Thee Showcase [#8.4]: Juventud Juché and Gardland!

379909952-1Well, we’re not even done here, so what am I doing? I’m searching far and wide, collecting some of the bands that needs to be showcased. Time for Thee Showcase, this time finding its way to southern latitudes. The Spaniards from Juventud Juché are featured this time. Their latest 7¨ is estimated to have been released in 2012, but they’ve put it up on bandcamp this year. It’s titled “Discos Walden” and is a messy upbeat, rhythmic annihilation that deserves a slap on the wrist for the most post-punkish thing since the 80’s. It’s probably one of the more fitting releases to have the Spanish language included on a release. Since I haven’t really bothered to listen to any Spanish post-punk, this is as close as I get. The melodies are simply outrageous in their own right. A hint of garage can also be found, in the middle of everything, making the vocalist sound crazy and confronting. In any universe where the baseline and the riffs don’t collide, will make a new planet that is deserving of the name “planet“. Both the rhythmic jig of Juventud Juché is celebratory at best and continuous at worst. The kind of energy they bring to the table is filled with suspense and it will make you rock out in your own bedroom, making a fool out of yourself. It also makes me want to learn Spanish. The crossover between garage-punk and post-punk is simply awesome, garnering the tight baselines of post-punk and the distorted landscape of garage-punk in the one and the same, tight category. Also, the variation of their sound-scape, when it comes to how they lay it out – is simply astonishing. It can go from extremely upbeat, to almost downbeat and annoyingly repetitive. But at least there’s a point to it being that, which is to withhold more of the same and bring out more of the other. Featuring songs ranging from “Gibraltar Español” to “Ainhoa“, originally released in 2012 on Gramaciones Grabofónicas, also put out on bandcamp at the 22nd of February.

1369216745-1My, oh my, do we like analogue over here? Yes we do. Remembering the true days of real shit. No, just kidding, but it is kind of nostalgic. The duo featured here is Gardland, a pair of techno-crazed Australians. He’s currently put up his self-titled debut-EP “Gardlands“. Something that’s great with analog sounds is that you get a deeper, more crisp and broadened sound. It doesn’t sound the least plastic and the dynamics between the booming base drums and the more experimental sounds in the mix sound terrifyingly close. It actually reminds you about a lot of the more classic techno, or at least of that which has seen its years. The chaotic environment, the stable and pumping beat, equipped with the analogue vitality that is Techno – can only go one way, which is the successful way. At least if you think about it in a musical perspective. Everything is connected, through and throughout, with a more subtle change within the sound-scape that totally ridicules everything that’s gone through a filter. Here’s some real stuff that will make you shake, that will make you appreciate the sound. It slowly progresses into an abomination, a rolling ball which you cannot stop and a coherent landscape in which those addicted to the genre, can get their fix. I must admit that I rarely write about this genre, their predecessors or anything related, but I can always appreciate a good round of Techno if I ever feel one. My eardrums aren’t bleeding, but they’re shaken because of the experience. Much of it is thanks to the equipment, but the work with the sound-scape is the key. Now, all I can hear is: “Repetition is the key“, which is a line from the track “1767“. Quickly, you’re focused with all your senses and you feel them activating, just to captivate the experience alone. It might be repetitive, but there are things that keep you listening to it and there are things which you simply can’t let go from. Probably some of the better Techno I’ve heard for a while. Tracks featured on the EP are “Decalogue“, “1767“, “Plague Bearer” and “Haut Mal“. Released by himself on the 28th of February. It seems to be totally D.I.Y.

Review: TSTI – evaluations

Pretty sharp, analogue and complex for being a bedroom project. Like a throwback from the wonderful 80’s. First song “In Loving Memory” is a wonderful example of what could be done with a little bit of synth-pop and dark wave, without a forced etiquette and instead of trying to push a false sense of genuine feelings. This is what happens when you combine the finest elements of both genres, and when you have put so much effort into the music that it stays afloat without doing a thing. There’s a sense of deepness in this song that provokes the most profound feelings from inside. A sense of loneliness and a sense of love, reeks out of the holes from the sound-scape. Unable to keep it in, it spreads throughout and just stays put on the edges as they touch you slowly but with much sincerity. The synths are a huge part of that experience, which goes from angelic to dreamy, back to the darker spheres in no time spent. I cannot grasp how a bedroom project could do such an impact, as I was expecting a much more amateurish and foolish approach to the wonders of those genres he’s involved with.

Needless to say, my expectations met their match, beyond my own grasp of the reality at hand. The slow-paced synths, the bombastic elements and the utter and sheer dedication that can be felt – have moved me inside and I’m not the same again. As for the next track “Queen of Swoons“, I can feel the more industrial-oriented rhythms and controlled environment that enrich the sound even more. A totally different track at hand, but with the same sympathetic vibe noticed within. I have a slight feeling of a totally new thing, but at the same time one or another remnant from times past. If Fad Gadget had combined his ingenuity with the synth-pop serenity of a band like Depeche Mode, put into a time-capsule and moved to the 00’s, their own brainchild would be TSTI. A weird sense of a predecessor being influenced by a progenitor, all mixed down into their counterparts, but also what doesn’t separate them. It’s like everything is falling to place, with immense speed and just leaving it up to me to decide how this wonderful piece of art should be described. Not being able to grasp it fully, not being able to describe it properly. But I surely want do my best. The third track “Pull The Animal’s Teeth Out“, begins with a rather heavy intro and is masked with a nice synth-line.

When I think about it, the vocals of S. Smith are both soothing and entrancing at the same time. The whole mood of the songs feels like something Andrew Eldritch would’ve put together if he was working with S. Smith. With that said, I think the utterly complex structure of the song deepens the mood of the sound-scape as a whole and surely grasps the 80’s melodic content by the balls. No, it’s not being castrated, but it’s being squeezed out and used as a resource for the wonderful path of laying both a concrete and emotional landscape of different harmonies, synths and the wonderfully arranged drums. Fourth track “Love & Truth” is about as minimalistic as its gotten on this album, a much harder edge to both the synths and the sound-scape at hand. Somewhat decorticated to fit the means of the analogue wonders that he is working with. It reminds me of the old-school EBM-styled beats that were prevalent in that genre in the 80’s but also later on in the 90’s. Not only the fixed and repetitive synths with an unorthodox touch to it, but also the more pop-oriented and dreamy synths that works like a wonder when combined with the vocals. As I move on to the fifth track, which is titled “Acquaintance“, the harder beats get even more room in the mix. It feels like a religious experience and it feels like Smith is opening the door for me and welcoming me into his adamant home. Whilst it at the same time feels sinister and include some damn fine synths that together produce this kind of sound-scape that feels like its about to fall down below because of the pressure on it.

The progression of it is totally out of my own realm, its as if he’s got a bunch of different alter-egos that sit with him and compose these songs. One where the darker side of him is allowed entry and one where the “lighter” side is inducing the sound-scape with a refined reality. Even though it very much feels like its a well-produced piece, at the same time it feels like something beyond the borders of music. I can sense a lot of hard and cold nostalgia revealing itself here. Sixth track “Match To Friendship” is enough industrial-influenced to make me spew out nuts and bolts. At times it feels like its borrowed from indie pop, but at the same time, there’s a harsher sense to the sound-scape than that. There are synths in this sound-scape that I wouldn’t hear anywhere else than in a great 80’s song and it feels like its built up by those synths. When I listen through it, again and again, I feel like he’s borrowed a lot of influences from genres that might not be that apparent. I feel like there’s a more commercial vibe to it, but on the other hand, I don’t believe that it would be accepted there. Much because of the hard-knocking beats and severe punishment you get to endure whilst listening to it. But it’s all worth it. However, when the seventh track comes on, there are a lot of things that are about to change. It’s titled “This Damage Is Magic” and it feels more like a knock away from a harsh newstyle EBM song than anything else.

Blend it with the finest you can get in future-pop, add up some nasty elements to it and you’ll have a hybrid of VNV Nation and something else. I’m not really sure what that would be, but it surely would be something angelic. I love how the synths start sounding like dolphins communicating below surface, even though its almost a few seconds. I believe that is the essence of S. Smith, he can both be very complex at hand but when you think about it – he’s also managed to keep a basic edge to what he’s doing. Now things get even more out of hand, as I tune in to the eighth song “Because You Told Me To“, which sounds like something the cat dragged in. I’m confused now, very confused. From a mighty synth-pop and extravagant dark wave album, to a techno-oriented house-hybrid? There’s a lot of 303 in this mix. I feel Acid House, but its not even close. However, he’s close to the 80’s, which is when it had its peak. But I don’t really know, I can’t really dig it. Even though the sound-scape is perfectly fine, the softer side of it is just so malplaced amongst this 303-vibe. Well, enough with this, now its time for the last track: “In Loving Memory (anti-707 mix)“, which is basically the first song but without a 707, which means “no drums for you, sucker“. Personally, I think this song doesn’t really take on the first song, but fine, it sounds pretty good anyway. I feel like there’s something missing and I feel like the drums should be there. However, this is one of the greatest albums of the 00’s (2000’s), that I’ve heard and I’m going to bookmark his bandcamp. Thank you for such a fantastic experience, never stop making art.

You can and should buy his limited edition CD over at bandcamp, but if you don’t want to, you could buy the digital download-only album. Do also listen to his album below.