Exclusive Premiere: Minuit Machine – Agoraphobia (Album Version)

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When everything had settled through the eyes and ears of Hélène De Thoury, she launched a duo together with Amandine Stioui – whose voice had been a wake-up call for Hélène – she adored it. Since 2013 they’ve been working together on shaping their first release, which took them a few months to put out. This self-released EP, called “Blue Moon“, quickly gained a lot of attention and appraisal from those who found out about them. Although their sound can be found somewhere in between the minimal synth and new-wave categories, their rather complex structure and beautifully laden vocals make them unique to genres fond of taking it literally when translating a fixed category into something more. There is a large hint of minimalism in their sound, but all the influences they gather together shape a uniqueness which takes them away from traps that quickly become clichés. With their new-wave sound, enchanting structures and pinpointed melodies – affect you in all the ways they might want you to feel. From the year 2013 to 2014, they’ve worked on their debut-album and now they’re soon ready to unleash it as a whole.

The french label Desire Records are releasing their debut-album “Live & Destroy” will be released on the 6th of October. Before the release, they’re playing live at the french venue La balle au bond, on the 1st of October. On the 30th of November they will go on a tour, hitting countries like Spain, France, Germany and Belgium. I exclusively premiered “Agoraphobia (Album Version)“, a track which is what I consider to be the beating heart of their record. This track is so emotional and delivers a whole other insight to what minimal synth can sound like, when transformed by other genres which overlap or have less to do with a genre like synth-pop. I think it is their strength and it sounds like they’ve worked hard on every single track. Let this be the anthem that will carry you away and put you into the mood for listening to “Live & Destroy”. Look out if you want to buy it, because soon it will be available from Desire Records. Stream the exclusive track down below.

Listen: Luminance / Acapulco City Hunters – The Cold Rush

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Belgium are steaming ahead of everyone else. Wool-E Tapes have been working hard at putting out new releases that catch one’s ear. The current ‘flagship’ could be considered to be Luminance – the electronic solo-project by David-Alexandre Parquier. In the month of July when his first 7¨-release “Obsession / Viper Smile” was released on Weyrd Son Records, he also did a split together with Acapulco City Hunters called “The Cold Rush” – which was their first release up to date. The Weyrd Son-release was more of a collaborative effort with him behind the machinery on both tracks, Felicie on backing vocals for “Viper Smile” and Nathalie Bruno on vocals for “Obsessions“. I am however not going to linger on that release but focus on the latest one. It is an interesting blend of house-music matched with a new-wave sound, whilst Luminance heads into a whole other direction than what can be found on his earlier releases. Sure, the minimalism is still there and his wittered electro comes into play with the general synth-pop minimalism that makes his sound so great. But I notice how he does not sway for the ambient reflections made in his first track on the release. I also believe that his tracks on this split are more in for a brutal sound coupled with more hopelessness, than his earlier releases. The notable darkwave influence does make itself reminded. The playful melodies mixed with a sound best described as when day turns into night. He’s nothing short of knowing how to make this concoction a danceable but seductive brew that is about as volatile as daggers into flesh – without the courage to strike when the day is lit.

When it comes to Acapulco City Hunters, their or his sound is not primarily darker because they’re on the other side of the fence – but notably well-thought out and considerate. A rhythm that is in constant motion together with an ominously sounding house-music sound. No you will not find anything remotely similar to Swedish House Mafia when it comes to this. Let the acidic sounds mix with the lead melodies and blend into a thoughtful motion that could only make you reflect. It is meditative in one sense and leads you into a nicely laden vocal palette that draws upon calmness – and then comes a tribal fusion together with a obtuse frame of melody which goes into a bridge which lets an almost The Smiths-influenced intonation by the vocalist when he goes up a notch, out for display. Even though both of these artists are closely knit-together, I believe that my favorite is Acapulco City Hunters. They deliver a strong first-timed collaborative effort by teaming up with Luminance. I like their lyrical content because they remind me of how bleak the world is and can be, with all the romanticism that shies away and comes forth when you least know it. Order this release from Wool E Tapes if you like what you’re hearing. You can stream it in whole down below.

Harvesting #14: Transistor Sphere / DRAMA! / Eoster

Without further ado, Harvesting returns with a smattering noise. It’s been about a year since you last saw something in regards to this. This time covering releases from artists that have self-released their albums, to artists whom are already on a label. Everything from Transistor Sphere, an angst-pop artist crossing into cold wave territory, to DRAMA! a Hungarian avant-garde minimal electronics outfit being released on KHK Tapes. To Eostre, whose debut-album will soon be put out in full by the label Soft Corridor Records. Three enigmatic artists with their own perks. Three artists that are going to be covered here in Harvesting number 14. The fourteenth edition of Harvesting, to date. Scroll down and read it all.

a1517745545_10With a total of fifteen songs, the artist Transistor Sphere moves and shape-shifts into whatever that pleases him for the moment. Electronica is moving swiftly from a rather calm intro, to an angst-pop assault. Clashing beats, hypnotic atmospheres and cherished dark rhythms make this moment such a bliss. A moment that can be endured, a moment that is packaged in between fifty minutes and a little bit more. Lurking transmitters wire you to this experience, that moves somewhere in between the minimalism of minimal electronics, to the fast-paced rhythms you’d otherwise hear in a breakbeat or drum’n’bass track. The album itself has a titled that describes the feeling you get when listening to it: “Disintegrated“.

Here’s where everything dissolves and at the same time it’s a trip into the utmost space of the soundscapes. It can change for a minute, a few seconds – or a little bit more – from the most beastly fast-paced running electronica – to the utmost minimalistic heresy. The melodious content of this album is not something you should underestimate. His eloquent touch with sincere electronics overshadow the whole darkness that is repetitive in the atmosphere of the tracks. It feels organic and it doesn’t feel soulless at all. Low-key beats bounce upon the samplings, the noises that can be heard are briefly swooshed away in favor for something else. Clearly a multifaceted release that goes in between ominous music, deliberate angst-pop with baselines as deep as the blue sea, to the cold wave and in touch with the emotional content at hand – to a degree that is probably not heard when listening to other artists. It’s also clear that he’s influenced by Friedrich Nietszche‘s philosophy to a degree, in regards to the quote on his page: “The future influences the present just as much as the past“. A mysterious artisan at his craft, an interesting antagonist at our hands. Listen to Transistor Sphere‘s album “Disintegrated” below.

khk03_The cacophony doesn’t stop here, as DRAMA! steps up to the plate and run amok. This is a Hungarian artist whose participation in music ranges back to a compilation this artist was featured on, which was “Central Heating” – a compilation crafted by the same label he’s on – namely KHK Tapes. It was released back in 2012 and even though this release, which is his first self-titled, was released in 2013 – we thought of featuring it anyway. He’s got a rather out-of-the-ordinary industrialized landscape of sound which is carefully crafted together between the boundaries of industrial and tape music in the first hand, and minimal electronics as the underlying motor that is pulling this workhorse forward. Forwarding public domain information from the United States in the shape of sound, mixed together with a regular rhythm make a rhythm out of the samplings that he’s borrowed from these domains. This results in a pretty weird but rather analogue experience that will drive you insane sooner or later. A lot of the tracks don’t even make it over three minutes, which makes them a lot shorter then what is expected. The release is compromised of thirteen tracks and the further in you go, the stranger it gets. Noise gets on top of the chain, whilst an almost power electronics sound is dominating throughout – resonating with the scrappy sound of the electronics. Once you go in there, you’ll come out with bad German soap operas that have been used for sampling purposes, but also dubbed things that you can’t really find the source for – unless you’re interested in that stuff. The whole ordeal you’ll have to endure when listening through it feels like a re-cycling of sound. All the primitiveness that can be heard is overlapped with interesting build-ups, heavy and noise synthesized sounds, charred beats that would make you suffer if you had to listen to it even longer. The format is well-thought out, since you can only endure it long enough until the repetitiveness kills you on its own. But mind you, it’s not boring to listen to, at least. You can listen to the whole self-titled release down below, from KHK Tapes bandcamp.

a2596681461_10Glad you’ve read this far. Lastly, we’ve got an experience for you that you’ll probably find rather enjoyable. Eostre is a solo-project that combines the ingeniousness of minimal electronics with the rather rugged sound of ambient and experimental electronics. A formula that the man behind the solo-project, the Belgian man Sébastien Schmit (K-Branding/Service Special) have made his own. Harnessing the monotone vocals that he puts out on the smooth surface of the tracks. A rather interesting paradox between the smoothness of the ambient in the tracks with the rather rugged beats that hit you hard in your neck. This is his debut-album under this moniker and it’s titled “They Were Made Of White Cloth“. Put out by the label Soft Corridor Records. What’s interesting with the two tracks made available on this release is how they change from being a rugged trip into the unknown, hitching a smooth ride – but ending with bubbling electronica and then simply fading out.

Just to change to rather ethnic beats with the other track made available, a kind of middle eastern and/or oriental touch with a sullen synthesizer that almost reminds you of that calm, but oriented emotional saxophone sound that gets played rather frequently in films from the 1980’s. Especially if these films are Action-films. It is clearly noticeable that the different instruments form an intricate rhythm together, that is being based upon underlying rhythms that soar through the dampened landscape of sound. Well, tough luck, because Sébastien is a drummer when push comes to shove. This is also noticeable in how he form the different patterns for the rhythms. Everything goes dancing throughout the soundscapes of these two tracks. Not much more can be uttered about this release, since all tracks have not been made available. It’s a joint release between Soft Corridor Records and Alt. Vinyl, and is going to be put out on the 20th of April. The cover illustration was created by Jess Pauwels, and the photography was taken (and designed) by Julien Lambrechts. Listen to and stream this release down below, from Soft Corridor Records bandcamp.

Listen: Luminance – Icons & Dead Fears

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The soulful and devotional second album “Icons & Dead Fears” was just released almost a week ago on Wool-E Tapes. Combining the atmosphere of ethereal ambient, with an overwhelming minimal synth presence, Luminance deliver what could be considered a mindful piece of electronic calm. The material on this release was recorded in between 2013 and 2014 in Brussels. There’s also a noticeable wavelength of dark-wave, together with some serious vocalization by David-Alexandre Parquier, the man behind this release. Hear the rhythm that will make you move, a rhythm that’ll make you out of breath from just moving around to this six-tracked album. Nocturnal melodies bounce back onto a more melodious and lighter note, as the whole structure of the pieces that he deliver will move further into electro territory. It’s something you must listen to if you’re even remotely into minimal synth. There are a lot of interesting complexities that overlap each other. Due to unforeseen circumstances, “Icons & Dead Fears” came out before the real debut-album by Luminance. The “real” debut was released by an American label called Young Cubs, and was titled “The Light Is Ours“.

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The Belgian label Wool-E Tapes showcase the variety that still comes out of Belgium. Having been created on Cassette Store Day in 2013, they’ve moved on from that and continue to put out releases. So this release is their latest release, and it is featured as both a digital release but it’s also out on cassette. The limited edition cassette comes in one-hundred copies and can be bought for seven euros. For those of you that appreciate skilfully done minimal synth with other influences involved, I’d say that this release is a must-have in your archives. You can listen to the whole release and stream it in full down below, so you can get a real taste of what’s being talked about. So do just that and have an enjoyable moment. Buy the cassette if you want the real deal. Both the debut-album “The Light Is Ours” and the second album “Icons & Dead Fears” can be streamed down below. So take your chance.

Watch: Little Trouble Kids – Haunted Hearts

If you’re hungering for some noise to your late-in-the-afternoon tea or coffee, look no further. As we dot the line in Belgium, a band called Little Trouble Kids e-mailed me about the fact that they’ve got a music-video out for their latest single “Haunted Hearts“. I haven’t actually heard of them until this popped up in my browser. Interestingly enough, they’ve got a nice approach to both pop-music and noise as such, together with their “grandiose minimalism“. Grandiose I say, because their percussion-focused track “Haunted Hearts” deliver a somewhat minimalistic sound, in one aspect at least – and that is the semi-acoustic atmosphere and the vocals. Resonating throughout the sound-scape is a new form, but albeit old form, of avant-garde expression. However, what makes their song interesting as such, as I haven’t heard anything from them but this song – is the fact that the percussion takes a leading role. But also the fact that their landscape of sound is shaped around the fragmenting parts that make it feel so completed. This, together with the different elements of both a female vocalist and a male vocalist. This is also where the appropriate tagline for them appear, namely: alternative. Little Trouble Kids is Eline Adam and Thomas Werbrouck.

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Watch their haunting and mystical music-video up above and download their first single “Haunted Hearts“, taken from their forthcoming album with the same name, for free from their website. The album itself will be released on the 17th of March, so I’d tell you to look out for whenever it comes out, because they’ve got a pretty interesting sound. For those of you that are interested in their discography I’d suggest that you’d check out their second album “Adventureland“, released on Little Trouble Disks in 2012, and their debut-album “Little Trouble Kids“. Both can be streamed and listened to down below. Their new track “Haunted Hearts” can be downloaded for free from here.

Exclusive Stream: This Morn’ Omina – Obeah

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These interesting figures within tribal electronics, industrial, ritual techno and everywhere in between, are making a minor come back with the album “Nagash“. Karolus Lerocq and Mika Goedrijk have been at it since 1997, in various constellations, when their first album “Decline And Fall Of Empires” was released on the label Afterfucht. Together with the sub-label of Enfant Terrible, namely; Gooiland Elektro, Invisible Guy will be transcending the realm of reality in favor for a more suggestive environment. This is simply not for the weak of mind, since the galloping hordes of beat tear into the tribal instincts of man. Some of it seems to be a tad psychedelic, when the heavy beats land their blow on your ears. Well, as it have been said, you now know what you’re getting into. This is Gooiland Elektro 011 and Enfant Terrible 029. In this collaboration, we give you the B2 track, which is the last track on this particular release, for you to listen to. It’s titled “Obeah” and you can stream it in full down below. It will be out in mid October, so if you’d like to order it whenever it shows up, you should go to Enfant Terrible.

Exclusive Stream: NSRB-11 – Consumer Programming

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We bring you the best, so fuck the rest. No, that’s not how my melody goes. This is just a provocation to fill out a sentence. We’re blessed to be bringing you yet another exclusive stream of a track, all thanks to Saša Rajković of Sensorium/Zarkoff. If you’ve heard of Gerard Donald, Sherard Ingram and Lana Jastrevski – you probably know where this is going. Their nicknames are otherwise spelled out as Heinrich Mueller, DJ Stingray and Popsimonova. Which isn’t really everything they’ve ever done, but probably what you know them as. Heinrich Mueller is the nickname of Gerard Donald, who also sport different sounds under the nicknames of Dopplereffekt, Drexciya (together with Sherard Ingram) and Arpanet – to name a few. Sherard Ingram is probably most known as DJ Stingray, but he’s also known by the names of Mystic Tribe A.I. and Urban Tribe. Lana Jastrevski is most known for her outlandish pseudonym Popsimonova, but also for being the founding member of the DAF-influenced group called Dekolaž. Anyway, you probably know that the Belgian label WeMe Records are going to release a double-LP with NSRB-11 on the menu, titled “Commodified“, on the 9th of September. Those of you that are fans of Heinrich Mueller since before, should recognize the swift arms of Detroit Electro, and see it as a continuation of his project.

What’s new is that Lana Jastrevski’s wonderful voice will be heard on several tracks, on this release. Therefore, I’ve gotten the honor to exclusively stream the full track “Consumer Programming” for you. Hard-hitting and uncompromising high-tech electro, with a detachment from the reality we know it as. In the future there’ll be no humans, so you better tune in and listen to this robotic sound-scape that will make you enter 2045. Perhaps even further into the simulation, that will be our future. Stream the whole track exclusively down below, check out more of the album over here. You can also pre-order it, as CD or 2LP.

Some questions for Michael Thiel from Weyrd Son Records!

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Michael Thiel is the son of the man that was Snowy Red, whose name was Marcel Thiel. With the first release coming out from his newly started label, Weyrd Son Records, which was a tribute to Snowy Red by a multitude of synth-artists – his label became a part of what might be a future legacy. This son of Belgium is the sole proprietor of the label, and he makes everything work. Since he shaped the idea for the label back in 2012, it started to become a real label when the compilation “_ever Alive – a tribute to Snowy Red” was released in May, 2013. Which had the catalog-number WyS-001. I’m all about this label, so I sent Michael some questions about it, hinting on future releases, the symbolic nature of the first compilation, the artists featured on his label – and much more. Tune in for another questionnaire, that is simply too great to be overlooked. At least if you ask me, but I hope you’ll enjoy reading it.

Your label is pretty new, since it’s only been around since the late December of 2012, from what I’ve noticed. The first release, the tribute to Snowy Red, seems to have been a huge success. What was it like in the process of starting your label?

– Indeed. I officially announced the creation of Weyrd Son Records around late December 2012. A full tribute album to Snowy Red already crossed into my mind a while ago, but it was in the morning of a day in April that I clearly stated; that from that day on, I would work seriously on that first release. I had a few band names in mind, but for some reason I thought it would be quite hard to find a record label that might be interested to release a records with so many “new bands”. I didn’t want anyone to impose any bands or artists I wouldn’t work with, so I immediately thought I would do everything by myself and create my own brand to have a full control of that project.

How hard was it to gather all these artists for this huge compilation?

– I would be lying to say it was a piece of cake doing this. The most difficult part was to be sure I would receive all the tracks on time, which didn’t happen. It takes a lot of energy to give everyone the same motivation that you have yourself. They were of course motivated, but as long as the project is not 100% theirs, you can’t really expect for them to be involved in it – as much as you are. I mean, from that morning of April 2012, I decided to dedicate the biggest part of my time to everything related to the compilation. All those great artists have their own life, their own music and duty, it’s a normal thing – that they would put me on hold for some days. Plus, I didn’t want to push them too much, because I wanted them to take the time they would need to do what they do, in the best of ways. I guess I was just too confident about the deadline. Now I know what it’s like, for the forthcoming releases.

I’m just guessing that you are the brother of Marcel Thiel, so it seems pretty obvious why a tribute to Snowy Red was the first release. Was this a symbolic act for you in honor of his memory?

– Micky Mike was my dad.

It’s true, I didn’t want anything else to come out first on the label. It was at first pretty symbolic, indeed. I had already experienced such a workload three years ago when I was in charge with the art direction of the 5 LP boxset of Snowy Red that got released on Onderstroom. I insisted to do the artwork, and write the text for the whole booklet, so what I did was to get in touch with everyone who was close to my dad and worked with him; photographers, musicians, make-up artists, film makers, sound engineers, friends, etc. I then started to interview them all and my whole work was based on what I’ve learned about him. It was my way to get closer to my dad and to his music, I guess. I was only 4 when the first Snowy Red record came out. Of course I knew all the records by heart already, but I needed to have another approach towards the music and the artist himself. I used to listen to the whole discography while working on the designs and texts. It was pretty inspiring and I did exactly the same thing this time, with the tribute album. Every time I discovered a new facet of Snowy Red, and even more now when other people are playing it.

You’ve got a lot of artists featured on your “roster”, which is pretty weird since the label is very new. Since you aim on giving them total artistic freedom, would that be why they’ve joined up with Weyrd Son Records?

– I can’t really speak for them, but it’s true that I to give the artists 100% control of what they work on for Weyrd Son Records. I really think giving everyone the space they need is the best way to get great things in return. I would never tell anyone “hey, you should sound more like this or that”, or: “that voice part should better be done this way instead”. Who am I to pretend that I know better than themselves, in what their true musical personality is?

Are you the only guy working with the label, and how much time does it consume from your everyday life?

– I’m officially the only person involved, as I’m the only one making the decisions in the end. But there are a few people around me like friends, my sister and my girlfriend, who are giving their opinion – or simply giving me advice. But there’s always one person that is constantly around that I speak a lot with. I would say that it helps me to understand what people are waiting for, what kind of things they would expect from a label. I don’t really buy everything he’s saying, but at least it’s really interesting to hear someone else’s point of view.

Since you’ve already revealed what you’re going to release on your label, both for me and Radio Campus, I was wondering if there’s something you’d like to cover about these releases that haven’t already been said?

– So far, I haven’t really been talking about the fifth release, which I know is some kind of event. It’s about a fresh new band out of the LA-scene. Their name is High-Functioning Flesh, consisting of the duo Susan Subtract (Branes), and Gregory Fronczak. They released a four-tracked tape four months ago and the whole synth-scene in LA went into a mini-blast. I immediately fell in love with them, and I’m counting them in amongst my future projects, which is truly my biggest pride.

Have there been any other labels that you’ve taken influence from, when you decided to start up your label?

– I guess that every single label that has a true and strong personality has or had an influence on me. They are most of the time pretty different, musically speaking, to what I tend to work on – but things like visual communication or artistic coherence are always good lessons to get influenced by. Sometimes I listen to every single artist or record that the label is showing to the world. My interest for a label is sometimes as strong as for music itself. To speak more about the ones that impacted me greatly, I would say that the following three, were those responsible of influencing me: Ideologic Organ (a sublabel of Mego), Sacred Bones Records and Sige. I truly love their artists, but I’d say that it’s pretty far from what I’m working with, musically. But I admire how coherent they are, and the quality of their products, design and inventiveness.

What kind of artists and bands have gotten in contact with you, besides those that are already confirmed?

– Actually, Marburg, the Polish band that is on the tribute to Snowy Red, have gotten in contact with me. There have been a few, mostly doing synth music, of course. But the one I got the biggest interest for was a band doing some true rock’n’roll music. It kinda reminded me of POP 1280, which I ‘m quite a big fan of. I hope I won’t sound like an asshole, but I don’t really like the exercise of being contacted by bands. The reason is that most of the time people aren’t really fitting my vision of what I want to work on. But if I like their stuff, I’m always ready to help.

As a celebratory gesture, you also released the mixtape “The Weyrd Dig Nasty” – celebrating the release of your label. Did it live up to your objective of the label?

– That mixtape was a way for me to put something out that was related to the label, with almost all the artists involved in the tribute, being featured on it. I wanted to give an overview of what Weyrd Son Records was all about, at least for the next few months of action.

When thinking about the label itself, how much response have you gotten from people since the start?

– I got lots of great response so far. Both from the artists I’m working with and people who have heard about Weyrd Son Records, that purchased the first release. Those great comments are making me thinking this was definitely the right move, and certainly the best thing I’ve ever started.

If you got to pick for yourself, what kind of artists or bands would you like to have on your label as a complement?

– Oh, wow. There are so many. There are awesome new bands that I really love, like BOAN, Ssleeperhold and Keluar..They’re all releasing their first record this year on great labels. But if I had to pick some names among confirmed artists, I would say Mushy, Lebanon Hanover and Scorpion Violente. Also, if we were to speak of other music that can’t be fitted into what kind of genres I deal with, I’d say that Chelsea Wolfe, who’s become my biggest musical crush since a decade ago. Or, if we move in the periphery, Eyvind Kang, if we’re going to speak of someone who blew my mind for the last two years.

Since your label is an independent one, are you going to expand in any direction or keep it smaller?

– I’m really not thinking about the possibility to expand. Plus, I think that it would be a mistake. I don’t want to loose a dimension that works, which makes me so happy right now. What I like here is that I have a privileged relationship with everyone, and with the bands. I also try to have a great contact with the customers by replying to every single request or remark. It takes time, but it gives me a really strong feeling to read that someone’s happy, from having a nice reply in the mail. I guess that only I will do for now. As long as I can do everything by myself, I will.

When you package things, they seem luxurious. Do you devote a lot of time to make it unique?

– I don’t think they’re so luxurious right now. But I guess what you could say is that I want them to be more and more luxurious. I’d like to make even more beautiful packages. But that takes so much time, because mostly I have to ship forty copies in a day.

The general aesthetics of Weyrd Son Records seem to be somewhat  industrially influenced, but also minimalistic. Where do you seek your inspiration for that?

– Graphic design is one of my biggest passions. I studied fine arts at school and I used to be really inspired by ancient Japanese art and paintings. Mostly because they use space and “visual silence” as a dialogue with forms and colors. The purity of a line, and of a shape is important to me, as they’re much like a signature. It’s also true that there’s something “industrial” about it, like the logo I created, and the colors I use. I want it to be something in between old fashioned and contemporary – but always classy.

Alright, it’s time to wrap up. What’s going to happen in the coming months?

– The next six months will be pretty busy, filled with lots of surprises. I just sent the artwork and mastering for the second release to the pressing plant, which is the Mushy/Meddicine split EP. It is a re-release on vinyl of the split tape that got released a year ago on Meddicine’s own label Sixsixsixties Records. Then there will be another reissue that will see the light of day around September. Which is the Linea Aspera 3-tracked EP. They released the amazing tape “II” right before they split up. It got sold out almost immediately and I was so pissed off that I missed it. The artwork of that one will be pretty special, but I won’t say too much about it now. The fourth release, that will actually have the catalog number WyS-003 is a three-EP boxset of White Horse. It’s the solo project of Ben Chisholm, who’s a full time member of Chelsea Wolfe’s band. He recently changed the name of White Horse into Revelator, but since he created all that music under the name of White Horse, we both agreed it was better to keep it under that name. This masterpiece in three volumes is titled “The Revenant Gospels”. Haunting and haunted.

I’ve know this music for two years now. I’ve been waiting for someone to release it, and for me to have the chance to hold a copy of it in my hands. But for some reasons that puzzles me, regarding the so outstanding quality of it, it never happened. But I’m ultimately happy that no-one did, because I’m so proud being part of this. And the fifth release will be a six-tracked EP from High-Functioning Flesh. The band that I was talking about earlier.

Listen to the tribute compilation for Snowy Red, that was released by Weyrd Son Records some time ago, down below.

Spotlight: Various Artists – _ever Alive – a tribute to Snowy Red

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I just thought I had to push for this compilation, because it’s awesome. A truly great one, which is a tribute to Snowy Red, which was the moniker for Marciel Thiel. One of the more influential artists within the minimal synth genre. This release feature a lot of the up and coming people, mainly from America, whom have contributed a whole lot to their own scene. But there are also a lot of artists from other parts of the world. The following are represented: Bestial Mouths, //TENSE//, Strange Powers, Mushy, Violet Tremors, Mirror Mirror, Meddicine, Nové Můra, Jessy Champagne, Revelator, Freddy Ruppert, Animal Bodies, Newclear Waves, Safyée, Led Er Est, Bright Future, Marburg and Deathday. So, it’s jam-packed with the best of the best, covering songs from albums like “Snowy Red“, “The Right To Die“, “Vision” and “The Beat Is Over“. Meaning; virtually every album he ever released. It’s inspiring to hear such a flawless re-interpretation of those legendary songs. All from different areas of the minimal synth sound. This is surely an investment, as you get a gatefolded double-LP, 180 gram, with hand-numbered packages limited to 500. You’ll can get this for twenty-two euros, and you really should, because it’s a great release. It’s also the first release on Weyrd Son Records (WyS-001), but surely not the last. Artwork was made by Betsy VanLangen.

Review: Vandal X – God Knows

77075_10151176287253883_2050433331_nVehemently outrageous hardcore, mixed with noise, rock’n’roll, psychedelia – and have some tendencies to drone. Compromised by a duo that could’ve been a whole orchestra, for all that you folks care. Günther Liket and Bart Timmermans are tiling up the world throughout a maniacally combination of wickedness. The first track which is also the title-track, “God Knows“, is a rattling piece of noisiness. Focusing on the wide sphere of combining spontaneous, no-wave-ish vocals with the stop-and-go technique of a rather monotonous but rhythmic arsenal of guitars, baselines, figurative drums – with spontaneous outbursts of playful and angered vocals. Nothing is holy when their vile notion of virtual reality is colliding with the place that we call Earth. This formula seems virtually unchanged at a first glance, within the next song “How Sick Is That“, but changes rapidly the more you get into it. Here’s more of the noisy and uncontrollable rock’n’roll you’ve always wished you could master. With atonal messages, spoken with worthiness – Vandal X are the true vandals of the confined space. Getting claustrophobia is easy, as you’re pushed to the edge of a tiny room.

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