Listen: Walk Onto Sun – Grow Static

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Walk Onto Sun released his second release, and second EP “Grow Static” in October of 2017, it’s been a long time since I was introduced to it by the musician himself – but now is the time to delve into the music – and see if it holds up as well as his first debut-EP “In the Inside“.

First trackIsn’t Real” is a stunning piece that grows on you after the first erratic steps the beats take in different directions, stuttering beats that flow upon an atmosphere of otherworldliness and paranoia – slowly taking the form of a regular four-oh-four beat, but taking bits and pieces out of the sound-scape the further in you get, making it as weird as it was starting out, as you get to the end.

It’s like a bad dream that you can’t awake from. Some of the vocals make you wonder when it will turn into a proper martial industrial piece, but it holds its guard up against such a transgression. Even though some if it might seem out of rhythm, the blending of arrhythmic noises and confusing electronic synthesizers together – makes you realize what time went into making this song.

Hollowed Out” is more sinister, it follows less of an experimental route, and includes the deep baselines you’d want to hear in his music – a more ritualistic approach in combination with industrial music, in the setting of a post-industrial séance. Even though it is more primitive in relation to the first song, the vocals make it a monotonous piece of music as it drives you into a feverish state of mind.

Though some of the vocals might turn you off from the track, you take time to appreciate the wondrously created atmosphere – as it seems to turn for a more wicked approach each time a new sound is added in, but never lets you down when it come to being consistent without making it too predictable.

InFeral Plains“, Ben Engebretson (Walk Onto Sun) is assisted by Steve Holms in the form of metal percussions – this is really what keeps the song on track and adds a focused vibe to an otherwise outdrawn, hazy kind of downtempo ambient industrial music. We’re not sure if the vocals are meant to be so monotonous, but it both adds and takes away from the general feel of the song.

Ironically enough, the title-track “Grow Static” and the last song of the release, is actually the best one in our opinion. It summarizes what Walk Onto Sun is capable of when he channels the right percussion at the right time, the right rhythm at the right time – and the right atmosphere at the right time. Everything in this song seems way more planned then in the other ones, so hopefully this can make a full-length album a reality in this year before it ends.

All-in-all it is an interesting album, he strays away from the first EP a lot, but much of it is more of the same. It doesn’t matter if it stays this way or if it develops, but some of the more experimental elements in his music is not that alluding – but the vocals on the last song is more impressive then those on the rest of the EP.

Make up your mind on your own and listen to it in full down below.

Review: L’Avenir – Soir

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A couple of months ago Cold Beats Records announced the fourth album by L’Avenir, titled “Soir“. In terms of aesthetics he’s been consistent but it is not the most pleasing artwork to lay your eyes upon. There’s a certain connection between each of his albums and it is noticeable even though he’s shifted to a more ethereal approach on this release. He’s kept the most interesting elements of his music and developed it into an otherworldly experience – but how that holds up in practice is what you’ll find out – in this latest track-by-track review on Repartiseraren.

The introductory for this album, “Modern World” is excitingly refreshing to hear as it starts off but when the melody is laid down in the song, it gets increasingly mind-numbing. Going from laying a creative and ethereal sound, bouncing from ambient to minimal wave, synth-pop and back again – is simply astonishing. The lyrics hold up well and the dismayed tone of the sound is also an unpleasant reminder of the topic that Jason brings up in this song.

As the song comes to a close, another melody is laid upon the frankly cheesy melody that he decided to delve too much into. This other melody is more in tune with the overall sound and fits the picturesque notion he deliver with the rhythm, drums and occasional synthesizer bravado. Conceptually the song is much better, however it lacks severely in captivating melodies and make it a blunder in terms of the passage between the intro and the outro.

Desert” is way more of a stable track, which in its essence has a great melody and move toward a decent sound. The problem with the song is that it suffers from the opposite of what the first one did, that is the vocals and lyrical content isn’t that good to begin with -but the melodies, rhythm and everything else that carries the atmosphere and develops it into something more are consistently surprising – in a good way. The alarming nature of high-note synthesizers is reminiscent of Person:A.

Another thing must be said about this and that is how the rhythm in the beginning slowly drags the listener into the sound-scape and lets the ambient side of L’Avenir glisten. It is good that the vocals and the lyrics don’t take up much of a space in general and that one can drift away, enjoying the remainder of the music itself and how he professionally crafts what is his own sound.

InThe Stranger” the beats get heavier and more pulsating. There’s an eerie darkness and the synthesizers get to be in the background a lot more, as the vocals and the rhythm are the first and foremost benefiters in this song. The rhythm is simple yet hypnotizing when the base drum resounds and the snare drum hits, a very unchanging atmosphere that relies on what already has been presented in the beginning of it. It’s overall the best sounding tune so far.

As it switches into more ambient settings the further in you get, the melodies layer beautifully upon one another and connect marvelously, inserting that much needed emotional touch which L’Avenir can pull off brilliantly. This is where the transition into “Mirror Men” goes painfully, as they share many of the elements that made “The Stranger” and “Desert” much better then “Modern World“.

WithMirror Men” you can almost hear some of the hints that are so lovable in Drab Majesty, for example. A sound-scape clad in an ethereal form, where smoke sifts through the cracks and give off a mysteriously but huge atmospheric draped in a synth-pop outfit. The melodies are crystal clear and put forth some kind of eerie existentialist but immortal vibe to it. Your body is more then a vessel, it is one metaphysical step closer to god and the divine. The beats have also become more concentrated and punched up, there’s more guts in this song.

Silence Shouts” become more of a standardized song for “Soir” after the aforementioned one. A bridge to something else. But he utilizes the differentiating vocals in this song to create a worthwhile listening experience. The more you get into it the further it develops in the background, together with the constant synthesizer-baseline and then a grandiose section is dropped in – the synthesizers get more brazen and deliver a more confident version of the same song. Hearing the different components go out of their way, some of them in a minuscule fashion, others drift away into complex melodies, is very satisfying.

Then comes a transgression from regular minimal synth and synth-pop, a more electronic body music oriented vibe in “Winter Calls“. If the other songs had a string of sublimity in it – this is when the hammer hits the nail – it is without any mysterious intent and more with a colder touch. Here’s where the concept have been on point with the actual song it self. As the beats stumble more and stutter, the synthesizers are more concentrated then ever. It doesn’t stand and fall with the rhythm and beats, it stands on its own in melodies and general atmosphere.

Now whenOutside” comes on, it hits right at home but there’s something off with the sound, one doesn’t know if it is intentional or if it is the masterer’s fault. We on Repartiseraren have released “Outside (Just Like Home)” on a compilation before this. It sounds a bit different. The melodies should be more apparent then they really are, the beats are too hollow and in front of the atmosphere that should be felt in a different way. It is as if someone activated a drum-machine and had the intentions of making another song, at the same time that L’Avenir made “Outside“. It doesn’t really fit.

It is one of the more serious disappointments on this release. “What Happened To Yesterday” is, however, a great example of the adaptiveness of Jason’s music as it is a pure synth-pop gem. The melodies are central and bring out the soul of the song immaculately. Even though some parts of it ain’t my cup of tea, one can not dismiss it in its entirety. Atmospherically the song is huge and covers more territory then any other on this album. Synthesizers are in the background and foreground without the rhythm or beats interfering in an awkward way. A great addition to a so far alright release.

The songVivet” is more playful in its style and stray away from the seriousness in the music at times, giving it a more ambiguous feeling while listening to it. A very dancefloor-friendly song. Rhythmically it is enchanting and nothing bad could be said about it, it is the embodiment of what L’Avenir tries to say and establish with this release. It is funny how the songs gradually get better, then as they get better it turns for the worse and come back to the greater side where they could’ve stayed in the first place.

Had this album been released in August or September instead, “August” would’ve been the epitome of an outro – the change from summer to fall – for better or worse. A sullen baseline carries the rhythm of sharpened beats that steadily marks the end of “Soir“. Even though you’ve already been given a lot to listen to, it doesn’t end with the outdrawn melodies and simple beats to shut everything down and call it a day, there are bonus tracks and remixes available as well. Let’s take them on.

Interestingly enough, “No Destination (Bonus Track)” is a really experimental gem that should’ve been saved for the b-side instead of one of the other songs. Not to mention “Fault” – which is quite frankly one of the best songs on this release. Even though one gets why “No Destination” doesn’t fit the album, “Fault” could’ve easily outmaneuvered one of the A-Side tracks – because it is really, really great. The fast-paced rhythm, playful synthesizer melodies and overall great, ambitious sound-scape is reason enough.

Denial (Bonus Track)” is also one of those songs that would’ve made it better on the line-up for the original line-up. It has a well-crafted atmosphere and even though it might be a bit more experimental, it is way better and more inspiring then “Moonlight (Bonus Track)“. Experimentalism doesn’t always have to be on the bad side of the spectrum, it could very well be a more enthralling song more fitting on an album such as this.

Remixes, what about them? Well, they’re in most cases hit or miss – oftentimes more a miss. Forever Grey make a reasonably ok attempt at their version of “Mirror Men“, but the original stands much taller and this remix does nothing to stand out on its own, not a memorable attempt either. But there’s something about it that is charming but it is reserved for some parts of the remix only. Since the original song “Outside” was ruined, it is nice to hear the Person:A-remix which deliver some really claustrophobic, minimalistic cold-wave interpretation of the original. He’s managed to pull off a really ominously sounding melody, that make the song less upbeat and more downbeat.

The breakdowns made by Kline Coma Xero on “What Happened To Yesterday” are charming but not enough to be considered great, but it adds a different touch and a whole new version of the original track, that coupled with auto-tuning gives it an experimental electronic and electro-ish vibe. MAKiNA GiRGiR‘s rework of  the same song almost makes it a chiptune tribute, one of the best remixes on this album for sure. They have a really minimalistic approach and it becomes a song on its own, ready to stand by itself in the atmosphere they’ve created and especially the melodies.

When the song “Silent Shouts” get the remix treatment by Nina Belief, it unfortunately falls on its own into the category of uninspiring. Had the beats matched the tempo better and her vocals as well, it might’ve been an off-shoot into something different and more alluring. This is most definitely a miss in terms of the remixes. The remix of “The Stranger” by Lola Kumtus is not anything interesting either, unfortunately. It just rehashes the song and makes it more cloudy, repetitive and basic.

So this is what I think of this album. In terms of the overall quality the record is not the best L’Avenir can do but it is worth listening to, since it contains a few really great songs and some that are not as great. You can listen to the album in full down below and if you like it, you can order a double-CD or a vinyl as well from Cold Beats Records.

 

 

My visit to Kalabalik på Tyrolen 2017

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Kalabalik på Tyrolen is a festival arranged by Klubb Kalabalik annually at Tyrolen – a picturesque site located at Blädinge not far away from Alvesta, in Småland, Sweden. The arrangement has a history that dates back to 2011 and live-acts such as The Horrorist, Kite, Schwefelgelb, Dernière Volonté, Absolute Body Control, Martial Canterel, and Portion Control – to mention a selection of the diverse multitude of electronic and non-electronic acts alike – that have played there. 

The club itself, Klubb Kalabalik, have hosted a multitude of club nights in Växjö since 2005. Christoffer Gunnarsson and his crew seem to have placed themselves high above many festivals, which made one eager to visit and see what it was like. This year included acts such as Diesel Dudes, Sturm Café, Die Selektion and Kaelan Mikla – in what I personally wanted to see live the most, plus acts that I had never heard about or knew somewhat of – but wanted to give a chance.

Here’s my personal account of what went down musically and socially at Kalabalik på Tyrolen 2017.

After waiting half of the day until the train was going to depart from Malmö to Alvesta, I indulged in the playlist that Klubb Kalabalik had set up on Spotify. Upon hearing some of the acts that were going to play there, I didn’t really muster up any excitement for my trip. As the time to depart came even closer, one became increasingly nervous as to what to expect from this festival. Going from the scenic beauty of the Scanian landscape to the darkness of the dense forests in Småland was a change of scenery one hadn’t felt in some time. Everything went as it should on the trip and the train was cozier then anticipated.

Upon arrival in Alvesta, it sure was very different from Malmö. A tiny society in comparison. But it felt like a breeze in comparison and somewhat of a vacation from the ‘big city’. Since there’s not an ounce in me that wanted to pitch up a tent in the now rainy Småland, a hotel felt better suited for me as a form of relaxation and a better place to live, quite frankly. After having checked in, settled in, and the time closing in for the first act that I wanted to see on Tyrolen, I called a cab and went down to await it. It took some time before it arrived, but I was greeted by fellow people going to the festival themselves.

I thought it was going to be a further ride into the forests then it actually was, about ten minutes away from Alvesta itself. Quickly the ride became more of a social event then I would’ve thought it had been and the people I shared a cab with were really nice to talk to. A dimension of traveling to this festival that I hadn’t accounted for when I was on my way there, was meeting with all the people I know through my zine and label. Upon arriving to Tyrolen, it wasn’t the picturesque kind of place I had thought it would be – but as we got out of the cab, getting closer to the entrance, I was proven wrong.

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Tyrolen at night

A very picturesque and stylish sign, in bright red and yellow stated the following: “Tyrolen“. As one walked through the entrance, the bright lights that formed a column straight forward also gave off a nice aesthetically pleasing vibe, which was especially true the darker it got throughout the day, as the evening was closing in. Before the first act was going to play, that I was personally excited to hear live, my newfound friend and I became more acquainted and discussed the schedule and what to see. We were both, apparently, going to see Kaelan Mikla.

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Kaelan Mikla live, 19:00 on Friday the 25th of August

To be honest, I had been shunning Kaelan Mikla and their music for some time. First time I heard them, they were really exciting – but it got tiresome at one point to listen. As we moved down to hear them play, it really was a seance-like appearance they quickly laid down. It was enthralling to hear every song they played and it was very different to hear them play live then it is listening to their records. One part of me couldn’t stop moving to the beat of the music and the further into the live-set we got, the more I danced.

What appeased me the most was the bassist and her style of playing, it really added to the theatrical vibe that Kaelan Mikla managed to pull off convincingly. There was something about her rocking back and forth which made one be able to completely enjoy dancing and at the same time viewing their prowess on stage. When the final song was to be played, frankincense was lit and the mood became even darker, a perfect end to a great show.

The core of their music became more appealing as they channeled their ritualistic nature completely and let it self-destruct. It was almost as a religious experience dancing to it, especially after they had plowed through a few songs. Certainly a great start to an increasingly exciting festival to be at, which had frankly just started.

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Lode Runner live at 20:20 on Friday the 25th of August

Next up was Lode Runner – a band I had never heard of, apparently they were from Russia. Having had a discussion as what to see next, I parted from my newly found friend as I went over to see what all the fuzz was about, as a bigger crowd of people were gathering outside the next, smaller stage called “Joddelero” – “Rotundan” was the bigger stage, where Kaelan Mikla performed. Here is where I began to seriously dance my ass off. Even though many of the songs had the same rhythmical component with different variations, the music was beyond great to listen to.

The energetic nature of the post-punk that Lode Runner bestowed upon us made for some very unorthodox moves on my part. Even though the experience was not close to the religiousness of the dance that went down to Kaelan Mikla, there was some shoegazing happening and a foot forward, two steps back kind of minimalist dancing. People were getting more and more excited as to what lay ahead of them and it was a noticeable shift from the more gloomy, not as enthusiastic dancing going on earlier.

After having heard them perform, it was clear that nothing could beat them live – having listened to their music afterwards in comparison. They can truly be considered to be more of a live-act then a studio act, for the moment at least. As people got increasingly drunker they let loose a bit more and it seemed like people were excited for Die Selektion. Before all of this I had also met some of the people that I met in Malmö a year ago, one of them actually performing with Forces later that night.

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Die Selektion live at 21:20 on Friday the 25th of August

Die Selektion. What can I really say? I enjoyed their latest album “Deine Stimme Ist Der Ursprung Jeglicher Gewalt” which was a refreshing insight into what they’re capable of, so of course I had to watch them play live. Enthusiastically at first, I stood in front as they began to play and song after song poured out. Here, somewhere, I hit a metaphysical state of questioning my experience at Kalabalik, induced by the mesmerizing nature of trumpet-playing and energetic maneuvering by Luca (the singer). It became some kind of existential angst, a blurred line between just existing and philosophizing – which made me go further back and sit on the bench through the rest of the show.

Really a clash of two perspectives – being active and dancing to their music – and sitting back, enjoying how other people seemed to be into it in full, at the same time analyzing the bands move from subliminal presence to a full-on assault musically and owning the stage. As the show went on it became more and more interesting to watch and listening to, from a “shy” beginning to an outburst of emotions only available to those present.

It really felt as one was blessed by their presence and the curse of the existential angst slowly but surely faded away. As they said their goodbyes and the stage was going from full to empty once again, the excitement grew for seeing Diesel Dudes live for the first time. As quickly as they set up, as quickly the show started. It was time to get involved for real. Cue a blurry picture and enter a complete war-zone.

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Here’s where the creative ambition to be a photograph faded.

In come two burly dudes. The epitome of Diesel Dudes. After laying my jacket and hoodie on the floor, I quickly were to be involved in frantic dancing with the lead singer of Lode Runner in close proximity around me. What began as frantic dancing as the most, slowly became an outdoor gym where testosterone was administered by Douglas Du Fresne (the singer) together with his pal in a quite bizarre fashion, musically. After the first song or so, the dancefloor grew to be a wild mosh-pit that included virtually everyone in a big half-circle, to the joy of more passive onlookers.

When people were beginning to flail their arms violently and totally flip out, everyone was in some sort of ecstatic camaraderie and everyone who took a tumble was quickly helped up to continue the electronic body music-infused madness that had slowly brewed into a complete storm. Douglas even influenced me to do a few push-ups. There was a certain shift in attitude the further everything went on and it was evident that people got more excited and involved as the songs were quickly thrown out there until there was none left – but then people shouted they wanted more – and were given some.

Diesel Dudes have a uniqueness about them which I’ve never felt on a show for a long time, maybe even seven years. Their brand of electronic body music takes on the anarchic side of electro-punk and the attitude they bear with them resounds throughout the audience enough to make everything you do intense. For those of you who missed out on this show, it was really one of the two highlights of the festival. A once in a lifetime experience – to be honest.

Unfortunately for the other musicians, here’s where I was fatigued enough to just sit back and enjoy everything else from a distant. Here’s where the social theme of the festival became more evident, as I met more and more people I hadn’t met before. From hearing Whispering Sons from a distance, to wondering what could be made out of Easter to completely abandoning everything to socializing backstage with people. Even though the social aspect of this festival can be exaggerated, as people tended to move within their social circles and little cliques, there were a certain friendliness backstage among the artists that had performed and us others.

Now the time had arrived to move to Forces, but unfortunately not much of it was experienced due to hanging out backstage and venturing further away from the festival, nearer the DJ-tent. But it was perfectly enjoyable to hear them play from a distance, it invoked a certain kind of feeling which enhanced the social sphere and made the conversations more appealing in the end. Unfortunately for the DJ’s the electricity came and went like it wanted, which was a shame. There were some really good jams coming out of there, as I spent my remainder of the time going from a caravan to a backstage-caravan.

For someone like me to last through the whole night is a unique thing. My last experience of a festival being Peace & Love in 2011 which was nothing in comparison to what this had become. One thing can be said about the social atmosphere of the festival and it was meeting people you’ve either made releases with, written about or simply learned to know otherwise in connection with Repartiseraren. The appreciation and knowledge of what I do was astounding, even coming from people I haven’t chatted that much with.

After almost falling asleep and not being able to catch a cab until two hours later, in the middle of the night, almost the next morning – was a frustration. Coming home from that, with the experiences that I was given on the first day of Kalabalik, was a lot to process and reintegrate into the mind the other day. So many good and positive things on the same day, giving in less and less to the more anxious side of things.

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Saturday the 26th of August

Sleeping from early in the morning the next day, up until it was time to venture out to Tyrolen once again, it became even more attracting as it was my opportunity to say hello to more people I didn’t have time to greet the first day. I decided to come there a bit later since I really wanted to start off the evening by seeing Sturm Café live for the first time ever. This was one of those moments I had been waiting for and one of the main attractions for my visit to Kalabalik.

My newly found friend from the first day was munching on a pizza and followed me to the bigger stage were we sat down to look at Sturm Café. Just about ten to twenty minutes before that I had greeted Gustav (the singer) of the band and hoped to hear what they could produce as a live-act – which didn’t concern me since they are veterans themselves, and have played many shows before. Before they went on-stage the inversion of Diesel Dudes were playing on the other stage, and they had some really catchy tunes, as Morning Hands. It was from a distance, like experience the total opposite of what Diesel Dudes had been about on Friday.

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Sturm Café live at 20:00 on Saturday the 26th of August

Queue the anticipation as Sturm Café went on and everyone from the festival seemed to be gathering at the same spot – literally most of the people were present at this concert, and from my view it was the most popular out of them all, in terms of the audience. Unfortunately I was too tired to re-live my experience at Diesel Dudes the other night, but they surely churned out some tunes and everyone were dancing lively to the pop-sounding electronic body music that Sturm Café have mastered throughout the years.

This time they played mostly classics and also delivered the best versions of these songs -as they should be heard – live. The execution of each song was absolutely flawless. After having a highlight for my first day on the festival, this became the other one and the best one, really. Upon hearing “Koka Kola Freiheit” the whole place erupted and the drums were amazing – the bass was resounding and blurting out uncompromisingly to everyone’s delight. The dancefloor was alive once more. It seemed like the quality of the sound was somehow enhanced, be that because of the production of the songs or the digging engineer in front of me, should be untold. But there was an overall difference.

I wish I had seen them earlier, they are really much more than what can be described about them. I am proud to have contributed to their discography in the form of a cassette-release. They have a certain quality musically that not many groups in the electronic body-genre can produce. Even though one might scorn them upon a first listening, this is one of those groups that can’t be dismissed just on their approach to the genre in terms of lyrics and concept.

Around the same time as Friday, the festival turned into more of a social event and I managed to hook up with more of the people I had only seen profile pictures of, or had spoken with before without being able to meet them in person. It gave a certain quality to the social interaction being on the same festival as them. It is a shame that it is only a yearly occurrence. I had been stoking the flames of my own excitement for Bestial Mouths, but even though they delivered some nice interpretations of their works, it didn’t give me the same kind of motivation I had gotten earlier.

Then I heard Xarah Dion from afar and was enthralled about her emotional deliveries of the music she’d created. I hadn’t really listened that closely to the music itself before but was attuned to it even more the more times I passed going from inside the festival to just outside in the camping-area. She had some really great songs in her repertoire, even though I didn’t experience it closer than that, it was a pleasant listening session for myself in my newly found social environment.

It is hard to sum up this festival and it isn’t necessary to have actively participated in every DJ-set or live-act, but it turned out to be a great listening experience whether one was directly involved by dancing or appreciating the music closely, or simply hearing it from a different perspective whilst engaging in other activities. I must say that I have never been to a more well-organized festival in terms of music, general pleasurableness and the non-existence of violence and anti-social behavior. Even though Kalabalik på Tyrolen is a very small festival in comparison to other counterparts – it is hands down – the best festival I’ve ever been to.

The sheer work of Christoffer Gunnarsson and his crew should serve as an inspiration to other D.I.Y.-festival makers for the future. It is really an impeccable show of hostesship. The fact that you can also get closer to the artists is a huge plus. Otherwise you’re locked out of that opportunity. They’ve really outdone themselves for me as a first time visitor and I was lucky enough to be personally invited as well, which for me is an honor and just cements the importance of Repartiseraren further. For the first time in these environments, since being invited to The Foreign Resort backstage in Christiania – have I felt that what I do make a difference and that people actually enjoy it.

I would be dismayed if there weren’t a Kalabalik på Tyrolen 2018. I would go again even if I weren’t a guest to the festival in terms of my hobby. They have another important factor about what makes them great as well and that is the representation of more established artists and smaller artists that get the same playground, basically. You’re intrigued about watching artists perform that you haven’t heard about and even though not everything might be one’s cup of tea, the variety is stunning for such a small initiative.

Thank you so much for one of my best experiences in terms of music, in 2017. It brought up so many feelings and the organizers, artists, new friends and old friends have my deepest respect. You are the variation we sorely need.

Yours sincerely,

Repartiseraren

Premiär: Æmɨt teaser, spelning på Under Bron den 9/3

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Under hemlighetsfullhetens fana, nåja, åtminstone i ljudväg – har Æmɨt skapats – sprungen ur eller åtminstone inspirerade av uråldrig Egyptisk mytologi (läs: Ammit), och med fanbärarna Jonas Fredriksson (ALVAR), Erik Söderberg (Kinder aus Asbest) och Jimmy Svensson (Yabibo Hazurfa/Slusk), så blir deras gemensamma insats monumental på enbart tre minuter. Det de levererar är motståndskraftig industriell techno med fokus på en trollbindande slags atmosfärisk industriell musik, där mystiska syntslingor drabbar samman med rungande bastrummor – som blir en hetlevrad men återhållsam kombination. Det måste påpekas att det förmodligen är såhär det skulle låta när dessa män låter sina alter ego formas till ett – på pricken.

Musiken har en trollbindande rytm och en säregen karaktär. Ljudlandskapet har en röd tråd man kan hänga med i och den är väldigt dansvänlig. Estetiken är mörk som den borde vara, vilket ger en sammanhängande känsla i sig då det även påminner en om att detta gemensamma projekt drar i flera trådar samtidigt – eftersom att man lyckas vara både musikaliskt och estetiskt tilltalande – detta hade varit något som hade kunnat släppas på Beläten om den etiketten fortfarande hade varit i bruk. Rent produktionsmässigt är det ingenting som fallerar heller, alla små nyanser som bidrar till musikens helhet kan skönjas. Från minsta underliggande slaginstrument till knastret och bruset som understödjer det atmosfäriska och brutalt undersköna.

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På torsdag i nästa vecka intar de scenen på Under Bron i Stockholm (Skanstull, gratis entré) (ALVAR presenterar) med sin första livespelning någonsin, tillsammans med en utvald skara av artister och DJ’s. Mellan 17:00 och 03:00 så kan man även se Celldöd och Dissociō Modus Trāns live – medan de som DJ:ar kommer att vara Mattias Anger (Complete Control Productions, Kollaps Records) och Daniel Jonasson (Covenant, S.A.W.).

Man kan hittills bara lyssna till ett smakprov av vad som komma skall, men det som ni kommer att få höra kommer att sätta sig i hjärnbarken omgående – vilket lindrar ens begär för fullständiga låtar, någorlunda. Lyssna här nedanför via Soundcloud.

Exclusive Premiere: Rude 66 – Under Cover Of The Night (feat. Beta Evers)

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Multi-faceted electronica artist Rude 66, or Ruud Lekx which is his real name, have been creating music under his moniker since the mid 1990s, out of the Netherlands. Other off-shoots like the leftfield techno alias Modulate, with the release “Dreams” on SSR Records in 1993, have been less common. He’s not an artist that has many alter-egos, only two which include the aforementioned, and Jagdstaffel 66 – the acid house and techno freak out – which he went by on a release in 2012 called “Starfighter“, which was put out by Crème Organization. Oddly enough, or maybe reasonably enough, Rude 66 has been his main name since 1994 when he released his first release “Untitled” on Bunker Records, which spanned onto three different releases with the same name, birthing a compilation of all his untitled tracks on the same record label – simply titled “Compilation“. Since his discography is rather long, I thought I would include his trilogy of notable albums that came into place after his numerous untitled releases from 1994-1997. It includes his first album “The Devil’s Highway“, put out on Silver Recordings in 1997, to “De Machine Des Duivels” put out by Bunker Records, and his latest full-length album “Sadistic Tendencies” which was put out on Crème Organization in 2008. Since then, and during his trip through atmospheric acid house, to leftfield techno, from modern electro-funk, to electronic wave and everywhere in between where you’ll find electronica, he’s also released numerous EPs and Singles throughout the years. He’s also done a split with Johan Agebjörn, Sally Shapiro and Elitechnique – which was titled “Spacer Woman” and came out on LoEB in 2008. But that’s not because I’m writing this, when it comes to his discography, it’s because I’ve had the honor to exclusively premiere a track of his latest mini-album titled “12¨“.

This 12¨-vinyl is his latest release since other mini-album “The Kill“, which was put out on Bordello A Parigi in 2014. The difference from that mini-album is that he’s teamed up with Beta Evers and Sololust on the A-Side of the release, with the tracks “Under Cover Of The Night” and “Stars Get Hurt“. Leaving only the B-Side for himself to put out “Mutual Assured Destruction” and “Radio Peace and Progress“. Since I’ve been collaborating a lot with Enfant Terrible and Gooiland Elektro – the sub-label – I’ve gotten my hands on the first track on this release. Which is “Under Cover Of The Night“, best described as a fantastic combinations of arms between Beta Evers sole proprietor Brigitte Enzler and her vocal talent, together with the ingenious acidic electronic body music-ish crossover electronica that Ruud Lekx deliver with Rude 66. A fantastic endeavor that will make you seek out the darker side of yourself, floating into the sound-scape by the sheer hypnotism of the landscape of sound that wrestles for space around you. I’m proud to be giving you the track “Under Cover Of The Night”, for exclusive streaming, only featured on Repartiseraren. Even though the track has been out for a couple of days now, the article is also up. Enjoy it a second time and rejoice.

Artikel: En insikt i Judas Cradle Recordings punkiga byk! [Avsnitt I]

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Introduktion: Lukinzine, Farsot, Judas Cradle Recordings?

Det började i Göteborg, med Lukinzine och andra åtagande som Ramon Calvo hade tagit på sig. Egentligen är det en rätt så brokig resa, med många timmars arbete som följd, när han bestämde sig för att mer och mer avvika från Lukinzine som sådant. Inte helt och hållet, men det märks att hans webb-zine har fått samsas med andra ting. Bland annat så startades skivbolaget Farsot av både Ramon Calvo och Richard Ingemann (Mosher.se). Utöver det skivbolaget så har även Judas Cradle Recordings funnits ett tag, och det verkar som att bägge skivbolag tillhör varandra på något sätt, med den enda skillnaden att Farsot huserar We Live In Trenches, med det enda släppet på det skivbolaget – som är albumet “Life Crisis“. För övrigt är det Johan G. Winther (Scraps Of Tape) som skapat den fina logotypen som Judas Cradle använder sig utav.

Ett släpp som kom i början av 2014, som var ett samsläpp mellan det redan sedan länge etablerade skivbolaget La Familia Recordings, som huserat välkända akter så som Wolfbrigade, Martyrdöd, Hårda Tider, Ursut, Herätys och Disfear – för att nämna några stycken. Tillsammans, så släpptes “Life Crisis” som ett begränsat vinylsläpp, med 375 svarta vinylskivor och 150 vita vinylskivor. Sammanlagt uppgår de i 525 exemplar. Utöver detta så verkar det som att Farsot och Judas Cradle Recordings huserar under samma tak, åtminstone när det gäller den distribution som Judas Cradle Recordings har. Så låt oss nu gå vidare.

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Exclusive Premiere: Joy Before The Storm – Quiet Past (Re-Mastered)

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The year is 1985. A year, and specifically a decade, where synth-pop and minimal synth are thriving – all over the world. Making it a quite pleasant decade for those whom indulged themselves with music from these genres. I’m keen to mention the US as one of the more underrated bastions, delivering solid acts like Near Paris, and their one and only EP titled “Visions” that was released on Imperial Records in 1985. This group got revived through Medical Records, who in 2013 released a limited edition, self-titled LP that included never before heard tracks. A compilation, if you will. I’m primarily talking about Near Paris as an exquisite and rare exception to the more popular groups and solo-project around this time, because it’s relevant to what I’m about to bring you. But it’s also relevant in a world where re-issues and re-releases seem to be popping up here and there, like mushrooms through the ground. As I mentioned, Medical Records is simply one bastion, in a fragmented world where these record labels serve as a beacon – and perhaps also a guide to how you’re supposed to do it – when re-releasing and re-issuing records. Especially if we mention those rare gems of the past, which people haven’t really heard about until they pop up on these labels. Dark Entries Records is another one of those beacons, mostly catering to your more experimental and dark needs, as they’ve recently pumped out Lassigue Bendthaus, Crash Course In Science and Psyche – the latter being one of the more melodic exemptions.

But there are more labels out there who do these kinds of things, from every genre that you can think of, to every genre you’d never think of. Bunkerpop is one of those more unknown labels that have up until now re-released the Coïtus Int. gem from 1982, “Dead Excitement E.P.“, which I reviewed over here. They also gave the same treatment to Null and Void, putting out material by them which was recorded in 1980-1982, under the guise of “Possibilities (Discoverable Thoughts)“. Unfortunately, Bunkerpop seem to have taken a minor hiatus since then, but they might be coming back very soon – you can always speculate. Another re-issue label that I wanted to mention is Domestica, which is one of those labels that release a lot of interesting, and different stuff from the past. This Barcelonian mammoth that seem to be steaming onwards like never before, have just recently re-released Son Of SamThe Collapse Of Ancient Funk (1984-85 A.D.).” – under the name of “The Collapse Of Ancient Funk (Vol​.​1)“, Little Nemo and their “Past And Future“-album, but also the Barcelonian synth-group Terminal, with their album “La Vida Es Como Un Gel”. There are many more labels that could’ve been included, but I’d like to mention them a little off-hand over here, instead: Emotional Rescue, Anna Logue Records, Infrastition Records, Avant! Records (both new and old), and many – many more. But these record labels are basically those that I’ve appreciated the most.

Well, we should continue. What we’re about to give you is an exclusive track from a forthcoming re-issue of the album “Silence Ever After” by Joy Before The Storm. This album was originally written, recorded and mixed in 1984 at High Noon Studios. Spanning in between dark wave and synth-pop, delivering both the cheesyness that I so adore, but also the seriousness and complexity that a lot of these crossover acts had, especially those that were rare – as is the case with Joy Before The Storm. Together with the independent record (and re-issue) label Atemporal Records, we’re prepared to give you the track “Quiet Past” from this album. This track is a re-mastered version of the original, and is featured on “Silence Ever After“, the re-issue that is going to be the fifth release on this record label, and that is going to be released in the very near future. You can stream this track down below and check out Atemporal Records, for more information. Joy Before The Storm was Matthew Anderson, Kevin Kaulson and Dan McKay.

Label: Atemporal Records – Cat#: AT-005 – Artist: Joy Before The Storm

Exclusive Song: Quiet Past (Re-Mastered) – Title: Silence Ever After (RE, RM) – Format: Limited Edition 12¨ LP (320 copies)