the name a techno-project that goes back to its roots and includes a swing of electrofunk, should have. Their debut-release which features three songs is due to be released in two weeks and I’ve gotten my hands on one of the songs from this release. It’s a self-titled release and the track is called “Third Dimension Diploma“. They bring out the best when they return to the oldstyle of techno, adding certain aspects that might not traditionally have been it. But there’s a lot of legs swinging to the left and the right when listening to it, the rhythm is simple but the groove is out of hand. When the melodies strike in, there’s not much to do but to dance to the beat – classic stylee. No, I’m not that clichéd so you’ll have to choose what to do, but I promise that it’s a catchy track. Stream it exclusively on Repartiseraren, down below. It will be released on Kraftjerkz as their eighteenth release, in two weeks.

World Premiere: Mlada Fronta – Strict Dress Code

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Originally a group, now a solo-project. The French electronica-group Mlada Fronta, originating from Cannes, have had a rich history which has left a huge impact on techno, electro, EBM and industrial foremost, but also on ambient and IDM. Before entering the well-deserved limelight, the group released “My Visions“, “Illusory Time” and “Tribal Apocalyptic Dance” – one debut-album, three albums – spanning from darkwave, to industrial and electronic body music. Suggesstive undertones, hypnotizing atmospheres that make way for you to enter a bizarre tunnel of sound which have swept over you before you even know it. Undeservedly underlooked albums that might’ve been the collective form that molded their critically acclaimed breakthrough “High Tension” – an album that was as varied in terms of genres – as was the sound. No room for any clichés, only a space reserved for a palette of different but equally intriguing tracks, strengthened by the crossover itself – not swallowed whole. The track “XB-33” went on to be a banger in the clubs and could be heard everywhere – in 1999. We’ve taken a liking to the title-track itself because of the harsh sound, but “XB-33” surely packs a rhythm that will even make you flail your arms around as if you didn’t have a pair.

Taking the step from Tribal Productions, which almost exclusively released Mlada Fronta’s albums – the German label Flatline Records cut their piece of the cake with “High Tension” – first album to be released by a label other than their own, or at least their first deservable spot on a whole other roster. When the 1990’s were over, it seems like Rémy Pelleschi of the group took his own route with the moniker and released “Fe₂O₃” on the French label M-Tronic. With the earlier albums they had been a collective, a group of people working closely with Rémy on earlier albums before the 2000’s, including: Gilles Saïssi (My Visions, Illusory Time, High Tension), Jan-Louy (My Visions) and Philippe Croq (My Visions). With the album on M-Tronic, Rémy took to a more experimental side, mainly laying his focus on rhythmic noise as an overlaying sheet – taking to account all other genres he’d visited and re-visited during his earlier albums.

In 2002 an album titled “Oxydes” surfaced on Rémy Pelleschi’s own imprint Parametric. It included both the original album and remixes by a number of artists such as: Gom, Tarmvred, Milligramme, Dither, Mimetic and Data Raper. He even went so far as to remix one of his own songs. There was also a limited edition release of “Oxydes + Remixes” which included live performances from 2001 in Liege, Bordeaux, Lyon and Cannes. In 2005 a DVD was created and made under the name of “Dioxydes”, featuring unreleased material in an exclusive metal box, including twelve postcards, stickers, bonus material, photos, a live video from Maschinenfest in 2004, Le Cycle Du Soleil – and a radio-documentary called “The Shaker”. During these years, from 2001-2005, Rémy gained even more fame through bigger magazines picking up on his creative outburst which flourished during this time – as it did before, but with another goal and another sound in mind – so versitale as an artist and uncompromising.

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Let’s not write a whole biography here. There’s other labels who picked up on what he was doing, including Sounds Of Industry who released compilations of unreleased material, like “Contrast 2005-2011 Unreleased And Rare Tracks” and “Contrast 1998-2004 “Unreleased And Rare Tracks“, together with digital releases of “Dioxydes“, and “Le Cycle Du Soleil” – two different versions, one as an album and the other as an EP. The torch was then passed on to Artoffact Records, whom did an ambitious project collecting copious amounts of tracks which carried virtually (almost) every release that Mlada Fronta had put out – re-mastered and re-packaged into a 10xCD Box Set, in 2013. Now they have gotten the honor that it actually is to put out his comeback, an insane album that showcases the talents he still has and reminds a lot about “High Tension” – but actually carries the executed electronic body music and industrial sound – into another dimension including IDM and Techno among the main perpetrators.

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Repartiseraren is a really tiny blog-zine. We could not in our own imagination even fathom that we’d have anything to do with Rémy Pelleschi and Mlada Fronta – ever. But since Artoffact Records will release his forthcoming album (and return) “Polygon” now on the 4th of November, we’ve gotten the rare opportunity to exclusively premiere a track from this album. It is a rather anthemic and harsh electronic body-influenced track with techno smashed into it, titled “Strict Dress Code“. We’re the first to be showcasing his material now when he’s returned. This is a world premiere only available from Repartiseraren for you to stream exclusively. We’re proud and thankful for this opportunity. Please do it justice and listen to it loudly, then go over and order what ever version of “Polygon” you want at Storming the Base. When you think about ordering it, “Night Run” will be the “companion” vinyl-release to this forthcoming one.

World Premiere: Cape Noire – Avalanche

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With monumental influences taken from black metal aesthetics, it’s weird to realize how trip-hop can be thrown in to make it something completely different. Hailing from Paris, this collective of nocturnal souls make up Cape Noire – an outfit that flourishes in the catacombs. With their catchy trip-hop sound and their atmosphere lent from darkwave and other electronic genres, they fuse soulful vocals with different aesthetics. You could honestly say that “Fire” – their only publicly available track – have a musical ground available in more commercial music. Although that song is more of an anthemic introductory to this collective, it’s nice to see how you actually can stray away into darker melodies, ambitious vocals and still keep some kind of artistry connected to more widely attractive genres. But it’s good that all clichés are swept under the rug and that they develop their own sound, because that’s ultimately what gives the listener a more steadfast connection to their music.

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Repartiseraren have gotten the honor to premiere another piece of music from the strictly limited CD-release put out by Cape Noire on the 11th of October. This item will probably be a collectible, so you’d better hurry and buy one because they’re limited to thirty copies, handmade all matte black and silver ink buffered package. Their aesthetics revolve a lot around the mystery of who might be the actors behind the moniker of Cape Noire – in turn fueling the relevance of their music – besides it being masterfully crafted for your listening pleasure. Now you get to listen to another track from that release, namely: “Avalanche“, which gives you an insight into how versitale they seem to be. You can sense some dark cabaret influences that move their way through a more carefully laden atmosphere, but with utmost sincerity the trip-hop beats are laden in perfect conjunction to the marvelous vocals. Listen to the track down below. Buy the CD from them here.