Reviews: Multiple Man – New Metal, V/A – Strategies Against The Body Vol. 2

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Here comes a double track-by-track review of the newest releases, courtesy of DKA Records, based out of Atlanta, Georgia. Their discography includes: Boy Harsher, Dylan Ettinger / Goldendust, Profligate, Fit Of Body, Warning Light, Voice Of Saturn / Anticipation, High-Functioning Flesh, Valis, TWINS and Women’s Work.

As of the 2nd of March they’ve added two new releases to this immense discography – the debut full-length LP-release by Brisbane’s twin-brother-duo Sean and Chris Campion, otherwise known as Multiple Man, the release goes by the name of “New Metal“. Strategies Against The Bodies have now been introduced as a second volume, featuring even more artists then the first compilation. In this article I dissect each song of both releases and tell you my opinion on them. The release was mixed by Matt Weiner (CGI Records) and mastered by Dietrich Schoenemann.

Starting off with “New Metal“, having listened through their other discography, including favorites of mine from Detonic Records – the “Guilt Culture/Boiling Down” double-single – it is fair to say that when introducing this new full-length they’ve grown a bit in my eyes considering the sound itself and the general aesthetics which are pleasing for the eyes as the cover itself (created by James Stuart) reminds one about earlier industrial-releases in terms of appearance. You get a sinister and chaotic feeling in terms of the colors when they mix together, outlining the appearance of a seemingly distraught and/or desperate man. The font is also alluring and you basically get it right if you think the release has anything to do with body music or industrial music.

As the first song “Slow Code” is rung in by the scraping of metal, a violently underlying basedrum is introduced and on top of that a steady rocking beat – which together with other percussive elements mixed together – suddenly jumpstarts an electronic body music rhythm. It’s a pleasing synthesizer which develops into a harsher, more industrial-like anthemic kind of song, as outdrawn baselines and the overlying synthesizers make the rhythm multi-faceted – together with murmured vocals that add to the sinister feeling you get whilst listening to it. It is a somewhat catchy song that draws in a self-assuring vibe in terms of how bombastic everything gets after a while.

Even though it is repetetive in some parts, the soundscape itself morphs into something completely different the longer in it progresses. The chorus brings everything together into the theme of the whole song and what it is supposed to be and convey. It is a cold endeavour but at the same time it is not stripped of any emotions, as there is a whole palette of different feelings that you feel when listening to it. I feel alert, concentrated and inspired, on the edge tuning in.

If the first song was portrayed as anthemic, wait until you hear “Power Fantasy” – which starts with an off-putting “yoo-hoo“, to be smashed into your consciousness by one of the most perfect rhythms I’ve heard in this wave of new-body music. Everything about this song relies on the first synthesizer-rhythm and the percussive elements that are introduced. To add to the general heftiness of the song itself, the vocals together with additional basedrums create an enjoyable repetetive atmosphere which later on looms into a more atmospheric concentration of industrialized sound.

The sudden shrieking of the vocalist reapplies the stripped soundscape and reuses it to their heart’s content. Even after only having listened to the first two songs, one must say that this one – “Power Fantasy” – is something really special. Whether it is the retro industrial feeling that weighs in when all the beats collide, or if it is their special brand of it, is hard to say. But damn it is a really catchy song and even though the lyrical content might be unintelligible at times – the simpleness of it adds into the harsh emotional deliverance – which they manage to do perfectly. It is a jaw-droppingly good song, once you’ve listened through it way too many times.

Now with the next and third song on this release, it is less concentrated to harsh rhythms and electronic body music and more pure electronica with minimal synth weaved into it – I am, of course, talking about “Luxury Boys“. There’s a certain primitive vibe to the song even though the synthesizers, baselines and beats together concoct a swaying and interesting blend of these different forms of electronica. It feels dated, like something out of a time-machine, yet remarkably attached to the modern world as such. However, it would fit great in an alternative movie from the 1980’s.

At times the atmosphere feels like something exotic, especially when you hear the percussion and the main synthesizer which steadfastly creates a memorable thematic, which you end up portraying in your head. It is audio-visually a really great song, however I’m more impressed by the harsher side of Multiple Man. Though they’ve managed to, in their song, convey a more laidback alter ego – musically.

Skin” – their fourth song – has that same kind of feeling attached to it like the previous song. It seems like they’ve changed the general theme of their songs, as it progresses from the first and second, to the third and the fourth. It develops lyrically as well and becomes some kind of acid electronic bastard child of industrial music. When the synthesizer revs up to show its true acid colors – one is intrigued by it since it adds a whole different characteristic to the song itself – alongside the vocals that are unenthusiastically chanted and feel like they’re just being dragged along for the ride.

It is probably one of the songs up until now that have the best vocals in them. It adds so much more to the experience of listening to the song as well as the development of the soundscape as it accompanies the different influences and rhythms perfectly together. Though it might be added that the song in itself is impressive in many ways, it fails to attract any further emotions when listening to it, as it is only brought out when everything is brought together in an almost cataclysmic fashion.

Returning to the pure electronic body music with the fifth song “Negative Space” – an ominously sounding piece. A continously pounding rhythm attached to a gloomy atmosphere, feeling more like an intermission then anything else. One can’t help but feel left to the metaphorical clock ticking in the form of outdrawn synth-stabs. Somehow the electronic body music elements are of not the same importance as the more atmospheric aspects of this song. The continuity is what defines it all. It just keeps going.

Maybe this might be the dividing line that will shift the musical focus to something else or it may just be a filler for the filler’s sake. Usually, artists and bands have one of these kinds of tracks in their repertoir, in the case of Multiple Man – this song stands out from their others and in a positive manner as well. Reminding oneself about the shifting character of their sound and what they might be able to accomplish, and want to accomplish with their music.

Hotter Then Hell” is the sixth song on this neverending ride of different, excitingly fresh electronic body music with industrial vibes. This song is probably the most sublime of the bunch so far, it has got a really ambiguous vibe to it. One negative thing about it is that it is also the most boring song in terms of the soundscape, as there’s not much happening and it is not as upbeat as the other tracks. Nothing wrong with a downbeat track but this one doesn’t really cut it for me.

Ideal Self” is where it is at. It’s been tried with the other songs but it has got a funkier vibe then the other ones. The atmosphere is really wicked and the rhythm goes up and down like a jojo, embracing the more danceable elements and turning it around for them now later on in this release. It is really all about combining the more unusual genres and turning it into the new face of the Multiple Man that makes it or breaks it in terms of this song. Groovy is what characterize this musical experience the best.

Interestingly enough, as the song fades out and turns into “New Metal” – they’ve decided to put this title-track last on the record. Really a perfect summarization of what they have achieved during this eight-track long release. Even though it lacks everything that made the first few songs great it combines everything one’s heard so far into a mixture of the weirdness and the high energy electronic body music into an acid and industrial rollercoaster which holds up in the end.

I say that only because the rhythms are on point and this song is basically what you should’ve listened to first if you wanted a summary. My thoughts about this full-length debut-LP on DKA Records is that it brings something odd to the table and spins things around completely out of your own safe-zone. You must have taken a liking for electronic body music transgressing into all kinds of different music genres, plus the experimental edge in which Multiple Man hold their territory firm. Although some of the songs are a disappointment, not all of them need to be as good as “Power Fantasy” to hold up in the end. The more you listen to it, the more you enjoy the self-willed nature of this duo.

Tomorrow this article will be updated with a track-by-track review of Strategies Against The Body Volume 2. You can stream Multiple Man’s release “New Metal” down below and make up your own mind about it, but from what I’ve heard throughout the songs – they’ve surely got potential that enrich the DKA Records discography further.

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A follow-up to the 2015 compilation “Strategies Against The Body – Volume 1” have been released via DKA Records. Featuring a whole different roster of artists, containing various electronic genres, all derived from the so-called underground. Some of them more established then others. The cover for the release is very aesthetically unpleasant to lay one’s eyes on but is a reflection of what you can anticipate when listening through this compilation of artists.

Pyramid Club is the first artist and one must say that they’ve got a whole lot better songs then this one. It’s a freakishly monotonous song that doesn’t really cut it. One doesn’t really feel anything when listening to their song “It’s All Grey” – the atmosphere that is there is off-putting and doesn’t do them justice in terms of their discography, otherwise. What saves this song is the latter part of it beyond three minutes in, when the vocals go into a howling frenzy and the basedrum lunge at you as if it had gone berserk.

I really want to like this song but can’t really fathom it. Melodically it is odious and it doesn’t even give the tag ‘experimental‘ body music any revitalization. Repetetiveness and experimentalism can give you a whole other insight into what electronic music ultimately could be about – but here they just fall flat with their brand of it. Very unfortunate for anyone who’s fond of Pyramid Club’s current discography of demo-tracks with lots of potential.

Now on to Passing, who’s song “Sacrifice” starts off rather intriguingly with that bass-filled melodious atmosphere which bounce around in infinity together with acid influences as rambunctious electronica pushed to its limits. Then, suddenly, the vocals are introduced into the mix and one is instantly taken out of the mesmerizing sound – because they lack the punch and the guts which the rest of the soundscape perfectly molds into – overtime. It adds absolutely nothing that progresses the atmosphere even remotely. It would even be better if it was wholly instrumental instead, unfortunately.

All-in-all, the song itself has one hooked to the beats, rhythm and melodious extravagance. There’s a sense of emergency in the overall expression it gives, the fast-paced lunging, acidic body music with electronic overtones – masterfully executed, instrumentally at least. It’s got the perfect length as well and you can never get enough of the simple melodies that together make something out of nothing, adding complexity together with the percussion.

What never tires me is the special kind of desperate brand of electronic body music that Celldöd creates. He can make something out of nothing, it sounds huge no matter what he attaches himself to and the atmospheric feel of “Hemliga Rum” is made alarmingly brutal with his vocals alone. A hiss here and a hiss there, a steady acid rhythm with a baseline that seems to get harder the further into the song you get – the echoes of the vocals, making one uneasy listening to the song – all that is there, in the vast nothingness that he portrays – follow him into the secret room.

Imagining that it would be some kind of abandoned house or industrial setting, together with the lyrics in Swedish repeatedly saying “Take me with you, I want to see what you see, into secret rooms“, as if he is desperately clinging on to something – the deliverance is absolutely on point and adds much as the snaredrum hit is industrially enhanced by sounding like he’s hitting on a metal object – which in reality, maybe he is. It adds that extra portion of the atmosphere which would otherwise be lacking. In the end a very good song which leaves nothing to imagine, audiovisually he puts images in ones head.

Continuing in basically the same manner as the other songs, a kind of acid-inspired baseline together with melodic noises, Spatial Relation‘s song “Infinitely Wary” is now playing. I don’t really know what to say about Lissette Schoenly’s vocals – but it fits very well into the atmosphere created by the synthesizers and percussive elements – though it really does nothing for me while listening to it. I feel no emotions, it just feels like one has to get through it to get on with listening to the rest of the compilation. This brand of electronica hasn’t really gotten me interested, which is a shame, since they repeat what Pyramid Club did with their introductory song to this whole compilation.

When one has listened through the song a few more times, one finds it to be somewhat alluring – though it can’t be explained, really. There’s something avant-garde about the approach to the whole song and how they utilize the different elements of it, how it gradually progresses and how it finishes. There’s a little redemption in the form of the atmosphere as it grabs onto you in a weird way, the electro-vibe and all, which is odd to say the least but hey.

One of my favorite projects since “The Red Dress – Parts I/II“, James Andrew’s own Tifaret, is featured on this compilation as the fifth track in a total of ten. The song “Lara” interesingly enough sounds like “Keep On Driving” (one of his other songs) – the difference is if Andrew Eldritch had a son, James Andrew would be his. Their vocals are really alike and one feels like he’s drawn a little bit too much inspiration in his song-making from The Sisters Of Mercy’s front-man. It is, however, not pastiche – the atmosphere is nice and the beats are on point.

Melodically it must’ve drawn influence from his earlier song but it doesn’t really matter. This is one of the better songs I’ve heard on this compilation up until now. Hopefully this is the one that turns it around and introduces one to some equally as great songs. It should be released simultaneously as this song, as it feels like a variant and lies really close in the whole soundscape and if it weren’t for the different melodies, more emotional vocals, it would almost be identical.

Suddenly, awestricken, in a good way. Anticipation flies into your ears with that subliminal, brooding electronic body music that has a groove like no other – talking of course about the song “Photograph” – which together with samples and a rhythm out of this world is gradually making one reconsider what one’s written about the compilation in general. Now we’re talking about some serious electronic music, whose atmosphere makes one dance along to it and is catchy as no other song – currently on this compilation.

One does not mind the repetetiveness of the beats as it slowly develops over time, introducing small but noticeable changes in character which enhances the whole experience of listening to it. The continually pounding sub-baseline pushes the beats further into the forefront of the mix – and there’s never a dull moment listening to this song. Thankfully, maybe there’s still hope for the compilation in large as we proceed.

SinceGhoul” was released in 2016, Videograve have been out of the loop. Now they’re back, on this compilation. The melodies in their song “Dead Men Floating” are equally as sinister as the title of it. They’ve let the melodies be at the forefront of the atmosphere and the beats plus percussion in the back, giving off a resounding and reverberated no-nonsense sound. Videograve are one of the more interesting acts that have emerged the last few years when it comes to electronic music. They have an authentic and goddamn awesome sound. Electronic body music gone haywire, electronic body music developed from a general minimal electronics waypath – never straying away from originality.

This is my favorite song so far on this compilation. I’m very impressed in general. There’s nothing to complain about, it is a really enjoyable song to listen to and there are so many facets of it that you’ve stopped counting. They really portray a sinister picture – a rather picturesque one if one may say so – audio-visually aesthetically pleasing, if that makes any sense at all.

Now for something a lot different. Collin Gorman Weiland’s song “Indenture and Stone” – monotonous industrial techno, with minimal wave influences. A very bleak song in terms of the atmosphere, very heavy when it comes to the industrial side of it and something that brings forth a whole different sound on this compilation. It is noticeable that the end is near whilst listening to it, the very apathetic vocals and the grinding percussion that seem to have no end to it. Draining energy from every outlet where there’s even sound.

There’s an anti-upbeatness to the song, it is downtempo but tries hard to be upbeat. Looming on as if nothing ever mattered, ending rather beautifully and very unexpectedly – turning into an ambient piece that gives one inner peace while listening to it. A welcoming addition to an otherwise interesting and never-ending seance. Had the latter parts of the song been developed even further, there might’ve been a nice blend of ambient industrial and the harshness of the song itself.

Ninth song on the compilation is by ARIISK and is titled “Candid Machine” – which is one of those songs that never develop into anything. It would’ve been better if it had some progression worth to mention. All this experimental electronic body music is making one’s head spin. There’s nothing about the monotonous approach in rhythm that gives anything, it just feels like a piece that is stuck in the same rhythm and melody without ever ending or transforming into anything good.

There’s a continuous lack in the atmosphere itself that isn’t repaired by the beats nor the progression of the song itself. Not to mention the vocals – it doesn’t add or bring anything out of the atmosphere. Even though this song might be meant to sound dark and provoke some kind of emotion, there isn’t any. It feels like one wants to skip the song and head onto the last one, there’s few moments that attract any noteable attention.

Xander Harris delivers the final song on this compilation, titled “Social Leather“. When pushing play on this song, there’s a wondrous tone coming from the melody. It feels like you’re high above the clouds, or that you’re way out of your body and somewhere else. It has a dreamy touch to it and the vocals expand on that subject. There’s an electro-vibe to it vocally and the atmosphere is absolutely phenomenal. There’s a transgression between different electronic genres that he executes flawlessly.

Being the final song on this release, it makes up for other moments experienced while listening to the compilation. One must say, to DKA Record’s credit, that it is a compilation that has some kind of sense of purpose when it comes to the assortment of different artists – too bad that it doesn’t go the whole way in terms of how good that, in theory, should be. I must recommend it any way, because there are certain moments on this release that are enticing. Stream the full release down below on Soundcloud.

[13th] December: Acapulco City Hunters – Chaser

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Acapulco. A Mexican municipality but mainly a city, with as many as 234 communities—the most populous being Acapulco itself—with 673 479 inhabitants as of 2010, 85,25% of the people reside in the city. When counting the most populous cities except the main one, which are: Xaltianguis, Kilómetro 30, Tres Palos, San Pedro las Playas, Amatillo—the population combined account for 3,25% of the whole municipality, making it 25857 inhabitants in total, one starts to wonder where the rest of the 11,5% have gone. Where are the other cities? Are there smaller towns, considering there are so many communities? Questions remained unanswered. Here are when Acapulco City Hunters come in – it seems like they’re looking for an answer to that question. Maybe they’re straying away, in metaphors and synonyms, but they’re probably concerned.

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Or maybe, just maybe – we’ve been tricked by these con-artists. Making us think of Mexico as the main inspiration for their name, specifically related to the aforementioned questions, but it can also mean “Goin’ to Acapulco“—a track from “Dylan Basement Tapes” (1976), and I paraphrase from an outtake from Sid Griffin’s book “Million Dollar Bash” – from the source Shelton, Robert (1986)—music-journalist Clinton Heylin commented on its sexual innuendo: …featuring the usual debauched narrator, rambunctious harmonies, and euphemistic ribaldry according to Wikipedia. We can see how both sexual innuendos are fitted in a musical environment, influenced or not by either Sid Griffin’s book, Basement Tapes, or Mexico’s ‘lost’ cities and/or communities. A lot of the topics seem to suggest a strong influence of either everything – or simply one of the things listed above.

It’s interesting to note how Acapulco City Hunters is in plural, though other things like ‘his’ patchwork blog “Cosmic Beam“—suggests otherwise. Maybe since the Facebook-page is categorized as a “Community“, rather than an Artist-page, could reveal certain other possible theories. Pluralis it is because it suits the influences for ‘his’ project. If you get the reference we’re trying to make here, you’ve got a good sense of detail. The music-making dates back two years, from when he released “Haunted Bombai“—later to have a remix of the song by “DYSWIL“—filmed by Thomas Skrobek. Apparently a collective (now defunct?) named: “Negative Beat“. One of the actors’ names (Juliette Mellard) suggest that it really is a project born and based in France—collecting individual influences elsewhere.

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He’s also done a good rendition of; Marianne Faithfull‘s “Broken English“, originally released on LP in the UK 1979, via Island Records—now a sub-division to Universal Music Group. Though we’re not enthusiasts of Marianne’s intonation – we respect and understand such an immense contribution to England’s—and the world’s—music-life that she, and her discography have revealed throughout the years. With added minimalist synthesizers and a stripped-down not as extravagant atmosphere, Acapulco City Hunters make me like “Broken English“, and take the song for what it is – albeit in a completely new way. We must say that nothing beats an original, not even an original you’re not so delighted to hear in the first place, but they do a perfectly okay effort. We’re sorry to say that the bleep-synthesizer sound is too loud, which takes away part of the experience of listening.

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Now I won’t go any further into his discography, more than note that I have written about the split he did with Luminance, titled “The Cold Rush“. Sure, most of it sounds alike when listening through once in a while, but there are certain characteristics that Acapulco City Hunters had developed—that I heard when I had listened to it for a while. We prefer when he doesn’t overcharge on his ethnic vibes. When he keeps it nice and tidy, melodically ambitious and switches between different modes of electronica – is when he’s at his peak. This was exactly what he did with that release. Ironically enough he sings about evolution in “Magdalena” and evolved he has—at least musically. Recently, he also was featured in a track he did together with Luminance—on the “The Broken Window Theory“—a newly released compilation on Wool-E Records.

For Ljudkalendern he gives us, on the 13th December, unfortunately with a delayed article, a song titled “Chaser” – which might actually be the musical hunt for Acapulco. It seems to be something defining him, at the same time cranking up the tempo to maximum—making way for a spastic and erratic synthesizer-driven track. It’s a newly produced song for the purpose of this non-commercial collection – not compilation. We hope that you’ll take a bit of his musical concept with you in your thoughts after you’ve heard it—as delicate as it is forceful.

[8th] December: Red Mecca – Sunny Day

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A decade turned into another, quickly the 1980’s faded into oblivion and the 1990s was born—Cabaret Voltaire had their release “Red Mecca” put out on CD via Restless Records and Mute Records. Nine years earlier that album was released on Rough Trade Records, being a their fourth album if you ignore the “Live At The Y.M.C.A. 27.10.79” and “Live At The Lyceum” releases. Fast-forward eight years from 1990 and you get 1998—the same year Jan Strandqvist release a maxi-single under the name Red Mecca. Coincidence? I think not. We think there’s little doubt that Cabaret Voltaire’s name of their fourth album influenced him, when it came to choosing the name of his project. The maxi-single was called “Please Goddess” and got produced during the time Telegram Records Stockholm existed, first an independent Swedish label started in 1987, in the end of the 1990’s sold to Warner Music’s sub-division to WEA (Warner Elektra Atlantic). Now since some time back a defunct label.

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During the time-period where the label was still at least going forward, Red Mecca put out a song called “Underground” which was, at least for the Warner Music Sweden-release, written by Eric Svensson—co-founder of Sidelake Studios, gold & platinum selling producer and songwriter. When this solo-project which we suppose could be attributed to Jan Strandqvist alone, with some reservations, was in its first stages—the focus laid on House-music from what we can tell. A huge step away from what Red Mecca was to become, but we’re getting there. A maxi-CD called “Love Is A Savage Thing“, featuring the track with the same name and remixes of it, including a new version of “Underground” as a fourth track—Maria Ritzén of Stone Soul Picnic were the vocalist. The project itself seemed to be more of a project for Eric S as he is credited for remixing, but it’s hard to see where Jan comes in after this. Telegram Records closed down and went defunct. We’re in the 2000’s now, where it changed from the 21st Century to a millennium.

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The project wasn’t activated again until 2013. The same year, Frida Madeleine contributes to a Massproduktion compilation of interpretations by local creators for their latest vinyl-releases, the track is named “Frostjackan“—originally written and performed by the Swedish pop-band Indi. Somewhere along the lines they found one another and re-activated a long lost project which hadn’t been touched since 2000. Thirteen years later Frida Madeleine becomes the singer of Red Mecca—Jan Strandqvist the producer and machine-operator. The project changes completely from House to a combination of darkwave and indie-pop. The album “You Were Never Here” is released on Massproduktion as a CDr, featuring six tracks, one track called “Love & Hate“—with music by Anders Brodin, Henrik Brodin, Jan Strandqvist, Mikael Svensk and Peter Byström. Track three and four was written by Bonnie Rabson. Roughly a year later a proper album is released under the name “Covered With Rain“. The lyrics for all the songs are now written by Frida Madeleine, and she also made the music for “When It’s Empty“—the opening track. Jan Strandqvist produces the release, creates the cover together with Robert Persson, as photographed by Izabelle Englund. The label artwork was created by Catherine Fandén. Mastered at Cutting Room by Mats Lindfors. Let’s leave the technical aspects now.

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With their wondrous sound, gloomy and virtuous atmosphere, they create some kind of warmth which sucks you into the music. They’re an unbreakable duo that have just released a new b-side from their latest album, called “Endless – Highest Mountain On Mars Remix“. Now they’re featured in Ljudkalendern for the 8th December with an unreleased track they’ve had laying around. A humble but ultimately beautiful song which goes by the name of “Sunny Day“—a crash-course in complete melancholia. Here they show more of their darkwave-side and less of their pop-oriented blasphemy. Kidding, of course—everyone likes pop, including me. But I have a certain kind of passion for darkwave. Calm vocals, descending synthesizers that build up and create a fragmented atmosphere: “You can’t stop this motion“. Listen to it exclusively on Repartiseraren as a part of our non-commercial collection.

Poem:

Fade into darkness,
embrace it regardless
Brighten up for a day,
heighten your own stay

This is the passionate delivery of Red Mecca. We’re in Nirvana now and don’t look any further. There’s only an hour or two left of this day, so embrace whatever they’re intending to give you. Listen to it with open ears and let it sink in. Blend into a wondrous atmosphere. Here’s for the 8th December—”Sunny Day“—better not rain. It can wait until tomorrow when another track will be put up and out for Ljudkalendern.

Listen: Venin Carmin – Glam is gone

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We must admit that we’ve gone and gotten ourselves stuck with a ‘guilty pleasure‘. Venin Carmin from the electronica duo Kelly und Kelly, have moved on to a solo-project. She calls it ‘dead pop‘ but we’re not sure what she means by labeling it that. Her sound is in between the peppiness of popular electroclash artists and groups, with an emphasis on pop. The album “Glam is gone” is her debut-effort that is ten tracks long and spans over thirty minutes in length all together. We’re not sure if the glam has gone away but we’re pretty sure that elegant glam, glitter have gone and died somewhere, in the depths of the club’s catacomb. Though questions arise when it comes to descriptions—we’re intrigued by the sound if we could strip away the inane lyrics—but also the singing style. The whole internationally-styled delivery, often courtesy of Ed Banger Record’s entrance into French electronic music, have always been unbearable to listen to—as proven by Uffie‘s debut in the limelight with: “Pop The Glock“.

She does it way better when her chansons turn into semi-ballads with an emotional message, rather than the mindless and vain attempts to create a hybrid of melodic synth and generic post-punk. So when about half of the album have been listened through, songs like “Fade & Forget” enhance our understanding of her music. When she has the capability to create such an emotional barrage that is catchy but not too deep into pop-oriented templates, it’s intolerable to start everything over again and endure the first songs. After that song everything seems to have started over again and then—”The Spiral Dance” starts—changing everything again, to a melancholic ballad with its main focus on percussion—with lovely, but static synthesizer-pads that create a whole new atmosphere. The last song is the title-track “Glam is gone” which surprise us as she focuses more on a cold-wave singing style, a concrete and stern voice resounding. Matched with an equally as restricted atmosphere that is well-produced, but intriguing. Listen to “Glam is gone” down below and make up your own mind.

[4th] December: Crowhurst – Shallow

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From America with deep-rooted hatred and especially no love for Bono or The Beatles, comes Crowhurst—a solo-project commanded by Jay Gambit—also known under the guise of Girl 27—a continuation of his sound experiments. Before May of this year the project was a collaborative one with a full band set-up. From then he’s gone from noise, power electronics, dark ambient and back again, including numerous attempts at drone and ambient. We must admit that many of his releases remain unheard but his concepts are of interest. Not only because of his collaborative efforts on split-releases with Water Torture, Et Nihil, Sordo, Human Fluid Rot, Tanner Garza, Black Leather Jesus, Breakdancing Ronald Reagan, Trevor Bolin, et cetera — but because of his productiveness, and transgression between electronic and non-electronic music. Power electronics and power-violence seem to have more in common than one could ever imagine. It’s actually not that hard to fit those genres together, the only bump in the road would be where to draw the line, but there have been even weirder constellations co-operating so nothing should be said about that.

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One confusion is whether Crowhurst since Girl 27’s first release “And I Hope Nothing Hurts You More​.​.​.” goes back to being a whole “ensemble“, or if it is intended for his personal experimentation. I hope for the latter. Somewhere along the road if you’re not into the phenomenon, you can easily confuse both his solo-project and his supporting players for one and the same, besides the reality of the harshness that separates the two. So it’s good that he chose to go his own way under a whole new name. This makes the connections even more irrelevant and creates a distinction between his follow-up work and the original setting of Crowhurst. Anyhow, his productiveness, let’s return to that. With his harsh noise endeavor, four original releases have been put out, named: “And I Hope Nothing Hurts You More​.​.​.“, “The End“, “Haldol“. and the self-titled release “Girl 27“. He’s also been able to hook in Dreamcatcher for a split-release. Though I am not too sure about the nihilistic tendencies delivered, conceptually the releases make for vivid interpretations.

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So for the 4th of December, Crowhurst have lent himself for a more beat-oriented and noise-driven intermezzo which starts of painfully harsh, keeps going at it for what feels like more then four minutes and then completely dies out into nothingness. It might be a proper transgression from his old self to the new moniker he operates. The song is titled “Shallow” and separates the thin lines between ambient-like noise and a steady rhythm which shakes you around and spins your world 360 degrees in the wrong direction.

Poem:

You be nice to Santa,
he’ll grant you Americana
If you’re not,
he’ll be utterly distraught

4th of December has not ended yet, but only begun. We’re past the cold and chilly grounds, we’ve entered the desert and you’ve suffered heat exhaustion. Tomorrow a new track will be released and the temperature might flutter. Until then, enjoy the exclusive and newly produced song “Shallow” courtesy of Crowhurst, on Repartiseraren.

Listen: Coarse Language – Definite Hiatus

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There’s a Canadian indie-label that emerged in 2008, that have just put up a forthcoming release for digital streaming. It’s a label called Artificial Records – and their latest addition to their quick growing discography is an album called: “Definite Hiatus“, produced by Coarse Language—an artist (or group) unknown to us. A suitable description for their music would be “deranged electronica“, since the erratic beats and paranoid whispers conjure a prime setting for weirdness. One could also name it experimental minimal wave, but there are so many different influences at play so an umbrella term is hard to set for this kind of music. Not to mention how their melodies swiftly change, with dark baselines that draw out the worst sides of mankind in a musical setting. Multiple personalities, or alter-egos, which make the arrhythmic noise seem more friendly from one track to another — but be on your guard because they’re predators. Sometimes the melodies take the upper-hand but there’s always a minimalistic reminder of how shrouded, clad in spikes, dressed for destruction their environment is — thrashing melodies, relocating sound into bizarre harshness.

We’re not that interested in the psychological aspects of the sound, but rather how it is audio-visually—a thing Coarse Language seem to know how to do. They’re perfect alarmists with a subliminal message, whether it was originally intended for it to be like that, is not something to take into account. But a lot of the complexity in the sound reveal that another more obvious vein shows—a repetitive message (lyrically) which is contrasted by the sheer amount of invention—they seem to possess. If we’re wrong, they might even be playing with illusions to deceive; with their maniacally tedious passages later on in other tracks on the album. Even though it only contains six tracks, it’s a gem that you might not appreciate right away—rather when you’re able to sculpt your own interpretation of them. Listen to their release down below and buy a limited edition cassette (50 units) from Artificial Records — if you want a physical item.