Listen: DECADES / FAILURES, BURA BURA, Soft Riot

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Though the cover is too macabre for our taste, as the once beautiful woman have been thoroughly manipulated into looking as a piece of modern art – which in itself is very distasteful – DECADES / FAILURES musical aspect trumps everything else. As written in the description for the release, this piece of music was mastered in all haste, only using meager methods of recording – such as a blown speaker – all-in-all it adds more then it takes away from the music.

A bed-ridden and sickly vibe transformed into brazen post-punk, with an atmosphere of chords that are simply otherworldly together with the heavily distorted vocals. There’s a hopelessness that can be found in the lyrics and the general mood of each song, especially “Song 5” – but as a closing song it manages to ooze with hope, a light shining through in our darkest moments. Had this been mastered a bit more, or maybe been recorded in a different setting – it quickly would’ve lost its inner message and tone.

Listen to the release in full down below, buy it digitally to support the artist, so this can hopefully be made into a cassette.

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Uncompromising body-music turned into a mish-mash of new beat industrial greatness, Australian outfit BURA BURA manages to catch a depth which is overlooked within electronic body music, as his heavily transformed vocals bounce against the complex percussion in each song. A lot of the songs would fit better in a cinematic setting, but some of them are outright ridiculously great to listen to in some parts, especially “Flex Like Rex“.

Ironically enough, what he manages to pull off best is the neo-noir vibe of post-punk lewdness and electronic body madness – not so much with the more electro and industrial-influenced tracks – a catastrophic mess of blends and meshes that need to be more thoroughly tested for the forthcoming releases. The passages of swirling ambient that takes you into new heights of your own consciousness is frightening at first, but when the beats whirl around your head and you go further down the tunnel, there’s nothing anyone can do to stop it.

The release is available both digitally, and on cassette via Moontown Records. If you’re into it, you can also purchase one of the totebags specifically made for this release. Just follow the link through bandcamp down below.

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Soft Riot have long been one of our favorite artists, as he dabbles with the most comedic aspects of synth-pop music – but manages to keep a straight face through everything – delivering complex and atmospheric synthesizer music – especially in this new release, “The Outsider In The Mirror“. When it comes to the lyrics of some of these songs, he reveals how much talent it takes to create such imaginative lyrical content – whilst keeping the music in tune with everything he utters. It might not be the prettiest voice in the world, but there’s a sinister tone in his voice, there’s a sincerity being delivered with every word.

Waiting For Something Terrible To Happen” is a spastic ambush, a ticking clock of weirdness and anticipation, delivering catchy arpeggios and creative outbursts of heavy, deep electronic vibes. Even though it might not be some of this best releases of all time, it is a more cheerful and less moody vibe to this, a sense of belonging is shown between the lines of tongue-in-cheek lyrical brazenness. We’re eager to hear more of this, even though he’s heading in a very experimental yet freakishly pop-oriented direction.

The release is available for purchase via Possession Records, digitally, on CD, vinyl and cassette. You can purchase it below by following the bandcamp-link, or simply stream until you make your mind up.

Reviews: Multiple Man – New Metal, V/A – Strategies Against The Body Vol. 2

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Here comes a double track-by-track review of the newest releases, courtesy of DKA Records, based out of Atlanta, Georgia. Their discography includes: Boy Harsher, Dylan Ettinger / Goldendust, Profligate, Fit Of Body, Warning Light, Voice Of Saturn / Anticipation, High-Functioning Flesh, Valis, TWINS and Women’s Work.

As of the 2nd of March they’ve added two new releases to this immense discography – the debut full-length LP-release by Brisbane’s twin-brother-duo Sean and Chris Campion, otherwise known as Multiple Man, the release goes by the name of “New Metal“. Strategies Against The Bodies have now been introduced as a second volume, featuring even more artists then the first compilation. In this article I dissect each song of both releases and tell you my opinion on them. The release was mixed by Matt Weiner (CGI Records) and mastered by Dietrich Schoenemann.

Starting off with “New Metal“, having listened through their other discography, including favorites of mine from Detonic Records – the “Guilt Culture/Boiling Down” double-single – it is fair to say that when introducing this new full-length they’ve grown a bit in my eyes considering the sound itself and the general aesthetics which are pleasing for the eyes as the cover itself (created by James Stuart) reminds one about earlier industrial-releases in terms of appearance. You get a sinister and chaotic feeling in terms of the colors when they mix together, outlining the appearance of a seemingly distraught and/or desperate man. The font is also alluring and you basically get it right if you think the release has anything to do with body music or industrial music.

As the first song “Slow Code” is rung in by the scraping of metal, a violently underlying basedrum is introduced and on top of that a steady rocking beat – which together with other percussive elements mixed together – suddenly jumpstarts an electronic body music rhythm. It’s a pleasing synthesizer which develops into a harsher, more industrial-like anthemic kind of song, as outdrawn baselines and the overlying synthesizers make the rhythm multi-faceted – together with murmured vocals that add to the sinister feeling you get whilst listening to it. It is a somewhat catchy song that draws in a self-assuring vibe in terms of how bombastic everything gets after a while.

Even though it is repetetive in some parts, the soundscape itself morphs into something completely different the longer in it progresses. The chorus brings everything together into the theme of the whole song and what it is supposed to be and convey. It is a cold endeavour but at the same time it is not stripped of any emotions, as there is a whole palette of different feelings that you feel when listening to it. I feel alert, concentrated and inspired, on the edge tuning in.

If the first song was portrayed as anthemic, wait until you hear “Power Fantasy” – which starts with an off-putting “yoo-hoo“, to be smashed into your consciousness by one of the most perfect rhythms I’ve heard in this wave of new-body music. Everything about this song relies on the first synthesizer-rhythm and the percussive elements that are introduced. To add to the general heftiness of the song itself, the vocals together with additional basedrums create an enjoyable repetetive atmosphere which later on looms into a more atmospheric concentration of industrialized sound.

The sudden shrieking of the vocalist reapplies the stripped soundscape and reuses it to their heart’s content. Even after only having listened to the first two songs, one must say that this one – “Power Fantasy” – is something really special. Whether it is the retro industrial feeling that weighs in when all the beats collide, or if it is their special brand of it, is hard to say. But damn it is a really catchy song and even though the lyrical content might be unintelligible at times – the simpleness of it adds into the harsh emotional deliverance – which they manage to do perfectly. It is a jaw-droppingly good song, once you’ve listened through it way too many times.

Now with the next and third song on this release, it is less concentrated to harsh rhythms and electronic body music and more pure electronica with minimal synth weaved into it – I am, of course, talking about “Luxury Boys“. There’s a certain primitive vibe to the song even though the synthesizers, baselines and beats together concoct a swaying and interesting blend of these different forms of electronica. It feels dated, like something out of a time-machine, yet remarkably attached to the modern world as such. However, it would fit great in an alternative movie from the 1980’s.

At times the atmosphere feels like something exotic, especially when you hear the percussion and the main synthesizer which steadfastly creates a memorable thematic, which you end up portraying in your head. It is audio-visually a really great song, however I’m more impressed by the harsher side of Multiple Man. Though they’ve managed to, in their song, convey a more laidback alter ego – musically.

Skin” – their fourth song – has that same kind of feeling attached to it like the previous song. It seems like they’ve changed the general theme of their songs, as it progresses from the first and second, to the third and the fourth. It develops lyrically as well and becomes some kind of acid electronic bastard child of industrial music. When the synthesizer revs up to show its true acid colors – one is intrigued by it since it adds a whole different characteristic to the song itself – alongside the vocals that are unenthusiastically chanted and feel like they’re just being dragged along for the ride.

It is probably one of the songs up until now that have the best vocals in them. It adds so much more to the experience of listening to the song as well as the development of the soundscape as it accompanies the different influences and rhythms perfectly together. Though it might be added that the song in itself is impressive in many ways, it fails to attract any further emotions when listening to it, as it is only brought out when everything is brought together in an almost cataclysmic fashion.

Returning to the pure electronic body music with the fifth song “Negative Space” – an ominously sounding piece. A continously pounding rhythm attached to a gloomy atmosphere, feeling more like an intermission then anything else. One can’t help but feel left to the metaphorical clock ticking in the form of outdrawn synth-stabs. Somehow the electronic body music elements are of not the same importance as the more atmospheric aspects of this song. The continuity is what defines it all. It just keeps going.

Maybe this might be the dividing line that will shift the musical focus to something else or it may just be a filler for the filler’s sake. Usually, artists and bands have one of these kinds of tracks in their repertoir, in the case of Multiple Man – this song stands out from their others and in a positive manner as well. Reminding oneself about the shifting character of their sound and what they might be able to accomplish, and want to accomplish with their music.

Hotter Then Hell” is the sixth song on this neverending ride of different, excitingly fresh electronic body music with industrial vibes. This song is probably the most sublime of the bunch so far, it has got a really ambiguous vibe to it. One negative thing about it is that it is also the most boring song in terms of the soundscape, as there’s not much happening and it is not as upbeat as the other tracks. Nothing wrong with a downbeat track but this one doesn’t really cut it for me.

Ideal Self” is where it is at. It’s been tried with the other songs but it has got a funkier vibe then the other ones. The atmosphere is really wicked and the rhythm goes up and down like a jojo, embracing the more danceable elements and turning it around for them now later on in this release. It is really all about combining the more unusual genres and turning it into the new face of the Multiple Man that makes it or breaks it in terms of this song. Groovy is what characterize this musical experience the best.

Interestingly enough, as the song fades out and turns into “New Metal” – they’ve decided to put this title-track last on the record. Really a perfect summarization of what they have achieved during this eight-track long release. Even though it lacks everything that made the first few songs great it combines everything one’s heard so far into a mixture of the weirdness and the high energy electronic body music into an acid and industrial rollercoaster which holds up in the end.

I say that only because the rhythms are on point and this song is basically what you should’ve listened to first if you wanted a summary. My thoughts about this full-length debut-LP on DKA Records is that it brings something odd to the table and spins things around completely out of your own safe-zone. You must have taken a liking for electronic body music transgressing into all kinds of different music genres, plus the experimental edge in which Multiple Man hold their territory firm. Although some of the songs are a disappointment, not all of them need to be as good as “Power Fantasy” to hold up in the end. The more you listen to it, the more you enjoy the self-willed nature of this duo.

Tomorrow this article will be updated with a track-by-track review of Strategies Against The Body Volume 2. You can stream Multiple Man’s release “New Metal” down below and make up your own mind about it, but from what I’ve heard throughout the songs – they’ve surely got potential that enrich the DKA Records discography further.

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A follow-up to the 2015 compilation “Strategies Against The Body – Volume 1” have been released via DKA Records. Featuring a whole different roster of artists, containing various electronic genres, all derived from the so-called underground. Some of them more established then others. The cover for the release is very aesthetically unpleasant to lay one’s eyes on but is a reflection of what you can anticipate when listening through this compilation of artists.

Pyramid Club is the first artist and one must say that they’ve got a whole lot better songs then this one. It’s a freakishly monotonous song that doesn’t really cut it. One doesn’t really feel anything when listening to their song “It’s All Grey” – the atmosphere that is there is off-putting and doesn’t do them justice in terms of their discography, otherwise. What saves this song is the latter part of it beyond three minutes in, when the vocals go into a howling frenzy and the basedrum lunge at you as if it had gone berserk.

I really want to like this song but can’t really fathom it. Melodically it is odious and it doesn’t even give the tag ‘experimental‘ body music any revitalization. Repetetiveness and experimentalism can give you a whole other insight into what electronic music ultimately could be about – but here they just fall flat with their brand of it. Very unfortunate for anyone who’s fond of Pyramid Club’s current discography of demo-tracks with lots of potential.

Now on to Passing, who’s song “Sacrifice” starts off rather intriguingly with that bass-filled melodious atmosphere which bounce around in infinity together with acid influences as rambunctious electronica pushed to its limits. Then, suddenly, the vocals are introduced into the mix and one is instantly taken out of the mesmerizing sound – because they lack the punch and the guts which the rest of the soundscape perfectly molds into – overtime. It adds absolutely nothing that progresses the atmosphere even remotely. It would even be better if it was wholly instrumental instead, unfortunately.

All-in-all, the song itself has one hooked to the beats, rhythm and melodious extravagance. There’s a sense of emergency in the overall expression it gives, the fast-paced lunging, acidic body music with electronic overtones – masterfully executed, instrumentally at least. It’s got the perfect length as well and you can never get enough of the simple melodies that together make something out of nothing, adding complexity together with the percussion.

What never tires me is the special kind of desperate brand of electronic body music that Celldöd creates. He can make something out of nothing, it sounds huge no matter what he attaches himself to and the atmospheric feel of “Hemliga Rum” is made alarmingly brutal with his vocals alone. A hiss here and a hiss there, a steady acid rhythm with a baseline that seems to get harder the further into the song you get – the echoes of the vocals, making one uneasy listening to the song – all that is there, in the vast nothingness that he portrays – follow him into the secret room.

Imagining that it would be some kind of abandoned house or industrial setting, together with the lyrics in Swedish repeatedly saying “Take me with you, I want to see what you see, into secret rooms“, as if he is desperately clinging on to something – the deliverance is absolutely on point and adds much as the snaredrum hit is industrially enhanced by sounding like he’s hitting on a metal object – which in reality, maybe he is. It adds that extra portion of the atmosphere which would otherwise be lacking. In the end a very good song which leaves nothing to imagine, audiovisually he puts images in ones head.

Continuing in basically the same manner as the other songs, a kind of acid-inspired baseline together with melodic noises, Spatial Relation‘s song “Infinitely Wary” is now playing. I don’t really know what to say about Lissette Schoenly’s vocals – but it fits very well into the atmosphere created by the synthesizers and percussive elements – though it really does nothing for me while listening to it. I feel no emotions, it just feels like one has to get through it to get on with listening to the rest of the compilation. This brand of electronica hasn’t really gotten me interested, which is a shame, since they repeat what Pyramid Club did with their introductory song to this whole compilation.

When one has listened through the song a few more times, one finds it to be somewhat alluring – though it can’t be explained, really. There’s something avant-garde about the approach to the whole song and how they utilize the different elements of it, how it gradually progresses and how it finishes. There’s a little redemption in the form of the atmosphere as it grabs onto you in a weird way, the electro-vibe and all, which is odd to say the least but hey.

One of my favorite projects since “The Red Dress – Parts I/II“, James Andrew’s own Tifaret, is featured on this compilation as the fifth track in a total of ten. The song “Lara” interesingly enough sounds like “Keep On Driving” (one of his other songs) – the difference is if Andrew Eldritch had a son, James Andrew would be his. Their vocals are really alike and one feels like he’s drawn a little bit too much inspiration in his song-making from The Sisters Of Mercy’s front-man. It is, however, not pastiche – the atmosphere is nice and the beats are on point.

Melodically it must’ve drawn influence from his earlier song but it doesn’t really matter. This is one of the better songs I’ve heard on this compilation up until now. Hopefully this is the one that turns it around and introduces one to some equally as great songs. It should be released simultaneously as this song, as it feels like a variant and lies really close in the whole soundscape and if it weren’t for the different melodies, more emotional vocals, it would almost be identical.

Suddenly, awestricken, in a good way. Anticipation flies into your ears with that subliminal, brooding electronic body music that has a groove like no other – talking of course about the song “Photograph” – which together with samples and a rhythm out of this world is gradually making one reconsider what one’s written about the compilation in general. Now we’re talking about some serious electronic music, whose atmosphere makes one dance along to it and is catchy as no other song – currently on this compilation.

One does not mind the repetetiveness of the beats as it slowly develops over time, introducing small but noticeable changes in character which enhances the whole experience of listening to it. The continually pounding sub-baseline pushes the beats further into the forefront of the mix – and there’s never a dull moment listening to this song. Thankfully, maybe there’s still hope for the compilation in large as we proceed.

SinceGhoul” was released in 2016, Videograve have been out of the loop. Now they’re back, on this compilation. The melodies in their song “Dead Men Floating” are equally as sinister as the title of it. They’ve let the melodies be at the forefront of the atmosphere and the beats plus percussion in the back, giving off a resounding and reverberated no-nonsense sound. Videograve are one of the more interesting acts that have emerged the last few years when it comes to electronic music. They have an authentic and goddamn awesome sound. Electronic body music gone haywire, electronic body music developed from a general minimal electronics waypath – never straying away from originality.

This is my favorite song so far on this compilation. I’m very impressed in general. There’s nothing to complain about, it is a really enjoyable song to listen to and there are so many facets of it that you’ve stopped counting. They really portray a sinister picture – a rather picturesque one if one may say so – audio-visually aesthetically pleasing, if that makes any sense at all.

Now for something a lot different. Collin Gorman Weiland’s song “Indenture and Stone” – monotonous industrial techno, with minimal wave influences. A very bleak song in terms of the atmosphere, very heavy when it comes to the industrial side of it and something that brings forth a whole different sound on this compilation. It is noticeable that the end is near whilst listening to it, the very apathetic vocals and the grinding percussion that seem to have no end to it. Draining energy from every outlet where there’s even sound.

There’s an anti-upbeatness to the song, it is downtempo but tries hard to be upbeat. Looming on as if nothing ever mattered, ending rather beautifully and very unexpectedly – turning into an ambient piece that gives one inner peace while listening to it. A welcoming addition to an otherwise interesting and never-ending seance. Had the latter parts of the song been developed even further, there might’ve been a nice blend of ambient industrial and the harshness of the song itself.

Ninth song on the compilation is by ARIISK and is titled “Candid Machine” – which is one of those songs that never develop into anything. It would’ve been better if it had some progression worth to mention. All this experimental electronic body music is making one’s head spin. There’s nothing about the monotonous approach in rhythm that gives anything, it just feels like a piece that is stuck in the same rhythm and melody without ever ending or transforming into anything good.

There’s a continuous lack in the atmosphere itself that isn’t repaired by the beats nor the progression of the song itself. Not to mention the vocals – it doesn’t add or bring anything out of the atmosphere. Even though this song might be meant to sound dark and provoke some kind of emotion, there isn’t any. It feels like one wants to skip the song and head onto the last one, there’s few moments that attract any noteable attention.

Xander Harris delivers the final song on this compilation, titled “Social Leather“. When pushing play on this song, there’s a wondrous tone coming from the melody. It feels like you’re high above the clouds, or that you’re way out of your body and somewhere else. It has a dreamy touch to it and the vocals expand on that subject. There’s an electro-vibe to it vocally and the atmosphere is absolutely phenomenal. There’s a transgression between different electronic genres that he executes flawlessly.

Being the final song on this release, it makes up for other moments experienced while listening to the compilation. One must say, to DKA Record’s credit, that it is a compilation that has some kind of sense of purpose when it comes to the assortment of different artists – too bad that it doesn’t go the whole way in terms of how good that, in theory, should be. I must recommend it any way, because there are certain moments on this release that are enticing. Stream the full release down below on Soundcloud.

Exclusive Premiere: Weeping Rat – Eulogy

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These Australians have a weird habit of returning to my blog-zine. Weeping Rat is a mini-ensemble of Australian people whom I’ve written about before. Essentially, they’re a perfect example of what a band actually can do and how not to be a bland mess of influences. Changing themselves over time from a death-rock outfit to a more experimental industrial one. Having released stuff as far back as 2012, now beginning to shape their latest release “Eulogy“. Making a weird kind of transition when they released their two EPs “Forced Vision” and “Fractured Zones“, showcasing two different sides of what was to become a future release. Now they’re limiting themselves to a weird kind of mixture between industrial, cold wave and post-punk – experimenting between the three. Capturing a certain kind of melancholic vibe together with their unusual sounds, a clingy theme of an abrasive singer, with the inspiring percussion.

I got to put up the first single taken from this future release. This particular song is really what defines their new selves. Featuring a meditative rhythm, hiding away a cluster of percussion in what could be referenced as a rain-forest of instruments. At the same time there is a lot of things going on, but it doesn’t really hinder the atmosphere or make it clutter. Well, I put up the song a while ago and I hadn’t written about it until now. So here you are being given the first single from their forthcoming release. The song is called “Eulogy” as you might’ve already found out about. Let’s hope that you listeners enjoy it as well as much as I do.

 

Spotlight: Weeping Rat – Forced Vision/Fractured Zones!

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Melbourne, Australia. As the sun sets, the Weeping Rat comes out to feast. Having recorded music under this name since 2012, with their first release “Blood & Fog“, a duo consisting of Jacob and Michael – slowly, over time became a whole group. After having released their second release “Empty Hearse/Funeral Train“, it took them about one year and a half to return with a track with the name “Light Of The Moon“, in January of 2014. Since those releases, they’ve slowly moved away from the rock-aspect of death-rock, having more of the atmosphere which can be conceived in such a genre – to their advantage – which in turn created a rather sense of urgency beneath a layer of coldness. This resulted in a double-EP released in the month of April. The first EP to be put up was “Forced Vision” and the second one was “Fractured Zones“. There is a noticeable difference with these two releases, as they stray away from the grittiness of the death-rock sound, paving a way for a death-industrial-esque trip between the living and the dead. Focusing more in “Fractured Zones” on the general landscape of sound being conceived with the experimentalist notion of decayed noise in a dark ambient landscape. Whilst the other EP, “Forced Vision”, focuses more on the rock’n’roll aspect – wishfully entering the same realm – but on different conditions. Which makes these two releases quite different, even though much of what they have in common is rendered, abysmally.

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Though a lot of their sound might have a few things getting used to, it doesn’t sound flawed at all, but rather delivers an intermingling of genres seldom expressed by the artist – into such a sound-scape. Brooding is the total industrial transformation of Weeping Rat. Giving away a uncompromising and outdrawn sound, a secret that is being unveiled when you listen to it, making you feel part of a darker adventure. It doesn’t really make itself that great in text when trying to explain the picturesque landscape of decaying rot that these Australians produce. But it is a milestone in their own discography, making it perfectly clear that even they can change their outfit for better or worse – into something that is so out of touch with their ordinary, by now; memorabilia. Stream both EPs down below and listen to it, so you can discover a whole other side of their sound.

Spotlight: Ectoplasm / Jaqkquil – Ectoplasm / Jaqkquil!

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Since this release didn’t get the proper exposure, I thought that I would elaborate why it should get it. This release was a split between Ectoplasm and Jaqkquil, a playful distinction between light and darkness. With Jaqkquil representing the decayed urban environment with neon-signs, carefully selected dub and interesting dream-hop. Utilizing the chopped up samples in favor of creating a dreamy landscape of sounds, that sound unsettling to say the least. Maybe the dichotomy is the other way around, but I think (myself) that Jaqkquil represent the darker side of this cassette. Enchanting you with the poison of modern society, you twirl into position and imminently release information about yourself. It’s a tyrannical form of seduction, which leaves you hopelessly exploitable. It feels like they’ve found your weak spots and are using it against you, in a mesmerizing kind of way. The wayward feeling of longing, of the temporary loneliness that is a relationship. When everything breaks from its soil, the moment of clarity when you realize that everything could be fixed, but you didn’t do it anyway. Aggravatingly slow beats that pound the last bit of truth out of you, within the cherished landscape that feels like dreaming away, but is slowly pinching away on your own reality. You live in a world constructed by you and Jaqkquil, a false world that is about to break. Even though the tracks don’t clock in at more than 3 minutes maximum, it feels like an eternity.

Coming from a totally different perspective is Ectoplasm, with its gargantuan track that clocks in at roughly twenty minutes. A looming sense of ambient calmness is putting its blanket around you. Everything suddenly feels better, more meditative. You’re slowly floating outwards from the false world you were in, which is shattered by now. Together with a chillwave narrative that sets the premises. Nothing is more important than the surrounding cataclysm of cosmic might. Now, we’re living in NOW. The past and the future don’t count. As an out of body experience, you can steer the wheel a bit, but when it comes to the continually more abstract senses tingling around you – there’s nothing more you can do. It’s not a prison, but you’re stuck in your own immovable body. Carried by the waves of synthesized delight, which erupts into a weirdly uncanny rhythm of darker thoughts. Spaced out feelings collide with the cosmos itself, as the more minimalistic wrap is ripped apart in favor for a more melodic but grandiose entry. Weirdly enough, it feels like the track could be more than one single track. The experimentalist vein explores more than one dimension in this tattered landscape. At first, it illuminates and acts as a guide, but then you’re suddenly on your own – stomping on uncommon ground. I would recommend them both.

You can order this cassette from I Had An Accident Records. It’s worth it if you like crazy combinations. This is not classic in any way shape or form, this is pretty damn original.

Exclusive Stream: Gareth Psaltis – Voriulk

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Hunter Gatherer is an Australian label run by Mark Smith of Gardland. Together with him, we’ll be premiering a forthcoming release here for you to stream exclusively. Proudly announcing Gareth Psialtis, a Sydney native who’s debut-EP will be out on the 19th of August. It’s titled “Voriulk“, and runs between thoughtful minimalism, to grandiose settings together with the deep nerve of his techno. From the longer, to the more intensive, he’s incarnating the spirit to mold the tracks after his own mind. Buzzing saw-like teeth scratch the surface, floating debris is violently churned at you, with a constant rhythm of synthesizer’s delight. Carrying the weight of the sound-scape upon his shoulders, mechanizing his thought with an ultraviolet shimmer of violently clashing drums. It is fairly noticeable that this isn’t some digitized cop-out, because the sound is warm and crispy, to your analogue satisfaction. Stream his whole EP down below, and remember to visit his EP-launch on the 6th of September at The Civic Underground in Sydney.

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Thee Showcase [#8.5]: lié, Joanne Pollock, Wildlife and The Systemaddicts!

1775541042-1Hey, hey, hey! We’re at it again. You’re getting used to the presence of Thee Showcase. If you’re not, I’ll have to hypnotize you into thinking about it. Well, first up this time is the band lié which consists of three people from Vancouver, Canada. I actually chose to cover their “Demo” this time around, since I like it more then their self-released and self-titled cassette on Function Operate. This is the kind of punk we all want, the one that goes by the predecessors whip and conjures a post-punk feeling. Calling it “dark punk“, as it is called may be an apt description. It feels like cold wave and post-punk morphed into a crazy whirlwind of teargassed punk. It’s punk you really can’t have your eyes open to see, it is punk you simply must hear. Dwelling in the concrete dungeons of larger cities, symptomatic of that particular angst. It feels like they’re trying to convey the feeling of aridity. In general, their music is much more gritty, since its from their demo-sessions of the same tracks. At times it also feels like punk has left the building to get to know its replacement. Or, could it simply be a new form of punk? Might just be the aforementioned. Everything isn’t tight as it should be, it’s at times sloppy and draggy, which has a charm in itself. Vocally, outspoken and dangerously cold-hearted, is a new punk formula that might not be a replacement, as said before, but an understatement of the same. Pressurizing, tenderizing and materializing. Three words that can be describable, but might not actually be it. Well, fuck it, this is hard. But it is a great listen all-in-all. The three demo-tracks featured are “Muse“, “Pressure” and “Fossoyear“, released on the 29th of January by lié themselves.

4291335105-1As usual, I almost always miss great things. That’s why my blog sucks so much. Or, yeah, it might not suck – but I’m not always up to date. Time to feature the artist Joanne Pollock from Toronto. She’s released a smaller album with four tracks, which goes by the name of “December“. It is quirky, IDM-driven splendor which fuels my mind with a colorful entrapment. You’re drawn into it by the interesting use of everyday objects, or so it seems, when you listen to it. I might not even know if it is, but it surely sounds like it. This could’ve been featured in a Japanese anime, in any scene that involved a large-eyed youngster seeing his or her first carnival or the likes of it. One thing that is good, is that you simply cannot categorize it, even though you need to at times. It’s a slab of IDM here, a brick of ambient there and an experimental vein that never seems to stop its own flow. Nevertheless, every detail must be remembered and is remembered. That’s the fascinating thing about Pollock and her music, or at least this release. No tone goes unnoticed. It can go from simply minimalistic, to bombastic and grandiose in seconds. The rhythmic and arrhythmic sense of belonging fuels the grace of her music and puts it in a cup for you to drink up. Think of a sensational meal you had, but make it transgress into music and I can assure you that this is what it sounds like. It provokes an emotional reaction that is hard to stray away from, since you bob your head to the music and think: “Ah, that’s where she put it!” when suddenly, out of nowhere, a sound comes out and grazes you with its virtual appearance. Four tracks are featured on this release, ranging from “Home“, “First Night In“, “Quiet Places” and the last track “How Fortunate“. It seems like she released this herself.

1004747893-1Quickly, we must move out of this, right now! It’s time for something completely different. This time the menu features Wildlife, which is a relatively stable and mainstream indie band, also from Canada. Four guys from the land in the north of the US of A. They’ve released a twelve-tracked, full-fledged album, which goes by the name of “…On The Heart“. A pretty fascinating release, since the depth of the music is uncompromising and not on the stick of the indie-elite. Nothing here is underproduced nor lo-fi. It also sounds like it could be featured in a film or something like it, since the width of space they have their chessboard on is so wide. Also, the sincerity of the vocalist is very tell-tale, as he includes you into their story with the first track. Therefore, you’re stuck on a journey now, trying to delve into the most uptight of indie-rock. I don’t mean uptight as in anything negative, simply that they live and thrive of simplicity, where love-songs and the positive humorist approach is dominating. Which re-assures you of a world that isn’t that dark after all, with the colliding drums, the spectrum of different riffs and solos at hand. Something a little bit unconventional, after all, even though it sounds pretty mainstream. This will hopefully take the crown and make sure that they’re ruling hereafter. But, hey, I like it a lot. It is nostalgic at heart, at least for me, since it reminds me of a lot of the earlier posturing of indie-pop and rock – but also bands in that particular genre that sought out the middle. Featuring songs ranging from “If It Breaks” to “Two Hearts Race“, released on the 5th of March on Wax Records.

2095041751-1Last but not least, we feature another even more interesting band. This time, breaking the streak that Canada has had, since this band – called The Systemaddicts, are from Australia. One of the surprises when hunting for music is when you return to the point you’ve been at all the time. Simply not realizing that a new album has been released, which was titled: “Do You Really Want My Love?“. It came out now in the month of March. A strength that you can give them is that they’re a larger group of people making music, which means a lot of instruments are included that are not normally used. An organ, some trumpets and an unconventional approach. Too bad that the singer sounds like he’s off-key with the rest of the band, but I like this voice. That isn’t the focus though, since the music is hell of a lot tighter. Which is what my brain automatically focuses on. It’s melodic, somewhat upbeat and you can’t even think it’s garage-rock, but it is. One thing that is punk, however, is the singer. Because he is breaking the rules and when you hear the pipe he’s got, you’d be surprised. At times it just feels like he’s completely defiant. Somehow he manages to add another color to the sound-scape with his outrageous behavior! Or, yeah, maybe not outrageous – but punk! I like what I’m hearing even though it might not be my favorite thing about them. Though it reminds me a lot of the older bands within the same genre, but maybe a step further away from garage-punk and rock. Yeah, you should simply check it out. Featuring tracks like “Hill and Sea” and “Jam (Secret Track)“, released by themselves, I suppose.

Thee Showcase [#8.4]: Juventud Juché and Gardland!

379909952-1Well, we’re not even done here, so what am I doing? I’m searching far and wide, collecting some of the bands that needs to be showcased. Time for Thee Showcase, this time finding its way to southern latitudes. The Spaniards from Juventud Juché are featured this time. Their latest 7¨ is estimated to have been released in 2012, but they’ve put it up on bandcamp this year. It’s titled “Discos Walden” and is a messy upbeat, rhythmic annihilation that deserves a slap on the wrist for the most post-punkish thing since the 80’s. It’s probably one of the more fitting releases to have the Spanish language included on a release. Since I haven’t really bothered to listen to any Spanish post-punk, this is as close as I get. The melodies are simply outrageous in their own right. A hint of garage can also be found, in the middle of everything, making the vocalist sound crazy and confronting. In any universe where the baseline and the riffs don’t collide, will make a new planet that is deserving of the name “planet“. Both the rhythmic jig of Juventud Juché is celebratory at best and continuous at worst. The kind of energy they bring to the table is filled with suspense and it will make you rock out in your own bedroom, making a fool out of yourself. It also makes me want to learn Spanish. The crossover between garage-punk and post-punk is simply awesome, garnering the tight baselines of post-punk and the distorted landscape of garage-punk in the one and the same, tight category. Also, the variation of their sound-scape, when it comes to how they lay it out – is simply astonishing. It can go from extremely upbeat, to almost downbeat and annoyingly repetitive. But at least there’s a point to it being that, which is to withhold more of the same and bring out more of the other. Featuring songs ranging from “Gibraltar Español” to “Ainhoa“, originally released in 2012 on Gramaciones Grabofónicas, also put out on bandcamp at the 22nd of February.

1369216745-1My, oh my, do we like analogue over here? Yes we do. Remembering the true days of real shit. No, just kidding, but it is kind of nostalgic. The duo featured here is Gardland, a pair of techno-crazed Australians. He’s currently put up his self-titled debut-EP “Gardlands“. Something that’s great with analog sounds is that you get a deeper, more crisp and broadened sound. It doesn’t sound the least plastic and the dynamics between the booming base drums and the more experimental sounds in the mix sound terrifyingly close. It actually reminds you about a lot of the more classic techno, or at least of that which has seen its years. The chaotic environment, the stable and pumping beat, equipped with the analogue vitality that is Techno – can only go one way, which is the successful way. At least if you think about it in a musical perspective. Everything is connected, through and throughout, with a more subtle change within the sound-scape that totally ridicules everything that’s gone through a filter. Here’s some real stuff that will make you shake, that will make you appreciate the sound. It slowly progresses into an abomination, a rolling ball which you cannot stop and a coherent landscape in which those addicted to the genre, can get their fix. I must admit that I rarely write about this genre, their predecessors or anything related, but I can always appreciate a good round of Techno if I ever feel one. My eardrums aren’t bleeding, but they’re shaken because of the experience. Much of it is thanks to the equipment, but the work with the sound-scape is the key. Now, all I can hear is: “Repetition is the key“, which is a line from the track “1767“. Quickly, you’re focused with all your senses and you feel them activating, just to captivate the experience alone. It might be repetitive, but there are things that keep you listening to it and there are things which you simply can’t let go from. Probably some of the better Techno I’ve heard for a while. Tracks featured on the EP are “Decalogue“, “1767“, “Plague Bearer” and “Haut Mal“. Released by himself on the 28th of February. It seems to be totally D.I.Y.

Extremely Huge Showcase [#4]: The Straw Men, Ballerina Black, DieTRAX/FFF, Bulletins, MUGSTAR and Skinner Box!

Have we got something for you right now! First up is The Straw Men, which basically was a post-punk/alternative band from the Sydney 1980s and they’ve re-released some forgotten material from their album “inland sea“. They’re really unconventional when it comes to post-punk, as they deploy some more funky and blues-oriented sound combined with that particular genre. At times, they sound like a combination between Au Pairs and some other unknown band that I can’t really categorize. Every single riff, the drumming and the atmosphere tells a story in itself. I would say that they don’t even need any lyrics, because you can tell by the sound-scape that it’s a whole adventure put down into the mix. There’s always been some different takes from Australia when it comes to post-punk, which is appreciated. You shouldn’t underestimate their employment of the psychedelic elements either, since they pull it off perfectly. The songs featured on this release range from “Refugee Stomp” to “Into The Night“, and it seems like they’ve self-released it.

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Interview with James from Plunder The Tombs!

Plunder-the-Tombs

Plunder The Tombs is a blog ran by the Australian gentleman James. It features in-depth writings about everything from goth to death rock, which means everything that could fit into that category or be related. His blog is an investigation into the heart of what goth rock was, as he proceeds to sift through every great release there ever was. With his expertise within the genre as a lodestar for his writings. He’s been involved with everything you could imagine, being a DJ since the 90’s in the Perth area of Australia, playing in clubs such as The Cell and Dominion, which were largely goth-themed clubs. He also helped found the 6RTR FM’s goth & industrial showcased called Darkwings. His blog also largely revolves around the first wave of gothic, which would be the years from 1979 to 1988. It is also a blog that I’ve followed or stumbled upon when browsing the internet, so I decided to interview him about everything from the first wave of goth rock, to the definition of goth rock and everything you’d ever want to know about that particular genre and the blog Plunder The Tombs. Hope you enjoy your stay and may The Sisters Of Mercy be with you.

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