Exclusive Premiere: White Christian Male – Infection

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The first thing I would think about when it comes to classic industrial music is – provocation. Many of the artists and groups from back then gained notoriety by doing just that. Whether it came to taboo non-politically correct topics about virtually anything that doesn’t hold root in modern society. Often challenging the “norms” of yesteryear. When it comes to White Christian Male (Dennis Hudson), I don’t really think it holds up to that standard – considering that the tables are now turned and political correctness seep through everything. I’m not sure if he’s trying to be provocative with the name “White Christian Male“, or if he’s paying heed to the white christian male. But it surely is an eye-catcher which makes you want to see what it is like beneath the layer of provocation – intentional or not. His music can be held to a higher degree because of his sheer craftsmanship when it comes to the beats, atmosphere and whatnot. Everything falls in place with an interesting sound.

It came as a surprise to hear a darkwave-coated synth-pop sound when you see the iconography and plus one with one. This held true when it came to his older tracks, which are actually pretty good considering how lame darkwave tend to be in most cases. Since then, he’s transcended his old sound which was marked for departure with his track “Live It Down” on the Chromatin Records compilation “Artificial Selections“. Note that he’s not left the influences taken from darkwave, but rather stripped the melodious synth-pop sound and put a harsh industrial surface down instead. Even though it holds true to some of his other tracks, like covers of “Blue Monday” and “Warm Leatherette” – he’s simulated his way through experimentation – paying his dues to ambient as well. Before he went all out industrial, his covers show an organic process of ridding the more melodious content, stripping the sound down and going into industrial for real – but only in the rhythmically and melodious sense to begin with.

Therefore I have gotten a track from him, namely the seventh track from his forthcoming release on Chromatin Records. The track is titled “Infection” and is featured on an album that will go by the name of “The Jagged Womb“. Hear the mangling sounds that will make a resounding noise each time it crackles skulls. A barren industrial landscape with bleak metal as the only surface you’ll ever feel. Dive down into a steel-bath which is only preserved to hold the utmost contempt towards humanity. A pain that is so real that you can feel it, feel it linger down your spine and leave you breathless. It is an immense experience to listen to “Infection” and I now get to share it with you exclusively. It features a long industrial opening, a first part if you will, which by the second half of it turns into a maelstrom of darkwave, minimal synth and industrial combined. Stream it exclusively down below and see to it that you buy his album when it comes out on Chromatin Records – in October.

Review: Various Artists – Artificial Selections

a3207601573_10More then a week ago, a new compilation emerged out of the alternative underground. A compilation that caught people off guard because of the beautiful representation of cold-wave, post-punk and experimental selections – including a wider variation of genres. Featuring both unrepresented artists and those who are not. First off are Excuses, the solo-project by Matthew Rowe whose debut was put out on the now defunct label Function Operate, back in 2012. This self-titled release featured five songs but his contribution to the compilation was with the track “We Are Fuel“. It is a raw track which lets a dodgy atmosphere with shoegaze fill out the sound-scape, together with the ambivalent riffing you’d only find within darker post-punk. Although his vocals on this song isn’t up to par with the rest of the landscape of sound, it is held up by the general mood that he delivers with sincerity. I just wish it was coupled with a better vocal representation because right now it sounds too cheesy. But I must say that it is a good opener which sets the bar for the rest of the compilation higher up.

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