Review: Die Selektion – Deine Stimme Ist Der Ursprung Jeglicher Gewalt

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aufnahme + widergabe have gotten the privilege to release the second album by Die Selektion, late May. Last time they released an album was six years ago, their first self-titled album on Fabrika Records. Much have changed since then and it is a more refined and interesting Die Selektion that can be found with their newest album “Deine Stimme Ist Der Ursprung Jeglicher Gewalt“. The album is roughly thirty-four minutes long.

“Schatten”, the first song off the release, is a really emotional trip. A song which slowly develops and jabs you straight in the heart. There’s so much nostalgia to be had while listening to it, essentially a very good introductory. Here darkwave meet electronic body music and dance music in an odd combination – add to that a trumpet and you’re set. It is interesting how it builds up and then unleashes mayhem upon the listener. Rhythms are on point and you’re caught up with the motions of the baselines, synthesizers and vocals. A certain distraught tone is brought out by the vocalist, making the setting even more postapocalyptic then it could’ve been otherwise.

There is really a perfect groove between the trumpet and the thumping baseline. One discovers complex melodies layered upon one another in perfect synchrony. It hits very deep just before it fades out into nothingness – there’s something really touching about how the atmosphere goes from energetic – to sullen and accepting of its own fate. Personally, there’s not been many songs that hit as deep as this one, the only exception being the repertoir of Keluar. That’s a good point of reference when it comes to how expressive the song really is.

WhenUnter Die Haut” storms in with the alluring electronic body music á la Schwefelgelb – one is immediately hooked. Repeated in this song is the atmospheric notion of the previous song, but with an extended prescence of the trumpet which gives it a huge sound. Sharp baselines tear through whilst the attendance of the synthesizer sounds make for enjoyable rhythms. One thing that is more characteristic of this song is the presence of the vocalist – he tears through like nothing with an attitude perfectly in tune with the bombasticness of the soundscape.

Not much more can be said about the song as such. It translates perfectly into “Dir & Mir“, whose atmosphere is more focused in terms of the percussion. Added into the mix is a guitar that doesn’t leave you hanging with meaningless riffs. Everything is in tune with each individual song and the laid back style in this one captures the attitude perfectly. There’s a discipline, a decadence and a retrospective imagined into sound. An unnatural blend of genres that shouldn’t have been – but became something more then a transgression into awfulness.

“Kalter Atem” almost catches one off-guard in terms of how the intro makes one expect the awfulness of aggro-tech to leap into the mix and ruin everything. Sadly enough, the beats in this song aren’t really much to cheer for. They do nothing more then keep the rhythm steady, although monotonous – it is bad monotony. The atmosphere don’t develop until the song is almost over anyway. It gives the air of being intermission before the continuation of the next half of the album.

Brennende Brücken” is really minimalistic – giving the vocalist more space to shine. Together with the low-key trumpets in this one, it adds a more sincere touch and you feel closer attached to the musicians as such. It is hard to explain, but the immaculate use of sampling and the tearfelt delivery of the vocalist reeks of passion. The further in you get, more experimentalism is added – which makes it feel like something new in electronica. As the melodies are intimately attached but so far away from one another in the atmosphere, it gives off a really nice vibe.

Wow, the intro on “Der Himmel Explodiert (feat. Drangsal)” stir things around even more. The depths of the synthesizers is a nice touch – and then, suddenly, electronic body music in its purest form is added to the mix. There’s a more exotic kind of atmosphere in this song and you really can’t get enough of the trumpets. As Drangsal is introduced, there’s a noticeable shift to the more upbeat and lighter soundscape. It is a nice addition which makes it more distinguishable from the other songs one already have listened to. The outro is what the intro of this song was but it is perfect the way it is.

If rhythm was something lacking earlier, in comparison with melody, “Der Augenblick” adds even more ambitious percussionism – giving it a multi-layered, energetic switch into danceable electronic music. You’re given an acute sense of controlled chaos. Because it is “The Moment” – which would’ve been cheesy had it been in english instead of german. For some moments one is not sure if it is about to go full-on psy-trance or if it won’t go astray at all. This goes to show what they are capable of and that they don’t limit themselves to formulaic songs, because everything is well thought out and dynamic.

Dein Hertz Wiegt Tausend Scherben” feels very retro. The synthesizers in this song add mystery into their music. It is quite a straight-forward song but the melodies are some of the nicest on this record so far. Dreamy, but saturnine to the core. The constant use of the trumpet in almost each song is about what the saxophone is to 80-90’s action movies – though the main difference would be that it never gets tiresome. Max Rieger have really outdone himself and Die Selektion were right to add his instrument into the mix. The casualness of the vocals is also another thing of note in this song – they seem so unforced and authentic. Lyrically speaking it is very good in all its simplicity.

Deine Stimme“, the last song on this album, really says something about where they might be heading next with future releases. There’s a heavier, more experimental tone to the synthesizers and the vocalist concludes the record mysteriously. Reverberated voices and noisy rambunctiousness – a cyberpunk feeling. A clarity, a mission of something even more grandiose. After having listened to this album it feels empty, especially when the last song in the end of it builds up something that might’ve even been a tenth song. aufnahme + wiedergabe really knew what they had assembled when releasing this.

Listen to the release down below in full and if it is alluring to you – buy one or both of the physical releases. Currently available on limited edition CD and vinyl.

 

 

[16th] December: Yves Malone – Yellow Sweater & Junos

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One of our favorite synthwave acts as of late, Yves Malone, have chosen to grace us with an appearance for Ljudkalendern. For those who don’t know, he’s been featured in three reviews and premieres on Repartiseraren, back when Field Hymns compiled three of his earlier released albums into a box-set of cassettes. Since then he’s also released a separate album called “Ebony Sunrise“, on Orange Milk Records. What’s unique about him is how he manages to transfer soundtrack-music out of the box and into proper synthesized music, instead of it sounding exactly like a soundtrack is to sound – if you’ve ever had that feeling of how you can distinguish between the two. Which we’ve had plenty of times. That kind of transcendental move is hard to make when you’re not able to think outside of the box, which Yves is certainly very capable of at least musically. There’s always a thin line between. He crosses them all and it resonates throughout the atmospheres of his songs. Even though a box like the one on Field Hymns have a certain purpose, that had been cemented way before it was re-released, we like his craftsmanship and ambition when it comes to layering synthesizers over one another, creating a heavenly output for both dismay and happiness. Both rhythm, overlapping textures of synthesizers and melodies are important building blocks for his music. We don’t know how he so carelessly pulls all of this off.

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For Ljudkalendern it was originally intended to be an already produced song he had stashed away, from somewhere. As we haven’t had the time to write freely as we’ve wished, we therefore asked Mr. Yves for a concoction that would be linear in theme, but irregular when it comes to the music. Well, maybe not that structured. We proposed that he should produce a completely new track and out came two. Two different tracks both in general atmosphere, but also because one of them, “Yellow Sweater” is more beat and rhythm-oriented, whilst “Junos” take an upper-hand when it comes to perfectly laid melodies that make the whole thing a lot funkier. In a way we’re reminded of a synthwave Group Rhoda, if there ever would be one. A tropical rhythm with playing synthesizers that act as triggers for the rhythm in some cases, but when the melodies come together and shape a grandiose melody everything starts to roll down the hill and become even more exciting. First it fades out, feels like it is rebooting and slowly builds up a baseline that holds up the melodic construction. We give you these two newly procued tracks to stream exclusively for Ljudkalendern and the 16th December – on Repartiseraren!

[13th] December: Acapulco City Hunters – Chaser

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Acapulco. A Mexican municipality but mainly a city, with as many as 234 communities—the most populous being Acapulco itself—with 673 479 inhabitants as of 2010, 85,25% of the people reside in the city. When counting the most populous cities except the main one, which are: Xaltianguis, Kilómetro 30, Tres Palos, San Pedro las Playas, Amatillo—the population combined account for 3,25% of the whole municipality, making it 25857 inhabitants in total, one starts to wonder where the rest of the 11,5% have gone. Where are the other cities? Are there smaller towns, considering there are so many communities? Questions remained unanswered. Here are when Acapulco City Hunters come in – it seems like they’re looking for an answer to that question. Maybe they’re straying away, in metaphors and synonyms, but they’re probably concerned.

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Or maybe, just maybe – we’ve been tricked by these con-artists. Making us think of Mexico as the main inspiration for their name, specifically related to the aforementioned questions, but it can also mean “Goin’ to Acapulco“—a track from “Dylan Basement Tapes” (1976), and I paraphrase from an outtake from Sid Griffin’s book “Million Dollar Bash” – from the source Shelton, Robert (1986)—music-journalist Clinton Heylin commented on its sexual innuendo: …featuring the usual debauched narrator, rambunctious harmonies, and euphemistic ribaldry according to Wikipedia. We can see how both sexual innuendos are fitted in a musical environment, influenced or not by either Sid Griffin’s book, Basement Tapes, or Mexico’s ‘lost’ cities and/or communities. A lot of the topics seem to suggest a strong influence of either everything – or simply one of the things listed above.

It’s interesting to note how Acapulco City Hunters is in plural, though other things like ‘his’ patchwork blog “Cosmic Beam“—suggests otherwise. Maybe since the Facebook-page is categorized as a “Community“, rather than an Artist-page, could reveal certain other possible theories. Pluralis it is because it suits the influences for ‘his’ project. If you get the reference we’re trying to make here, you’ve got a good sense of detail. The music-making dates back two years, from when he released “Haunted Bombai“—later to have a remix of the song by “DYSWIL“—filmed by Thomas Skrobek. Apparently a collective (now defunct?) named: “Negative Beat“. One of the actors’ names (Juliette Mellard) suggest that it really is a project born and based in France—collecting individual influences elsewhere.

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He’s also done a good rendition of; Marianne Faithfull‘s “Broken English“, originally released on LP in the UK 1979, via Island Records—now a sub-division to Universal Music Group. Though we’re not enthusiasts of Marianne’s intonation – we respect and understand such an immense contribution to England’s—and the world’s—music-life that she, and her discography have revealed throughout the years. With added minimalist synthesizers and a stripped-down not as extravagant atmosphere, Acapulco City Hunters make me like “Broken English“, and take the song for what it is – albeit in a completely new way. We must say that nothing beats an original, not even an original you’re not so delighted to hear in the first place, but they do a perfectly okay effort. We’re sorry to say that the bleep-synthesizer sound is too loud, which takes away part of the experience of listening.

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Now I won’t go any further into his discography, more than note that I have written about the split he did with Luminance, titled “The Cold Rush“. Sure, most of it sounds alike when listening through once in a while, but there are certain characteristics that Acapulco City Hunters had developed—that I heard when I had listened to it for a while. We prefer when he doesn’t overcharge on his ethnic vibes. When he keeps it nice and tidy, melodically ambitious and switches between different modes of electronica – is when he’s at his peak. This was exactly what he did with that release. Ironically enough he sings about evolution in “Magdalena” and evolved he has—at least musically. Recently, he also was featured in a track he did together with Luminance—on the “The Broken Window Theory“—a newly released compilation on Wool-E Records.

For Ljudkalendern he gives us, on the 13th December, unfortunately with a delayed article, a song titled “Chaser” – which might actually be the musical hunt for Acapulco. It seems to be something defining him, at the same time cranking up the tempo to maximum—making way for a spastic and erratic synthesizer-driven track. It’s a newly produced song for the purpose of this non-commercial collection – not compilation. We hope that you’ll take a bit of his musical concept with you in your thoughts after you’ve heard it—as delicate as it is forceful.

Listen: Zarkoff – The Big Ripoff

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Exquisite but ominous electro and techno are out in favor for a more classic 1990’s rave and techno sound. Mute the melodies and come into your groove with a harsh acid baseline that will make you go bananas. This is exactly what Zarkoff has done when he for a moment strayed away from his original sound and decided to go full-on tribalistic rave and classic techno in “The Big Ripoff“. The spirit of the track is not tainted by what he himself thinks is a huge rip-off, because even though a lot of people are going to reminiscence about the good old days – his craftsmanship shines through yet again – so don’t be so harsh on yourself. It’s a perfectly unplanned gesture that shields us when we’re heading into the colder months of the year – the warmth of his track is what keeps you grooving.

After I’ve listened through it a few times I’ve come to appreciate it even more and I hope Zarkoff changes route completely and starts to heave acid house or classic techno music at us, hopefully in a raver’s setting of neon lights and with a drugged out atmosphere. Or maybe he should go full-on gabber so he can be acredited of reviving a genre whose life is in a total stalemate nowadays. What ever he chooses to do, nobody can deny that he’s skilled at what he does and that his transformations are what keep you listening to his music. Anyway, you can stream the track down below or download it for free.

Some questions for Ray Creature!

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Ray Creature is a band that I thoroughly admire since hearing their first release “Don’t Stop Talking EP” which was recently put out on NO! Record Label. Both of them are Americans and I first thought they were a band, but they’re actually a duo. This duo is compromised of Jon Erich Booth and Natascha Buehnerkemper, having been Jon’s solo-project at first it transformed into a duo. Which is both surprising, since most of their sound is so underrated and explicitly great that I actually wouldn’t have thought that it would’ve not been a band, but hey, here they are. Right after their first release they actually had another one which is getting put out by Sister Cylinder, a full-length S/T debut album. I wanted to clear out some things that I wanted to have answered, so I put out a series of questions which they answered. JEB stands for Jon Erich Booth and NB stands for Natascha Buehnerkemper. Enjoy it. You might also enjoy the freely downloadable track “White Suits” – taken from their S/T debut.

It’s interesting to note that you’re a duo. I would’ve expected it to be a whole band, considering the variety in your sound. Why are you a duo and not a whole band?

JEB: – That’s an effect of layering instrumentation. We take ideas from No Wave and other minimal aesthetics, but our music is in no way minimal. If a song calls for more instrumentation, we add it. Natascha and I have similar ideas about music, and we’ve found ways to reproduce the songs live, so adding more musicians seems unnecessary at this point. Anyway, it’s hard to find people who won’t dilute ideas with compromises or conflicting theories about how the music should work.

NB: – Ray Creature actually started out as Jon’s solo project, and I joined in August of last year. My addition brought along with it the possibility to add even more dimension, both live and recorded. When we play live, there’s so much going on in the backing tracks, having just two of us brings a minimal element to the live shows that is counter to the complexity of the music, which I think makes it more exciting. On another note, being a duo as opposed to a whole band gives us a lot more flexibility regarding touring and shows. Less scheduling bullshit to deal with.

You started out with three demo-tracks and later on you were picked up by NO! Record Label, or how did it go by? What went into recording “Don’t Stop Talking”?

JEB: – When we played a show with Dry Socket, Dylan Ettinger couldn’t make it so Joseph McGlone, the founder of NO!, filled in on synth. After the show he expressed interest in putting out a cassette tape. We had already been producing the self-titled LP with Scott Ferguson of Sister Cylinder Records, so we took an extended version of the opening track, “Don’t Stop Talking,” and three other tracks that didn’t make it on the record and packaged them together as the “Don’t Stop Talking” EP.

“Don’t Stop Talking” is our modest attempt at an austere funk track. Like most of our songs it started with drum machine and bass. The interplay of the guitar, my and Natascha’s vocals, and the lead synth followed from an attempt to keep an unvarying bass line interesting over the course of several minutes.

NB: – I view the “Don’t Stop Talking” EP as a companion release to our LP. It seems that it might be confusing to have two separate releases coming out at the same time on different formats, but in my mind the cassette release was perfectly timed. Even though some of the songs didn’t make it onto the LP, I think they’re really great, and they fit well with the LP aesthetically. It’s possible that we could end up going in a slightly different direction with our future releases, so it’s exciting that all the songs from this songwriting phase were able to make it onto some physical format at once.

Why did you decide to go with such a varied sound, was it the result of experimentation during a long period?

JEB: – I try not to over-determine the music with genre requirements or restrictions. Each song points in its own direction and writes itself to some degree. That’s to say, a set of elements in a song will suggest further styles of instrumentation, which lead to unexpected sounds and song structures. This can create weird stylistic juxtapositions, but it also sets up dramatic transitions within songs, which I think is one of our strengths. For better or worse, that’s the only way I’ve been successful at songwriting while keeping myself interested. There are enough people writing minimal, genre consistent electronic music —I don’t see myself contributing much of interest to that.

NB: – It actually opens us up to being flexible for different shows. Depending on the bands with which we’re playing, we might decide to play our more poppy, dancy tunes. Or we might decide that it’s more appropriate to go a more abrasive, dark route. Since our songs tend to go in a few different directions, it really opens us up to being able to play with lots of different types of bands.

You’re going to have a self-titled debut album out in June with another label called Sister Cylinder. I also noted that you’ve gotten mastering help from Mahern Audio. Have you been mastering your releases on your own before this, or what? How did it feel to have your debut mastered there?

JEB: – I recorded the self-titled LP and recorded and mastered the “Don’t Stop Talking” EP, but I’m an amateur engineer and a dilettante mastering engineer. Since I’m untrained I end up trying too hard in that area. I was exhausted with recording by the time we had the LP mastered by Mahern. I felt relieved to have songs taken out of my hands and began trying desperately and unsuccessfully to forget about them forever. I’m proud of them, but I’ve grown to hate them in some ways. They’re like time-sucking kids I was ready to kick out of the house. Any opinion I have about them is by now irrelevant.

Since you’re going to play a lot of shows in the near future, what are your experiences when playing live? In what way are you stoked for your future performances?

JEB: – We now know the songs well enough to occasionally forget we’re playing them, which is ideal. I like presenting the music at shows, but from the perspective of live performance, the idea is to let the songs go and be inside them rather than exert control over them. We’re touring with Bad Psychic, another electronic act from Bloomington, which is a pleasure because the music is great and the style works with ours. So I’ve been looking forward to every show.

NB: – We’re writing to you right now from Nashville, TN on our third day of a two-week tour. I think this is true of most bands, but people get the best idea of what we’re like from our live performances. We play pretty loudly with a lot of speakers and the live, often repetitive drum parts add an element of intensity that I think people find entertaining, even if they may not be digging what we’re actually playing. It’s always hugely rewarding to see people in the crowd looking pumped about what we’re doing, and it’s a huge payoff for all the hard work we put into this.

It’s nice to be having a freely downloadable track from you. Could you tell me something about it and also what’s in store for you in the coming months?

JEB: – “White Suits” is what passes for another Ray Creature dance track. There was some debate over whether or not to include it on the LP because of its length and atmosphere, but I think it ultimately worked. I tend to think of it as an alternate approach to ideas we were trying to get at with “Don’t Stop Talking.”

In the coming months we hope to start recording our second LP. The plan is to write more relentlessly aggressive songs and incorporate more of Natascha’s vocals alongside my own. Beyond that, we hope it will inspire some confused sexual feelings in people who thought they weren’t confused to begin with—the noblest ambition of rock music.

Down below you can find the track “White Suits” which is freely downloadable as a part of this questionnaire. Hope you enjoy it and do listen to their sound from their own Bandcamp, too, as a complement. If you want to buy it, you should check out Sister Cylinder.

Exclusive Premiere: Suren Unka – Weather Science

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Suren Unka. You might’ve heard of him, or you might’ve not. He’s a descendant from India living in New Zealand, raised in the town of Opotoki, currently living in Auckland. The name he’s chosen for himself is derived from his real name, which is Suren Raj Unka. Earlier, he’s been a part of the group Ponnyfight together with Fergus Burnett, and now he’s released his own album on CD titled “El Chupacabra“. We re-visit some kind of bizarre turn into ambient dubstep of some sort, where the atmosphere is the most important for the almost clerical melodies that can be heard. It stands clear that it’s influenced very much by the modern electronica that has sprung up in the 2000’s. Currently, Suren is educating himself at MAINZ (Music and Audio Institute of New Zealand). Even though his music seem to be far from what I’ve been doing, I just had to have something to do with it. I must say that I despise dubstep as such, but this modern variant which clings to some of the elements of that genre, it also lets free some IDM influences, danceable ambient and other very interesting combinations. The build-ups in the structure of the tracks come from a heavy melodic content which is supplied with sampling, just to hit the climactic peak together with the baseline that itself – also is melodic as hell. So this might turn some of you off, but I guess that others will listen to it with an “open” ear, if you know what I mean. He actually contacted me via e-mail and we came to the conclusion that a track should be put up by me.

So, that’s exactly what I did a couple of days ago. The track “Weather Science” from his newly released debut-album “El Chupacabra” was put up on my Soundcloud. Just so you could hear it from yourself and get a taste of what was to come from this release. The unreleased track is up and running, and the album itself has just been self-released by Suren. Listen to this bizarre mixture of different genres and stream, but listen to, this track so you know if you want the whole album or not. It has been put out on iTunes so you can buy it. But make up your mind first and listen to the track down below.

Exclusive Premiere: Kord feat Annie – Control

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Playful synth-pop with that odd Börft angle when it comes to rhythm and melody. Börft Records have been the sole proprietor of Johan Sturesson‘s own project Kord at first, but he’s switched to different labels during his years, releasing material on his own label Råsynth I Blekinge, Djuring Phonogram and just before this release, on the Malmö-based Rundgång Rekords in 2013. When he’s not busy with his own solo-project, he’s also one of the brainiacs in Frak, a rather mystic and anonymous group at first – but a national jewel for Sweden’s odd electronica-lovers. He’s also been involved in an off-shoot duo with Daniel Svraka (Adolf Filter), called Monster Apparat, with whom they released the double-single “Moster Dajm / Rymdmotstånd” on the Kernkrach sub-label Hertz-Schrittmacher back in 2009. It would seem like the ironic touch of Börft Records have been appropriated on every project that is related to it. A kind of Swedish humor, with a touch of Blekinge in it. A certain kind of humor that is very funny if you’re tired, but also if you’re working with music for most of the time. In Sweden we call it “torr humor“, which means “dry humor“, but do not let it take you astray from the wonderful music that is being produced. This is only when it comes to some of the song-titles and titles of releases by him. Rather than being an insult, it’s a good thing when they first incorporated this humor into it. In regards to the artists and groups that have had their material released on Börft. So when Kord finally is releasing something new, he’s including Annie Gyllin on vocals, making it an album that features her brass attitude amidst a carnage of weird synth-pop, electronic body mayhem and dance-music.

This release is being put out by the Enfant Terrible sub-label Gooiland Elektro which deals with everything from dark electro to experimental electronica. A four-tracked released titled “We Live In This 12¨ is being put out upon this label, the first release from Kord since a year back when older songs were released as “Midsummer Night Special“, together with a collaborative track featuring Glenn Stenbring and Rebecca Lindell, called “Boy” – which was recorded in 2005 as a school-project of his. Anyway, Repartiseraren have been in a collaborative effort together with Martijn who’s the label-boss of both Enfant Terrible and Gooiland Elektro, where I’ve had the honor to put out exclusive tracks from coming releases. This is also one of these efforts, as we give to you the track “Control” which is featured on the B-side of this release, for you to exclusively stream from Repartiseraren. As I’m re-launching my platform, this comes rather unexpected, but I welcome it and would like to thank Martijn for his continued faith in my blog-zine. Hook your stereo in, put your headphones on, lay back in your chair or what ever you find pleasurable to be resting in – and tune in for this weird mixture of the best of many worlds of electronica. Stream the track down below and pre-order the vinyl from the Enfant Terrible webshop. First edition comes in 100 copies of pink vinyl, second edition in 200 copies in black vinyl. Expected to be released at the end of April.

Listen: Xakatawaga, Blue Krishna, Bad User Experience and David Allen!

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Finally, the four releases that were incorporated into the MMXIV Winter catalog at Nostilevo, are released. Neal Samples may be the one behind the moniker Xakatawaga, as you otherwise know him as Tollund Men, but also as the proprietor of Bleak Environment – an independent label, based out of America – that specializes in industrial, noise and black metal. The repetitive motion that is released with “Vol. 1“, which is the first release under this moniker, reminds me a lot of schranz techno, except the fact that the basis for it is more or less based on the off-shoot of techno, mixed in with industrial experimentalism and rhythmic noise. Bob your head from one place to another, as this bleak and repetitive notion keeps on rolling by – watered down by psychedelic hallucinations. Conjugating with the rough winds beneath, extracting and putting in place – what makes industrial so harsh and barren in the first place. Transgressing the narrative that techno is only techno, crossing over into unorthodox territories to make the combination even more wild and interesting. Four tracks that span up to 23 minutes in length, if added together. Featured by their names, in correct order; “Uay“, “Blue Soul“, “Cygne” and “Nu Contact”. Buy this release for 7 dollars if you want a cassette, or 6 dollars if you want it digitally. I’d suggest you getting the physical release instead of the digital, since it’s only 1 dollar more and you get something you can hold on to.

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Being one of the most interesting releases in this batch of four, Blue Krishna makes the best of what you can take from new-wave and slap their own electronic vibe onto it. It’s in the atmosphere of industrial as such, making use of the experimental nature, forcing their own synth-popish backstab, into the psychedelic trench. Alex Jarson from Body Of Light, which can be heard when you listen to it, shapes his own form of badness through Krishna. Yes, that was a really lame joke. But influences from that project can be heard in this as well. Having been tightly affiliated with Ascetic House under his aforementioned moniker, made it to Chondritic Sound in the end, and transformed into Bad Krishna for his place to be – which came to be Nostilevo. The project delivers the most interesting differentiations, as lavish synth-pop with industrial drums is turning its way into your consciousness. Leaving you with some hope, since it’s only beginning. With a ceremonious chant applied to a dance-rhythm infused into the harsh landscapes of industrial. Clocking in at 23 minutes, roughly, when all songs are added up. The album is titled “Repeat Until Death” and feature the four tracks; “Can’t See The Line“, “Taman Shud“, “Mayflower Spring” and “Rising Sun (It’s Just Beginning)“. Buy the digital release for 6 dollars and the physical cassette for 7 dollars. It seems like a lot comes out from Los Angeles, and that a lof ot it never leaves. But we’re now left with Bad Krishna. Even though it is hard to understand, it’s probably among one of the more unique sounds I’ve heard in my life.

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This is one of those projects that you wouldn’t care too much about in the beginning, but the more you listened to it, the more it enthralled you. Bad User Experience‘s release “CGi” feature a lot of tracks that have been featured elsewhere, like the track “Look NE Direction” that was on the “Industrialized [FROM] Sense” mixtape that came out last year, here on Invisible Guy. This is a total mind-bender, which allude to the more bizarre sounds that can be fitted into different categories, if at all. There’s certainly a sci-fi influence, which shouldn’t be hard to hear at all, and it basically feels like drifting into a black hole and experiencing it from within – with all the absurdities that come with it. Or maybe, if you’d incorporate the phenomenon déja vu into music-making, with the main difference; of it happening every second that you’re producing anything. Some of it is lo-fi groove in a can, other things are re-hashed hits evolving into an industrial mess of danceable beats. I believe you’ll have to have some kind of substance in you to make any sense of it as a whole. Which is certainly not anything I would recommend, but it seems to be that way. This release has six tracks and they come in the order of: “FORUM“, “The Matrix The Movie“, “BLACK HOLE BRENDAN“, “DESIGNegative“, “Look NE Direction” and “WATSMATTU“. It can be bought digitally for 6 dollars, and physically in the form of a cassette, for 7 dollars.

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It’s time for something more outdrawn. In the sense of longer tracks, more specifically. David Allen is the last one in the batch of these four cassette-releases, with his collection of three tracks titled “1188 OST (Sections I​-​III)“, which follows an abstract theme. Gradually shifting from noise in the first section, to claustrophobic industrial in the third section. It gets louder and more noisier, and then it suddenly cools off and gradually shifts to getting even louder. The inherent meaning behind this release is something that is unknown to me. He explores the different modes and settings, in which he makes music with. But this could be considered to be virtual non-music, and someone else should try to explain it more thoroughly. I must say that this release might just be for people whom are interested in experimental and noise, but also in the different subtle changes that can be made within the time-span as long as over 12 minutes. Because some of it I don’t get, and some of it is frightening. If you leave your telephone laying besides the holder, this is probably the noise it would make. Anyway, it clocks in at roughly 30 minutes all-in-all. The tracks are as follows: “Section 1“, “Section 2” and “Section 3“. It can be bought digitally for 6 dollars, and physically in the form of a cassette, for 7 dollars. So if you’re deeply entrenched in noise, this would be something considered well-worth of being bought.

Spotlight: Vundabar – Antics

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Sometimes, it’s hard to come by a really quirky but serious band. Sometimes, you’ll simply have to fish in a sea – empty of fish. I threw a grenade down into the sea and up came a jolly fellow. Their name is Vundabar, a band from Boston, consisting of the duo Brandon Hagen and Drew McDonald. Their debutalbum goes by the name of “Antics“, which is a neatly packaged and at times, tricky concoction of both electronic influences in their almost exclusively non-electronic music. Feel the vibes of dance(eable) garage rock, with nothing but soft-spoken – and at times; ridiculous lyrical content. Imagine the mightily, and accentuated eccentrics from The Pixies, meeting a whole range of both unemotional and emotional contemptuous gadfly, surfing in with higher speed and energy. Fused with the soft-outspokenness of acoustic splendor. We’re certainly caught in their spiderweb, in the midst of their working shift, where they produce tracks with the swift motion of their hands. Surely, if you’re looking for a duo – you’ll probably hear an orchestra. They sound much larger than they should, since they’re only two people. Technically, there’s nothing you could complain about. Sometimes they venture into rare surf rock territories, with the eccentric overlook of a more outlandish attack on your freakishly generic brain – which craves generic garage rock. But you’ll get something completely different. Probably one of the more enthusiastic and bright-minded music I’ve heard for a while. The optimism, but also snarky cynicism shines through their hallow casket. For now, it’s up there in the top with some of the releases that I’m anticipating in the near future. You’ve outdone yourselves, bright boys – with your snickering smiles and uniquely diverse music. Conquer my heart and I’ll lock you in for at least a short time in my continuum, which is more than anyone else can bargain for, ever. There are eleven tracks on this wonderful album and it was released by themselves on the 24th of April.