Harvesting #14: Transistor Sphere / DRAMA! / Eoster

Without further ado, Harvesting returns with a smattering noise. It’s been about a year since you last saw something in regards to this. This time covering releases from artists that have self-released their albums, to artists whom are already on a label. Everything from Transistor Sphere, an angst-pop artist crossing into cold wave territory, to DRAMA! a Hungarian avant-garde minimal electronics outfit being released on KHK Tapes. To Eostre, whose debut-album will soon be put out in full by the label Soft Corridor Records. Three enigmatic artists with their own perks. Three artists that are going to be covered here in Harvesting number 14. The fourteenth edition of Harvesting, to date. Scroll down and read it all.

a1517745545_10With a total of fifteen songs, the artist Transistor Sphere moves and shape-shifts into whatever that pleases him for the moment. Electronica is moving swiftly from a rather calm intro, to an angst-pop assault. Clashing beats, hypnotic atmospheres and cherished dark rhythms make this moment such a bliss. A moment that can be endured, a moment that is packaged in between fifty minutes and a little bit more. Lurking transmitters wire you to this experience, that moves somewhere in between the minimalism of minimal electronics, to the fast-paced rhythms you’d otherwise hear in a breakbeat or drum’n’bass track. The album itself has a titled that describes the feeling you get when listening to it: “Disintegrated“.

Here’s where everything dissolves and at the same time it’s a trip into the utmost space of the soundscapes. It can change for a minute, a few seconds – or a little bit more – from the most beastly fast-paced running electronica – to the utmost minimalistic heresy. The melodious content of this album is not something you should underestimate. His eloquent touch with sincere electronics overshadow the whole darkness that is repetitive in the atmosphere of the tracks. It feels organic and it doesn’t feel soulless at all. Low-key beats bounce upon the samplings, the noises that can be heard are briefly swooshed away in favor for something else. Clearly a multifaceted release that goes in between ominous music, deliberate angst-pop with baselines as deep as the blue sea, to the cold wave and in touch with the emotional content at hand – to a degree that is probably not heard when listening to other artists. It’s also clear that he’s influenced by Friedrich Nietszche‘s philosophy to a degree, in regards to the quote on his page: “The future influences the present just as much as the past“. A mysterious artisan at his craft, an interesting antagonist at our hands. Listen to Transistor Sphere‘s album “Disintegrated” below.

khk03_The cacophony doesn’t stop here, as DRAMA! steps up to the plate and run amok. This is a Hungarian artist whose participation in music ranges back to a compilation this artist was featured on, which was “Central Heating” – a compilation crafted by the same label he’s on – namely KHK Tapes. It was released back in 2012 and even though this release, which is his first self-titled, was released in 2013 – we thought of featuring it anyway. He’s got a rather out-of-the-ordinary industrialized landscape of sound which is carefully crafted together between the boundaries of industrial and tape music in the first hand, and minimal electronics as the underlying motor that is pulling this workhorse forward. Forwarding public domain information from the United States in the shape of sound, mixed together with a regular rhythm make a rhythm out of the samplings that he’s borrowed from these domains. This results in a pretty weird but rather analogue experience that will drive you insane sooner or later. A lot of the tracks don’t even make it over three minutes, which makes them a lot shorter then what is expected. The release is compromised of thirteen tracks and the further in you go, the stranger it gets. Noise gets on top of the chain, whilst an almost power electronics sound is dominating throughout – resonating with the scrappy sound of the electronics. Once you go in there, you’ll come out with bad German soap operas that have been used for sampling purposes, but also dubbed things that you can’t really find the source for – unless you’re interested in that stuff. The whole ordeal you’ll have to endure when listening through it feels like a re-cycling of sound. All the primitiveness that can be heard is overlapped with interesting build-ups, heavy and noise synthesized sounds, charred beats that would make you suffer if you had to listen to it even longer. The format is well-thought out, since you can only endure it long enough until the repetitiveness kills you on its own. But mind you, it’s not boring to listen to, at least. You can listen to the whole self-titled release down below, from KHK Tapes bandcamp.

a2596681461_10Glad you’ve read this far. Lastly, we’ve got an experience for you that you’ll probably find rather enjoyable. Eostre is a solo-project that combines the ingeniousness of minimal electronics with the rather rugged sound of ambient and experimental electronics. A formula that the man behind the solo-project, the Belgian man Sébastien Schmit (K-Branding/Service Special) have made his own. Harnessing the monotone vocals that he puts out on the smooth surface of the tracks. A rather interesting paradox between the smoothness of the ambient in the tracks with the rather rugged beats that hit you hard in your neck. This is his debut-album under this moniker and it’s titled “They Were Made Of White Cloth“. Put out by the label Soft Corridor Records. What’s interesting with the two tracks made available on this release is how they change from being a rugged trip into the unknown, hitching a smooth ride – but ending with bubbling electronica and then simply fading out.

Just to change to rather ethnic beats with the other track made available, a kind of middle eastern and/or oriental touch with a sullen synthesizer that almost reminds you of that calm, but oriented emotional saxophone sound that gets played rather frequently in films from the 1980’s. Especially if these films are Action-films. It is clearly noticeable that the different instruments form an intricate rhythm together, that is being based upon underlying rhythms that soar through the dampened landscape of sound. Well, tough luck, because Sébastien is a drummer when push comes to shove. This is also noticeable in how he form the different patterns for the rhythms. Everything goes dancing throughout the soundscapes of these two tracks. Not much more can be uttered about this release, since all tracks have not been made available. It’s a joint release between Soft Corridor Records and Alt. Vinyl, and is going to be put out on the 20th of April. The cover illustration was created by Jess Pauwels, and the photography was taken (and designed) by Julien Lambrechts. Listen to and stream this release down below, from Soft Corridor Records bandcamp.

Invisible Guy and Beläten presents: Strife and Fight – an Invisible Guy mixtape!

Strife-and-Fight

Visions and Light, Shadow Rite and now – Strife and Fight. These three names have something in common, and that is the fact that they’re a part of the same mix tape-series. Beläten and Invisible Guy go way back. They’ve worked with each other for a number of years by now, delivering something extra for the readership of this blog-zine each time. Years have gone, and this is one of the few things that really remain. Last time, when “Shadow Rite” got introduced, the mixtape was mixed by Th. Thot of Beläten, himself. It got received very well with everyone, and everyone else. This time, Invisible Guy himself steps up to the plate to show that he can mix, too. Well, since it’s only a mixtape and not a mix, you might get the picture. The difference about this mixtape, from the last, is the fact that everything you’ll hear here constitutes the six recent releases on Beläten and nothing else. That means that every release from 2014 so far, have been jam-packed into this mixtape. You’ll get familiar with Grand Mal x, Dmitry Distant and Distel – from the first tape-batch – and Blitzkrieg Baby, Sebastian Melmoth and L’Avenir – from the latest. The name for this mixtape will be “Strife and Fight“, because I’ve strafed and fought my way when doing this mixtape. Pick up your strength, fire off a right-hook right into solar plexus, because now you’re a fighter. Fight your way through and make yourself a name. Throughout militant martial pop, pseudo-something with a large dose of psychedelia, clamoring electro with a hard-hitting hammer to a beat, weirdly X-files related synthesizer delight, angst-pop in its finest manifestation, and finally – melodious and angelic synth-pop.

This is not from Sweden with love, nor are we in Bromley, if you catch my drift. This is from Sweden with pure hate, from Sweden whose dark forces assemble once again. We’re ready for a fight and we’re willing to take it, we’re ready to strike. If you’re weak, this is not the recommended remedy for you. Since this is a rather harsh mix-tape, this is rather a remedy for all those passive souls that reside within Sweden. Yes, you know who you are and you might find this serum useful. Find yourself in this Fight Club-esque hommage from Beläten and Invisible Guy, strictly put together by Invisible Guy himself. You know that we mean business when this happens, because he rarely, if ever – touches it and brews himself. Now it’s brewing over and you’ll have to endure it with your strengthened skin. Take a jab at me, but before that, start this mix-tape by hitting the “play”-button. You will live through it.

Strife and Fight – this is the end of the line. Invisible Guy hasn’t gotten to mix these former mix-tapes that took the name of “Visions and Light“, to begin with, and “Shadow Rite“, to end with. He’s since then taken the torchbearers’ torch and lit the flame himself. Th. Thot is no longer in charge, he only deliver the supplies. This time, we’re getting down to business for real, and we’re giving you strictly Beläten-related material. Invisible Guy has mixed in Distel with L’Avenir, Blitzkrieg Baby with Dmitry Distant, Grand Mal x with Sebastian Melmoth. We’re meaning it with “Strife and Fight“, your guide to manliness – and your guide to catching the drift – with a right-hook right to your solar plexus. This is war. Buy your discount bundle of the three latest releases here, from Beläten. Or buy them individually over here.

Strife and Fight – An Invisible Guy Mixtape

1. Sebastian Melmoth – Catching Up With Morrison
2. L’Avenir – Fallout
3. Blitzkrieg Baby – Broken Child
4. Dmitry Distant – Gates Of Aeon
5. Grand Mal x – The Crossing
6. Distel – Onde
7. Blitzkrieg Baby – The Swine Supremacy
8. Sebastian Melmoth – Black September
9. Dmitry Distant – One Night In Train
10. Grand Mal x – A Sudden Portal
11. Distel – Plants
12. L’Avenir – An Empty Day
13. Blitzkrieg Baby – Those Who Could Not Fuck, They Kill
14. Sebastian Melmoth – Presley Honey
15. Grand Mal x – Late Night Call
16. Dmitry Distant – System Control (The Exaltics Remix)
17. Distel – Vortex
18. Blitzkrieg Baby – Loop
19. Sebastian Melmoth – Prosopagnosia (The Rlf Mix)
20. L’Avenir – Fallout

Exclusive Premiere: Distel – Japanese Eyes

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Just when you thought it would’ve ended, it just started. You might’ve anticipated this, but for a later release, not up on Invisible Guy at all. They take it to a whole other level with their grainy angst-pop, filling it to the brink with menacingly sublime chants, rumbling baselines and shockingly heavy drums. That’s how it goes when the unorthodox mixture of minimalism, noise and dark wave gets taken to a whole other level. Welcome to the world of urban Tokyo meets the feudal Japan. Knitting together both in one atmosphere, making it even more fascinating as you try to decipher what it’s all about. You get the interpretative prerogative, lent to you all so easily by Distel. Yes, it was them whom you’ve all waited for so long. Since their release; “Puur“, on Enfant Terrible last year, you couldn’t hold it together and simply wanted some more. At least a sign of life, a sign of a new release on the horizon. That’s what you all got, but you didn’t get to hear anything.

It was only one label who could proceed to take the task of releasing their tracks after their presence on Enfant, and who could it be if not: Beläten. As this cassette is the third of the three cassettes that are being released in the near future, this atmospheric and sublime entrance into a new world of Distel, is pleasantly arriving so you can enjoy them when they’ve taken off their masks. Their stature in the catalog is of the runic inscription, and rune itself, Peorð (). It denotes the sound “p” in the Elder Futhark runic alphabet, and goes by the aforementioned name in the Anglo-Saxon rune poem. It does, however, not appear in the Younger Futhark. The meaning of this word in Germanic could be referring to: “pear-tree”, in the context of “recreation and amusement”. Well, I’m here to tell you, it might be amusing and interesting to get something new out of this duo, but it sure as hell doesn’t display anything amusing. No, its cloudy, sublime and horrifying. But its mystique is what makes you wander into their world all to much, just to have the trap-door shut right behind you. It’s enigmatic and sullen.

But enough of the talking, let’s get to business. Invisible Guy is proud to give you the track “Japanese Eyes” from the forthcoming release “Ultra2012“, that is being put out there for the world by Beläten on the 31st of January. This is probably one of the most anticipated releases, since you folks got a hold of the news that it’s actually coming out. One thing must be told, and that is that five of the tracks are interpretations on Mekanik Komando, and only one is an original track by them. This is because they wanted to pay homage to the Ultra movement of the late 70’s and 80’s, all this was encompassed by the first of four Ultra2012 events that were held in Dutch cities in 2012. If you know this background-story, it would be good to check out “Japanese Eyes” by Mekanik Komando, an electropunky and funky trip that was unleashed with the “It Would Be Quiet In The Woods If Only A Few Birds Sing” album, from 1981. But you now get the opportunity to stream and listen to the interpretation that Distel made of the track “Japanese Eyes“, as you can stream it exclusively from Invisible Guy and we hope that it will make your day a little bit better, or worse. Well, get on to it, and read more about the background of it down below!

Label: Beläten

Cat#: Peorð

Artist: Distel

Exclusive Song: Japanese Eyes

Title: Ultra2012

Format: C24

January-2014

After last years’ magnificent Puur LP on Enfant Terrible, Distel return with a cassette featuring five interpretations of Mekanik Kommando and one original composition, all made for the first of four Ultra2012 events held across four Dutch cities in 2012.

Performers were asked to in some way pay homage to the original Ultra movement of the late 70’s and early 80’s, and Distel choose to do so by covering five songs from Mekanik Kommando’s debut LP »It Would Be Quiet In The Woods If Only A Few Birds Sing« from 1981. The closing original Onde was used as a sort of theme song for their performance at the event in Nijmegen.

In the hands of Distel these songs are transformed from jittery white-boy punk-funk into menacing, pulsating krankheitspopmusik Robotic voices call from deep beneath the layers of thundering bass. Euphoric rave arpeggios pierce through the din of squealing analog synthesizers and urges the listener to dance, or at the very least move in unison.

Through the Japanese Eyes of the mysterious figure behind Beläten