Premiere: Női Kabát – Make Room! Make Room! [Musicvideo]

The people of Női Kabát have released a music-video in collaboration with ASWESAW (whom produced it), which is an experimental documentary project based out of London. It was directed by Boldizsar CR, DOP by Oskar Proctor, edited by Boldizsar CR, and assisted by Rachel Schoenfeldt. The video itself was filmed six months ago and premiered yesterday. Like the unobservant fool that I am, I evidently missed it. Knowing what their song is all about in the first place, the video makes more sense. Here comes an excerpt from the interview I did with Női Kabát, as Dee Rüsche explains what the song itself is about:

The title comes from the book ‘Make Room! Make Room!’ by Harry Harrison. This was turned into the film Soylent Green. It is generally a story of overpopulation and the decadence in decay that perhaps that would facilitate. I like to think of it as a love song also and a thought that there would still be a way out. These fragile figures ultimately burn in the fire like the human race is heading towards.

It becomes evident that the video is all about the same thing. I find it to be equally as masterful as the video for “Underpass“, by John Foxx. That particular song was influenced a lot by J.G. Ballard and takes up the topic of total urban decay, along with the sentiment of overpopulation. Detachment from humans as such and humanity as a whole. Whilst this is an interesting comparison, one must not forget some of the joyous elements that Női Kabát carry in their song – which is worlds apart from the indifferent and nostalgic nature of “Underpass“. It’s almost as if there’s something enjoyable in humanity’s own doom. But there’s also the indifference that John Foxx carries within his song. So much of it can be compared, even though they’re forty years apart. Maybe it’s because the same topic is even more relevant now then it was back then. It feels like he was a prophet of some sort. Anyway, enough of this and more of Női Kabát. You can watch their music-video up top and actually order from their new batch of “Make Room! Make Room!” 7¨’s, as [aufnahme+wiedergabe] rolls out a second edition, limited to 200 and in black vinyl. Which are available now, over here.

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Premiere: Lebanon Hanover – Hall of Ice [Musicvideo]

Lebanon Hanover are releasing a new album today, titled “Tomb For Two“. The video itself is of the track “Hall of Ice“, which is a track taken from their album which is released today. Diego Barrera of Celestial Twins Production have directed this music-video, but he’s also the art director and he’s written it. Accompanied by assistant director Julieta Triangular, featuring Camilo Acosta, Camilo Arévalo and Michel Beauvais. Last but not least, it was edited by Adria Ghiralt. The release itself can be obtained on Fabrika Records, so if you like what you’re hearing, you can buy it over here. It’s in the vein of what Lebanon Hanover have pulled off earlier, but there’s a certain melodic vibe that haven’t been around in their earlier releases. So, there’s still some hope left for us. You can sense the hopefulness between the lines of the melancholic strikes of post-punk and cold wave. Another interesting thing is the sincere output of both English and German in the same song. It makes the whole landscape even more dismayed, as if this is the communique from Lebanon Hanover to the rest of the world. I can understand the pain they experience, since the world we’re living in isn’t really the epitome of civilization. A fighting spirit against the norms created by people in society. The video itself has a representation and is meant to portray the following:

This video is presented as a confrontation, a symbolic representation of a struggle, criticizing the role of religious images (primarily christian), which serves to indoctrinate us into accepting the norms, educating us to accept corrupted society values, employing blame (pointing to each other), ideological superiority, in which “sin” is not understood like a principle of perfection {as explained by Oscar Wilde while in prison).

On the other hand, this video is also an ode to cultural universality as a principle of tolerance, an ode to the connection with femininity and eroticism, to Rebis {The Hermetic Androgyne}.

Catharsis (removal of thorns), build revolutionary mechanisms by means of opening the mind and fighting against social conditioning.

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Interview with Light House!

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Light House is a two-piece group that is hard to categorize music-wise. They stumble upon each other as their intricate music is filled to the brink with cold wave, minimal synth, industrial, dark wave and everything in between. The core members of Light House have always been Chris Relyea and Dawn Sharp, with occasional help from Brooks Blackhawk (Atriarch) and their new addition to the gang – Frank Burkard, whom you’ll know more about if you read this interview. It’s one of those groups that you simply set your eyes on and couldn’t turn away for a moment. When I started listening to their music, I was simply hooked. Since 2011, they’ve released everything from their self-released 7¨ in that year, to their “2012 / WISHBONE” 7¨ which was released in 2012. To their first EP ever, titled “In Their Image EP“, which was first released by Freee Records and later on, in 2013 – re-released by Mannequin Records. Here, in this interview, you’ll get to know a little bit more about their forthcoming album, how they evolved, what Light House means to them, their thoughts about their own music, and much more. Read this or leave it be, but I bet it won’t leave you unshaken.

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Interview with Jen Ellerson of Modern Movement!

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Modern Movement is a project that was jumpstarted by Jen Ellerson, back in 2010. She wanted to capture a movement that she’d seen rising in Berlin, which was limited to eclectic and nocturnal sub-cultures within this specific region of Germany. Mainly ranging from cold wave to other obscure sounds. Those that are involved with the project, describe themselves as “a collective of ambitious, international misfits with irreproachable taste“. So, when this concept first set out to do something, it was by putting up club-nights that would fuse together the potential she saw in Berlin. Garnering a lot of momentum from her previous (and still current) project Brave Exhibitions, which is about the same thing, but not really. It’s based out of London, but it’s focused within a similar scene. She’s been running it together with James Lowry for some time now. Anyway, since club-nights only and installations at that, didn’t really pinpoint what was happening around her, she sketched out an idea for a book in 2011. This later on formed into a bigger project, which would come out in 2013 and also include a compilation of tracks to accompany the book itself. Like a soundtrack for everything that’s been gathered around. There’s a lot to say about Jen Ellerson, and she’s got a lot of experience within multimedia as such, but hopefully this interview will clear up a lot of question-marks. I asked her about the book, the idea behind it, Brave Exhibitions, Modern Movement, what it was like coming to Berlin, how Berlin differs from London and much more. I’m hoping that you’ll find this informative and enjoyable, and I hope that some of you actually recognize yourselves as part of this story.

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Spotlight [SP. ED 2]: Light House / DUST!

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This Italian label named Mannequin Records have long been releasing newly re-issued stuff specifically from the 80’s. They’ve actually released new bands since the beginning, but I’ve always seen them as a “re-issue” label. Since I first and foremost saw them as a re-issue label, I needed to wash that stamp away with some highly intensive synth-pop, quirky minimal synth and charged industrialized cold wave. In this Special Edition of spotlight, we’re guided to the latest releases from this magnificent label. One is a debut-release and the other is a group that has been around since 2012. Newly formed, newly shaped and freshly squeezed. We present to you reviews of: Light House and DUST.

a2890133176_10Light House originates from Portland, where they’ve been around a couple of years. This group features the members Chris Relyea (ex- The Rapture), with Dawn Sharp and Brooks Blackhawk from Atriarch. Their debut-release “In Their Image“, is a four-tracked arachnoid, churning out poisonously addictive dark-wave and minimal synth. This EP of theirs is a somnambulist and ritualistic approach to these genres. Forged with utmost respectfulness to the ambiguous elements that rarely is concocted together with dark wave. Every hit of the longing synthesizer is a reminder that this world is much larger than we’d think it would be. As you slowly sink into the deep-end of the rosewater, when the darkened and spacious rhythms hit your ears like a concrete wall. Together with the pumping beat that continuously vibrates in conjunction with the rest of the beautifully laden sound-scape in front of you. Every mechanism is turning til’ the last component, as you slowly get indulged in the momentum that has been garnering since the start. Fleshy arpeggios, abstract motions and a charmingly sinister sound is what you’re trying to grasp. There’s nothing to hold on to, but there’s everything to hear. To the more classic dark wave experimental with darker intentions, that utilize more of the minimal synth phenomenon when it steps up to the plate. Sweeping synthesizers that forms the textures, with thin threads around the cocoon. When they play around a little bit more with the industrialized and constant rhythm of both their cold wave, the spacious sounds and the minimal synth – heads are turned on their tails. You’d feel obligated to vocalize it together with the vocalist, as she for the first time spread out more of her unorthodox arrhythmic wings. Here, the synthesizers become more grandiose, as every melody is being used to convince you that the layers upon layers of goodness is meant to be for you. It feels personal, with no strings attached, and no pretensions to be found. Deep, from within their hearts, this is for you. I can surely recommend this release, because it is some of the better dark wave mixed with other genres as a crossover, that I have heard for a long time. Especially the last song. Unfortunately the EP is already sold out, but you can listen to it down below.

a1178281350_10DUST, on the other hand, is something different. Even though the common denominator is electronic music. Featuring the collective of korean noise goddess Greem Jellyfish, psych musician/model Angela Chambers, tech audio engineer Michael Sherburn and DJ John Barclay. Originally an dark italo project, now a “combat” techno meets acid house phenomenon. Their intentions are great, as their machines continually pound out the analogue wondrous of acidic textures upon psychedelic longing, in the form of wailing. Consisting of rhythms that would easily punch you in the face and not apologize for it. You’ll have your feet stomping to this as you make your way through this four-tracked explosion of influences. Whilst it tries to re-direct your attention from the bombastic tones, it will suddenly begin to smack your face around with its virtually unchallenged beats that make every techno-maniac shy away in displeasure. Not because it’s bad, but because it is so heavy. This is both as crazy as it can get, with the overtly psychedelic screams and insane vocals. Brace yourself, as the reverberated madness strikes you with provocative lines of futuristic synthesizers, together with charred and spontaneous hits with the electronic hammer. Whatever you’d want to fit in here, is fitted. Whether it consists of quirky synthesizers that graciously show you how to move, or if it is aggressively stomping its way through your living room. Even though some of the italo makes itself noticeable within the rhythms and the melodies, they leave far more space for other influences to grow strong and every single member adds their expertise to fulfill their sacred challenge of introducing this irrational mixture to you as a listener. The more you try to understand it, the more mysterious it gets. Don’t turn your back, because this is freakishly potent stuff. So, whether you like acid house or prefer some stompy techno, or simply just want to “chill” out to some italo influences – everything is for you. But I should warn you, this is a deadly mix in between the borders of these three genres. You should enter at your own risk, because there’s a big risk involved with listening to this. Because you might get hooked directly. There are two copies left of this release, so I suggest you make a run for it, over here. You can also listen to it down below.

Darklight: Last Light – Last Light

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I’ll have to admit, I’m not an innocent human being. When it comes to trip-hop, I mostly despise it. But when it’s combined with other genres, such as darker electronica like coldwave or industrial – I will be hooked immediately, if it’s properly executed. This is Last Light, they’re a duo consisting of Laura Boland and Jeremy Moss, whom are currently situated in Brooklyn. They released their self-titled debutalbum “Last Light” two months ago. Unfortunately for you, I didn’t find it until now. It feels like they’re a part of a wider spectrum, or a wave if you’d like to call it that – which has (mostly) been brought upon us from the US. These minimalistic torches that have been carried from the East to the West in the US, slowly making their way to Europe – landing in Northern Europe, this time around. What differs, is that they blend in trip-hop in the mix. The sincere and whispering voice of Laura Boland is enough to have you hooked for hours. Simply by listening to the blistering synthesizers revolving around her or Jeremy Moss. But I most concur, she’s a part of the wonderfully esoteric machinery of darkness, which can be felt by the stinging of a wrecking arpeggio that slices your heart in parts. Look no further, because this might also be the uniform split between the heavy electronics and more classical vocals. At times, however, it feels like the abomination that is and has been some of the dark electro – for a long time. If you ignore that part, in some of the songs, it’s actually a memorable album which will take you to new heights. I know that there’s a lot out there right now, but this one is a given if you want to stir the potpurri of influences a bit. So take a listen, because it’s definitely worth it, seven times over. The release features five songs and was released by themselves on the 18th of March.

Deadlight: Skinny Reptile Youth – EP

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Well, if Crystal Castles and Atari Teenage Riot had a baby? This would be the end result. It’s a two man project, where the duo that is Skinny Reptile Youth collaborate, as they’re in two different countries. Namely: Italy and Spain. Even though their latest release “EP” is unmixed and unmastered, it sounds pretty rad. Think of some of the danceable rave sound of the 90’s, mixed with dark wave and witch-house. With an element of 8-bit smashed to pieces within the sound-scape. At times it sounds peculiar, at times their sound sear through my ears. Wondrous, in a dark time, in an encroached bastion of atonal madness and rhythmic destruction. Featuring the same apathetic sound graced by the looks of the mainstream, by far from it all together. Crackling spacious synthesizers brush against the cliffs of sound, that is pouring down upon the listener. To top it off, the ever changing landscape of audacity, noisy calmness and unfathomable ingenuity. If anything, it’s a case that is deplorable but at the same time adoring. Degeneration with flowers of grace, futurism with years of old. At times despicable and vile, at times fierce like fire. Some of the songs might not be that great, but if they get to develop their own sound even further – it might just be channeled into their future selves. Featuring songs ranging from “White Forest” to “Black Mouth“, released in a D.I.Y. fashion. If any label reads this, listen through their music down below and look into it.

Exclusive Stream: ‹‹ʘ›› – When I Grow Up (feat. The Kid’s Corpses)

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Maybe you’d like a little bit of scaled experimental, or an avant-garde sense of perception. If you’re a fan of Karin Dreijers solo-project Fever Ray, you might be engulfed by the concrete ambition of re-discovering them in a different sense. The sound-scape is ambiguous in one sense, under produced in another. As ‹‹ʘ››, also known by the Japanese name of Kurogokegum (meaning ‘Black Widow’) – is the moniker of polish-born Nigel Kills. Originally, his music was intended to be inagurated in the now more fashionable witch house genre, which arrived in late 2008 and early 2009. His outfit is also part of never being seen, never being heard and to mask himself from the eye of the public.

Since this has been the case for a long time, I decided to contact him and write about his music. Though this wasn’t only the case, two songs from his forthcoming acoustic mini-album; “The Wolf: Acoustic Sessions” – will be released on Invisible Guy. Today you’ll get the opportunity to listen to the song “When I Grow Up (feat. The Kid’s Corpses)“, which is a somnambulist showcase, and cover, of the Fever Ray song “When I Grow Up“. Another opportunity and another song will be premiered tomorrow, but for today, you can listen to that track down below.

Review: Ēv of Isis – Dark Ambition (C17)

2636680941-1Suggestive, ethereal and sublime. In these times. Darkwave from the yonder, integrated into and from an heretical perspective. This collaboration between Sweden’s Josefin Hinders (Forest) and San Diego’s Amanda Schoepflin (Cathedral X) is an entirely new state of mind. With the first track “Mezzy (Intro)“, the primitive and carnal energies of both genres cloud the proper judgement. Some of it seems to be unhindered, cloaked and brutal at a first listen – but after a while the tears of joy stream down each cheek. It might not be the rightful inheritor of newly emerged dark-wave, but it has its different energies, suggestive rhythms and utterly experimental edge – to show off. At times it simply feels too basic and untempered to listen to. Simplicity blended with experimentalism doesn’t go all that well, hand in hand. Which is what can be thought about this song too. Sure, there are openings of ethereal mystery and hints of structured melodies, with undercurrents of pure darkness.

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Review: Lebanon Hanover – Gallowdance

2824239920-1Lebanon Hanover have a new release, freshly cut and mixed, ready for us on their table. Catering to our strengths and weaknesses, with the first track “Gallowdance” they blend the best minimalism with the overtly dark hemorrhage of cold wave nostalgia. Firstly covering our hands in mud, as you try to reach into their world with your hand. Melancholia is strong in this world, it’s also a conjuration from the abhorrent use of shady riffs and a continuous baseline that rips through the cold gaze of yesteryear. Whilst dancing in a landscape so barren one could almost point a finger in any direction and still see no structures in the near midst, see no hope in front of the two eyes steadily fixating themselves upon what have been. It’s no more and the usage of the Anglo-Saxon language and the German fluttered whispers, you’re on a multidimensional trip, apt for the misanthrope of modernity. One layer of language, to chalk the empty souls and two layers of both minimalism and suggestiveness – what kind of messages are being projected? You can only tell, with fluency in each language, what is what and which is which. It feels like you’re slowly moving out of each layer, stripped of your own security and unmasked in front of the naysayers. Take one step to the side, hear their vocals sip through the cracks of each hole in the house. Feel them coming closer. Everything seems to be what it isn’t, as Lebanon Hanover is the only ones with the cure in a near proximity, you’ll feel hopelessness indulging you and itself. Dissolving into a unity of both man and despair.

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