[13th] December: Acapulco City Hunters – Chaser

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Acapulco. A Mexican municipality but mainly a city, with as many as 234 communities—the most populous being Acapulco itself—with 673 479 inhabitants as of 2010, 85,25% of the people reside in the city. When counting the most populous cities except the main one, which are: Xaltianguis, Kilómetro 30, Tres Palos, San Pedro las Playas, Amatillo—the population combined account for 3,25% of the whole municipality, making it 25857 inhabitants in total, one starts to wonder where the rest of the 11,5% have gone. Where are the other cities? Are there smaller towns, considering there are so many communities? Questions remained unanswered. Here are when Acapulco City Hunters come in – it seems like they’re looking for an answer to that question. Maybe they’re straying away, in metaphors and synonyms, but they’re probably concerned.

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Or maybe, just maybe – we’ve been tricked by these con-artists. Making us think of Mexico as the main inspiration for their name, specifically related to the aforementioned questions, but it can also mean “Goin’ to Acapulco“—a track from “Dylan Basement Tapes” (1976), and I paraphrase from an outtake from Sid Griffin’s book “Million Dollar Bash” – from the source Shelton, Robert (1986)—music-journalist Clinton Heylin commented on its sexual innuendo: …featuring the usual debauched narrator, rambunctious harmonies, and euphemistic ribaldry according to Wikipedia. We can see how both sexual innuendos are fitted in a musical environment, influenced or not by either Sid Griffin’s book, Basement Tapes, or Mexico’s ‘lost’ cities and/or communities. A lot of the topics seem to suggest a strong influence of either everything – or simply one of the things listed above.

It’s interesting to note how Acapulco City Hunters is in plural, though other things like ‘his’ patchwork blog “Cosmic Beam“—suggests otherwise. Maybe since the Facebook-page is categorized as a “Community“, rather than an Artist-page, could reveal certain other possible theories. Pluralis it is because it suits the influences for ‘his’ project. If you get the reference we’re trying to make here, you’ve got a good sense of detail. The music-making dates back two years, from when he released “Haunted Bombai“—later to have a remix of the song by “DYSWIL“—filmed by Thomas Skrobek. Apparently a collective (now defunct?) named: “Negative Beat“. One of the actors’ names (Juliette Mellard) suggest that it really is a project born and based in France—collecting individual influences elsewhere.

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He’s also done a good rendition of; Marianne Faithfull‘s “Broken English“, originally released on LP in the UK 1979, via Island Records—now a sub-division to Universal Music Group. Though we’re not enthusiasts of Marianne’s intonation – we respect and understand such an immense contribution to England’s—and the world’s—music-life that she, and her discography have revealed throughout the years. With added minimalist synthesizers and a stripped-down not as extravagant atmosphere, Acapulco City Hunters make me like “Broken English“, and take the song for what it is – albeit in a completely new way. We must say that nothing beats an original, not even an original you’re not so delighted to hear in the first place, but they do a perfectly okay effort. We’re sorry to say that the bleep-synthesizer sound is too loud, which takes away part of the experience of listening.

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Now I won’t go any further into his discography, more than note that I have written about the split he did with Luminance, titled “The Cold Rush“. Sure, most of it sounds alike when listening through once in a while, but there are certain characteristics that Acapulco City Hunters had developed—that I heard when I had listened to it for a while. We prefer when he doesn’t overcharge on his ethnic vibes. When he keeps it nice and tidy, melodically ambitious and switches between different modes of electronica – is when he’s at his peak. This was exactly what he did with that release. Ironically enough he sings about evolution in “Magdalena” and evolved he has—at least musically. Recently, he also was featured in a track he did together with Luminance—on the “The Broken Window Theory“—a newly released compilation on Wool-E Records.

For Ljudkalendern he gives us, on the 13th December, unfortunately with a delayed article, a song titled “Chaser” – which might actually be the musical hunt for Acapulco. It seems to be something defining him, at the same time cranking up the tempo to maximum—making way for a spastic and erratic synthesizer-driven track. It’s a newly produced song for the purpose of this non-commercial collection – not compilation. We hope that you’ll take a bit of his musical concept with you in your thoughts after you’ve heard it—as delicate as it is forceful.

Exclusive Premiere: White Christian Male – Infection

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The first thing I would think about when it comes to classic industrial music is – provocation. Many of the artists and groups from back then gained notoriety by doing just that. Whether it came to taboo non-politically correct topics about virtually anything that doesn’t hold root in modern society. Often challenging the “norms” of yesteryear. When it comes to White Christian Male (Dennis Hudson), I don’t really think it holds up to that standard – considering that the tables are now turned and political correctness seep through everything. I’m not sure if he’s trying to be provocative with the name “White Christian Male“, or if he’s paying heed to the white christian male. But it surely is an eye-catcher which makes you want to see what it is like beneath the layer of provocation – intentional or not. His music can be held to a higher degree because of his sheer craftsmanship when it comes to the beats, atmosphere and whatnot. Everything falls in place with an interesting sound.

It came as a surprise to hear a darkwave-coated synth-pop sound when you see the iconography and plus one with one. This held true when it came to his older tracks, which are actually pretty good considering how lame darkwave tend to be in most cases. Since then, he’s transcended his old sound which was marked for departure with his track “Live It Down” on the Chromatin Records compilation “Artificial Selections“. Note that he’s not left the influences taken from darkwave, but rather stripped the melodious synth-pop sound and put a harsh industrial surface down instead. Even though it holds true to some of his other tracks, like covers of “Blue Monday” and “Warm Leatherette” – he’s simulated his way through experimentation – paying his dues to ambient as well. Before he went all out industrial, his covers show an organic process of ridding the more melodious content, stripping the sound down and going into industrial for real – but only in the rhythmically and melodious sense to begin with.

Therefore I have gotten a track from him, namely the seventh track from his forthcoming release on Chromatin Records. The track is titled “Infection” and is featured on an album that will go by the name of “The Jagged Womb“. Hear the mangling sounds that will make a resounding noise each time it crackles skulls. A barren industrial landscape with bleak metal as the only surface you’ll ever feel. Dive down into a steel-bath which is only preserved to hold the utmost contempt towards humanity. A pain that is so real that you can feel it, feel it linger down your spine and leave you breathless. It is an immense experience to listen to “Infection” and I now get to share it with you exclusively. It features a long industrial opening, a first part if you will, which by the second half of it turns into a maelstrom of darkwave, minimal synth and industrial combined. Stream it exclusively down below and see to it that you buy his album when it comes out on Chromatin Records – in October.

Premiere: Peter The Roman – I’m No Loser

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Earlier this month, or the month before it, we were appalled by the sheer brilliance of Peter The Roman. Now he’s set sail with a brand new song, which leaves nothing to wish for. This time around, he’s done a quirky cover of the song “Loser” by the well-known artist Beck. Titled as: “I’m No Loser“, he sweeps us off with his somewhat unpolished dark electro meets experimental vibes. It might not be the best thing he’s delivered, but it’s something you should take a quick listen to and see if it could be something for you.

Exclusive Stream: ‹‹ʘ›› – I’m Not Done (feat. Nijah)

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Maybe you’d like a little bit of scaled experimental, or an avant-garde sense of perception. If you’re a fan of Karin Dreijers solo-project Fever Ray, you might be engulfed by the concrete ambition of re-discovering them in a different sense. The sound-scape is ambiguous in one sense, under produced in another. As ‹‹ʘ››, also known by the Japanese name of Kurogokegum (meaning ‘Black Widow’) – is the moniker of polish-born Nigel Kills. Originally, his music was intended to be inaugurated in the now more fashionable witch house genre, which arrived in late 2008 and early 2009. His outfit is also part of never being seen, never being heard and to mask himself from the eye of the public.

Since this has been the case for a long time, I decided to contact him and write about his music. Though this wasn’t only the case, two songs from his forthcoming acoustic mini-album; “The Wolf: Acoustic Sessions” – will be released on Invisible Guy. Today you’ll get the opportunity to listen to the song “I’m Not Done (feat. Nijah)“, which is an even more scaled cover, of another Fever Ray song called “I’m Not Done“. This is the last song being premiered and you now have an opportunity to stream it, exclusively, here at Invisible Guy.

Exclusive Stream: ‹‹ʘ›› – When I Grow Up (feat. The Kid’s Corpses)

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Maybe you’d like a little bit of scaled experimental, or an avant-garde sense of perception. If you’re a fan of Karin Dreijers solo-project Fever Ray, you might be engulfed by the concrete ambition of re-discovering them in a different sense. The sound-scape is ambiguous in one sense, under produced in another. As ‹‹ʘ››, also known by the Japanese name of Kurogokegum (meaning ‘Black Widow’) – is the moniker of polish-born Nigel Kills. Originally, his music was intended to be inagurated in the now more fashionable witch house genre, which arrived in late 2008 and early 2009. His outfit is also part of never being seen, never being heard and to mask himself from the eye of the public.

Since this has been the case for a long time, I decided to contact him and write about his music. Though this wasn’t only the case, two songs from his forthcoming acoustic mini-album; “The Wolf: Acoustic Sessions” – will be released on Invisible Guy. Today you’ll get the opportunity to listen to the song “When I Grow Up (feat. The Kid’s Corpses)“, which is a somnambulist showcase, and cover, of the Fever Ray song “When I Grow Up“. Another opportunity and another song will be premiered tomorrow, but for today, you can listen to that track down below.