Listen: Genus Inkasso – Under Seals Broken By The Lean Solicitor

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The British are back. At least one Brit, whose name is Joris. J. I don’t know if he is a Brit, but he lives in Britain at least. He’s been manufacturing the most odd noise, the most uncategorizable noise, under this own name since he first released “Untitled”, his first self-released album. A year later he got his first official non-self-released track “Die Antizipation Des Generalized Other“, on the German label Der Schöne Hjuler-Memorial-Fond – a label that seems to be related (or dedicated) to a German art group called Mama Baer und Kommissarie Hjuler. But I’m not really certain of that. Since his two splits done with Ratbag as the first, Filthy Turd as the second, it seems like he stopped making anything under his real name, in 2011. Already back in 2009, he made his first album under the guise of Genus Inkasso, titled “Default Swaps” which was released by Abulia Concepts. However, at the same time that it seemed like he stopped with Joris. J, another album with Genus Inkasso submerged under the title of “Occasionally Slumping, Smiling Weakly“, put out by naboa music. This was in 2011.

Since then, he’s released an album titled “The Despised Pastora” which was put out by Grindcore Karaoke. But that’s not because I’m writing about his music, it’s because his latest mini-album “Under Seals Broken By The Lean Solicitor” was released just roughly two weeks ago on the New York City-imprint Immigrant Breast Nest. The three tracks that are featured on this release range from illbient to a general breakbeat mess, combined with an electro-acoustic layer that keeps everything somewhat in order. It is, however, noticeable that this sounds like something that was just improvised during a session. Take it from that and spin it into some remnant from the 1990’s hardcore-scene in Holland, just to bounce back into some undecipherable combination of noise and spastic movement. Just to have it change into a trip-hop atmosphere after you’ve heard some sampled piano mashed into a drier. Everything can happen between planned happenstance, what’s currently happening and how long it takes for the next thing to occur. It’s just how it goes with Genus Inkasso and his latest release “Under Seals Broken By The Lean Solicitor“. Stream the whole release down below.

Thee Showcase [#8.3]: Torquem, Brou de Noix and twothirtytwo!

1572809631-1Quickly, move fast, we’re at Thee Showcase again. It’s time for another round of great music. First up this time is the band Torquem, which is composed of three guys from Paris. They’ve currently released their latest album “Ansiktet“, which means “the face” in Swedish. Well, I would know, because I am after all a Swede. Delving into their world is a happenstance that would slowly but surely evolve into something greater. The tight rhythms, the suggestive melodies and the emotionally consistent music that they’ve put on for display, blends the best of jazz-influenced intermezzos and post-rock-induced experimentalism from different ages. It feels like you’re on a trip from a time and age to another, whilst you hear the clinging saxophone speak its own language, with fluency, as the baseline drums in another part of the song and; here comes a sample. They call themselves “cinematic rock“, which is something I would agree on. There’s difference changes in the structures, as the melodies change and as every mood is being displayed throughout. This multifaceted piece of music is simply unveiling itself, with ambitious intent, to knock us down on the floor. Ambitious would be an underestimate, because every song feels like an orchestra that simply puts its mouth to it. Even though the songs might not be that long, every piece of instrumentation makes sure that the huge suspense offered, doesn’t get lost in between structures. It feels like they’re connected and you can simply sit back and relax. The sound-scape itself is grandiose, but simply doesn’t want to leave any detail out of the mix, so whoever mixed this piece of interesting music should be proud. Gradually, you’re welcomed into the world of Torquem and it’s a pretty wonderland filled with experiences, extended periods of suspense, gratitude, sorrow and a sense of belonging. Thank you so much. Songs range from “Floehm” to “Elveleiet” and it was released on the 1st of March, by themselves – I guess. If you’d ever want a CD rather than the digital experience, you can mail them about it, over here.

2428207702-1Meet your maker, or meet your raver. Or something like that. Anyway, the group Brou de Noix are from France or Japan. I don’t really know which country. However, they’ve currently released an EP or something, titled “444“. If you combine the darker elements of industrial, the atmospheric guise of ambient and the concrete sound of old-school electronica, in the wake of dance or disco – is this what you get? I don’t really know. There’s so much going on when it comes to the genres, that it’s hard to categorize. But booming beats, hard industrial noises and cars driving past you is a common denominator. Well, if you’d put the word disco beside the word industrial and threw a party within the confinements of an abandoned warehouse, this is possibly what you could get. What’s clear about it is that it’s a totally new approach to what you’d think could be electronica. Everything is at its point and peak, the trashy sound-scape waltzes around, trying to get your attention. But it’s slow enough to not be a stirrer. I must agree that my brain is in total decay now that the stereotypical formula can’t be placed. You know that I’m not formulaic, but damn, this is hard to describe. Willingly, I’d bet every penny on it being one of the most experimentalist approaches in a while, worthy of that particular word, in comparison to everything that gets it slapped upon itself. Quickly, put on a gas mask and head for the elevator, we’re going to party in an abandoned warehouse – together with Brou de Noix and their post-disco-industrial-rave-music. The three tracks featured on this release are “Ashes“, “Compost” and “Where the wild things are“, it was released on the 3rd of March and is totally D.I.Y. for what I know.

3335825678-1Since I feel good today, I had to add a third band to this list. How about some alternative rock meets classic post-punk? Yeah, I know, I saw it in your eyes that you wanted it. This is another one of those bands that compare themselves with Joy Division, which is undoubtedly a little bit true. Most of the time I ain’t too keen on them, but this is an exception. They’re from the UK and have played in bands like The Xcerts, Bleech, Native and The After Party. Not that I know any of those bands, but that doesn’t matter anyway. They’ve currently released a single for their upcoming album titled “Patriot“. Something that gets me with their music, is their sense of nostalgia and how they can mix it perfectly in between shades of silence and a hurricane of riffs that face you directly. Only thing I wouldn’t be a fan of is the snaredrum sound, because it hits me off balance each and every time. Well, it’s saved by the wonderful ranges of British dialect. His sincere words cut through butter like a hot plastic knife. Or, yeah, it feels like someone is cutting an onion in front of your eyes. Very emotional, this release, with everything topped off. I guess the most important thing is how they arrange the instrumentation, how they fit in the different overpasses and how they do it with such precise vigor. Because it’s everything that you’d need to get an emotional reaction of this scale, because I recognize myself in some of the lyrics that they put out there too. Which is a great point for a band that I haven’t known anything about in the past few days. It feels like I’ve known them for ages, by now. The riffs, the drumming and the suspense when the singer and the back-up go out in a whirl is amazing in one way or another. The only track featured is “Patriot“, which was released recently and will be available for streaming on their bandcamp until the 18th of March, then it will be available for download together with the B-side titled “Lets Go Out“.

Recension: Superjam Presents: Upper Layer Cruisers – Rush Consequence

333Även en del utav Svart Städhjälp, men denna gången inom ett soloprojekt, är Martin Nilsson som kallar sig själv för Superjam Presents: Upper Layer Cruisers. Första låten på detta släpp är “Directions Through The Midnight Maze“, som påminner väldigt mycket om äldre TV-spelssoundtracks. Där ljudet på ett långsamt men säkert sätt letar sig fram mellan de olika vrår de kommit ifrån. Introt skulle mycket väl kunna simulera någon avlägsen djungelfärd in i djupaste Amazonas, där lekfylldheten hos synthpartierna letar sig in mellan tribalistiska trumslag och avslagna ljud. Retro är bara förnamnet när den minst sagt experimentella bakgrunden synar sin inte alltför avlägsna melodiska kusin. När man kommer längre in i ljudlandskapet så är manipulation A och O, då Martin på ett nästan hänsynslöst sätt utnyttjar sin potential till att vrida och förändra karaktären hos synthslingorna, på det mest bisarra vis hittills. Allting känns som om det kommer utmynna i något större, vilket det till en stor del gör, då en domedagssynth får för sig att komma in när man minst anar det.

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Review: White Blush – S/T

3645117286-1A newly conjured and dreamy landscape with dark pop. With the first song “True Luv” Carol Ryu expands the thoughtfulness of catchy pop-tunes, to be something more than just fluffy dreams and fantasies. This melancholic piece of coated pop is more than someone could handle, reminding me of a Ladytron mixed up with Crystal Castles with a pinch of Cocteau Twins. Her soft-spoken and gentle voice is a stark reminder of the contrast between the sound-scape and herself, putting it at a distance between them both and a cutting point only a needle could pinch through. Even though they’re remote, they’re close to each other. On the other hand, the dreaminess of the sound-scape and the sharp edges mildly resemble a nightmare with a light in the end of the tunnel. Not really an apocalyptic scenario, but by far something sinister. It might be a little bit minimalistic at heart, but it holds a greater width inside. Where the more ambient and dreamy pop surge throughout the body of the peculiar (yet not unreasonable) mixture.

Furthermore, the next song titled “Mirror” might just be the antithesis of the first song. Where the softer and more dreamy elements have been put in the foreground, with an electronic arpeggio running straight through it. The reverb used on Carol Ryu‘s voice also clings through the sound-scape with the percussion, which gives the listener a gloomy feeling, and a lush one too. Even though the voice might be a little bit too much beneath the surface and the instrumentation a bit louder, the general lyrical content is as fitting as ever. It feels as if it’s something you should try to decrypt, as if it leaves a message cut into pieces, for you to pluck together and make something out of. All the sublime elements of this song make it special and drive everything creative out, just to insert it in different parts of the song. Sometimes the more quirky synths can be a little too much, but everything else is on point. There’s a lot of things that are great about this songs and some that could be improved, like removing the weird “8-bit” synth in the garbage can, together with all its screeching.

Whilst the next song “Jolene” takes on a more ballad-oriented and genuine nostalgic pop-sound, the percussion is still doing its job. Definitely one of the strongest cards yet, as the melodies and the rhythms all entwine and create a bombastic yet dreamy sound-scape, almost bordering to ambient. The lushness of her voice is almost indescribable, but trying to describe it would be like opening your finest bottle of champagne and taking a sip from it. Then resting in your chair in front of an open fire. A luxurious endeavor not meant to be exposed for us less fortunate. But yet, inviting us in with a smile on the face and giving us high-quality art. As I’ve said in earlier reviews, there’s something about a girl’s name being the title of a song, it almost always turns out to be one of the stronger songs on those albums. Also, the mix of down-tempo and somewhat up-tempo electronica, makes for a wonderful mix that can keep rolling for all I care.

Every album also needs an intermission song, which “Wait” is a symptom of. Nothing bad with that, I enjoy a little bit of rest before punching the alarm clock and moving on. Here, it’s also noticeable how a strong yet lush voice can give a sound-scape that extra feeling of grandeur. It’s like an instrument in its own way, of course and if you a little bit of watery reverb on it, there’s something going to come out of it. The result is very much a lo-fi, down-tempo and angelic experience nobody should be without. Like sitting in an empty church by yourself, hearing the wonderful voice of someone who can hold it out long enough for it to be strong. Filling up the space with a lot of wonderfully interpretative motions in and of sound. The stripped down sound is minimalistic and enthralling enough to put it on once again, just to enjoy the wonderful sound of a singer’s voice that is on par with the sound itself.

But here, something changes. With the next song titled “808 Myst“, the chilling effects of a darkwave-oriented pop mystery unleashes its thorns. The sound is very much a confusing and bedazzling one, which keeps itself in your mind, yet reminds you awfully a lot of white noise. There’s something for everybody to fetch here. Sheer ambiance, scary darkwave or mysteriously harsh melancholy. Almost gaining a little bit more confidence to call itself dark ambient. At times, the swooping yet steady sound is crushing the inside of your skull, while releasing enough pressure to keep you listening to it. There’s always some pressure in this song, which quenches the thirst to hear it once more. Its notion is also radically different from anything I’ve heard on this album, which is a little bit confusing, but maybe not surprising. Because there’s certainly a darker vein to some of the songs, which just happened to escalate into something beyond the pop notion that it has been involved with throughout.

Which makes us delve into the last track on the album. It’s titled “Juice of My Heart” and contains the same elements as the aforementioned song. Instead of reminding me of some dark ambient mixed with crushing power electronics/darkwave, or something in that manner, it reminds me of some heartfelt movie soundtrack of the 80’s. The pulsating percussion, the lo-fi sounding elegance and the glamorous environment it revolves around. If someone would’ve told me anything about it, I would’ve picked a movie like Top Gun for it to be in. Even though it might not be as bombastic or in-your-face as Berlin’s song, it might actually have been featured in anyone of those movies if it had came out in those days. I think this album is great and also one of the reasons I wouldn’t shy away from the dream-pop genre. It’s got all the necessary things to keep it afloat, and it actually brings something more to the table than reverb-drenched nonsense being spewed out together with boring electronica. You should listen it through and make up your own mind, but I would like to recommend it.