The launch of Repartiseraren!

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Invisible Guy no longer exists. It was a time of joy and careless fun. Since I started this blog-zine back in early 2011, I had no idea that it was going to get even near as big as it is now. My ambition was to drive this blog-zine as a hobby-project of my own, just so I could spend some of the vacant time that I had back then. What was a hobby began when I interviewed different local bands in Sweden, from Norrland to Skåne, Stockholm to Blekinge and everywhere I could find any interest. Later on, in 2012, it evolved into the podcast that I had in regards to me covering a lot of the punk and hardcore-scene, since I was interested in it and D.I.Y. The birth of Swedish Punk and Hardcore came with my ambition to start this podcast of my own, which aired for five episodes before I trashed the idea completely. I really had no time to be mailing to people, getting them to participate, since a lot of the time went to administrate what I could find and try to get people to get back to me. That’s really not a fun thing to do, especially not when you need to fill a podcast which could be everywhere from an hour to eight hours long. I wanted it to be impressive, I wanted it to be underground and I wanted to hear their stories – play some music – basically have my own radio-show in some kind of way. Since then, everything has been running smoothly. It’s been getting better and better, so I decided to invest money in artwork which I bought from the wonderfully talented James Licht – the man behind one of the most promising labels – namely Die Song. There’s where Invisible Guy changed into Repartiseraren, bringing a rather small legacy to its grave, but not an insignificant one. It meant a lot to me, and it brings a lot of pain having to let go of it, but I feel like it will always be there in some kind of way. Repartiseraren was just a breath of fresh air, the beginning of something new, an extension of what Invisible Guy once was. I am proud to say that it has gone very well and I am thankful of everyone’s support of this blog-zine. It means more then you could ever imagine.

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One of my newly attained friends Magnus Gyllenswärd, whom is most known as Övervarning, mailed me about a week ago or so. I’ve always been fascinated with his music, since I found one of his releases on Bandcamp while sifting through everything. His mail couldn’t have come in a better time or place. Since he notified me about his release being out, but not on a label for the moment, I asked him if I could put out a couple of tracks from it. He agreed with that and here we are – letting his tracks represent the shift from Invisible Guy to Repartiseraren. It was an honor for me to pick out the tracks from his newly produced album, tracks that I found fitting to the general theme of launching this new platform and bringing new light to the old. Therefore I chose the tracks “Avstånd, beskrivning, befogenhet” (Remoteness, description, remit), “Visst påverkas man av sådana händelser” (Surely one is affected by such events) and “Högt ovanför den tomma kyrkan” (High above the empty church). Every title had such an apt description to what happened in between that transition, what the transition actually was, and the music itself felt so refreshing. Like being born again, getting a new chance. These tracks were taken from his latest release “Förberedelser / Åtgärder“, which is currently not on any label, and is exclusively available in the shape of the three songs that I picked myself. Stream and listen to them exclusively, and celebrate the new dawn with Repartiseraren!

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Exclusive Premiere: Inneres Gebirge – Do Der Sumer Komen Was

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From neo-folk to neo-classical, these years have been formative for different acts within those genres and beyond. One act in particular that stuck in my mind was Inneres Gebirge, with their clear historic anchoring and fierce folk-music that transcends into different genres as well, but also into neo-folk territory. This German act released their first debut-album in 2012, which went by the title of “Schlafender König“, which spans from The Early German Romantics, to virtually different times in an historic context – that can be connected to their works. Most notably the musical interpretation of Uwe Lammla’s poem “Schwarzer Wein“, from the track with the same name, taken from the book by the same poet – which goes by the name of “Idäisches Licht“, from 2006. Which is interesting, since they grab what they can from different time-periods, with the main focus on Germany – all the time. This is, however, just a brief story taken from what you’ll have to buy to discover – that is buying their CD.

They were also a part of Heathen Harvest’s compilation “Samhainwork I“, with a track that isn’t related to the CD at all, namely “Holy Thursday“. The compilation was released in 2012, the same year, but later in October. Members of Inneres Gebirge are also closely related, or part of the band Aeldaborn. What makes them unique is what has been said before, it is that they interpret different parts that create a unique view, into the folklore that exists and the folklore that they bring to life within their music. I must say that this is only a brief explanation of what they’re about, and where they are coming from, which is just scratching on the surface. The members of this group are Sepp Funkel, S. Dante, Thomas Lueckewerth, Ron Con Koma, Mari, Michael Weinstein and Fräulein Stein. Sepp Funkel and Thomas Lueckewerth are also a part of Aeldaborn. More of the background can be found in this much revealing review by Heathen Harvest’s reviewer Sage, over here.

So, with that said, let’s give you what can be given. In a collaboration with Deggial Records / Edition Roter Drache, the Invisible Guy brings you the track “Do Der Sumer Komen Was” from their aforementioned release “Schlafender König“. I am doing this because of the fact that there weren’t many tracks up by them to begin with, so why wouldn’t there be some kind of collaboration to bring you a track? Well, here it is for your joy and pleasure. I picked the track I find to be the best on the album. Therefore, you can now stream the track down below and go buy the CD from them if you like what you are hearing. Always support something if you’re interested in it, or want to know more.

Exclusive Premiere: Distel – Japanese Eyes

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Just when you thought it would’ve ended, it just started. You might’ve anticipated this, but for a later release, not up on Invisible Guy at all. They take it to a whole other level with their grainy angst-pop, filling it to the brink with menacingly sublime chants, rumbling baselines and shockingly heavy drums. That’s how it goes when the unorthodox mixture of minimalism, noise and dark wave gets taken to a whole other level. Welcome to the world of urban Tokyo meets the feudal Japan. Knitting together both in one atmosphere, making it even more fascinating as you try to decipher what it’s all about. You get the interpretative prerogative, lent to you all so easily by Distel. Yes, it was them whom you’ve all waited for so long. Since their release; “Puur“, on Enfant Terrible last year, you couldn’t hold it together and simply wanted some more. At least a sign of life, a sign of a new release on the horizon. That’s what you all got, but you didn’t get to hear anything.

It was only one label who could proceed to take the task of releasing their tracks after their presence on Enfant, and who could it be if not: Beläten. As this cassette is the third of the three cassettes that are being released in the near future, this atmospheric and sublime entrance into a new world of Distel, is pleasantly arriving so you can enjoy them when they’ve taken off their masks. Their stature in the catalog is of the runic inscription, and rune itself, Peorð (). It denotes the sound “p” in the Elder Futhark runic alphabet, and goes by the aforementioned name in the Anglo-Saxon rune poem. It does, however, not appear in the Younger Futhark. The meaning of this word in Germanic could be referring to: “pear-tree”, in the context of “recreation and amusement”. Well, I’m here to tell you, it might be amusing and interesting to get something new out of this duo, but it sure as hell doesn’t display anything amusing. No, its cloudy, sublime and horrifying. But its mystique is what makes you wander into their world all to much, just to have the trap-door shut right behind you. It’s enigmatic and sullen.

But enough of the talking, let’s get to business. Invisible Guy is proud to give you the track “Japanese Eyes” from the forthcoming release “Ultra2012“, that is being put out there for the world by Beläten on the 31st of January. This is probably one of the most anticipated releases, since you folks got a hold of the news that it’s actually coming out. One thing must be told, and that is that five of the tracks are interpretations on Mekanik Komando, and only one is an original track by them. This is because they wanted to pay homage to the Ultra movement of the late 70’s and 80’s, all this was encompassed by the first of four Ultra2012 events that were held in Dutch cities in 2012. If you know this background-story, it would be good to check out “Japanese Eyes” by Mekanik Komando, an electropunky and funky trip that was unleashed with the “It Would Be Quiet In The Woods If Only A Few Birds Sing” album, from 1981. But you now get the opportunity to stream and listen to the interpretation that Distel made of the track “Japanese Eyes“, as you can stream it exclusively from Invisible Guy and we hope that it will make your day a little bit better, or worse. Well, get on to it, and read more about the background of it down below!

Label: Beläten

Cat#: Peorð

Artist: Distel

Exclusive Song: Japanese Eyes

Title: Ultra2012

Format: C24

January-2014

After last years’ magnificent Puur LP on Enfant Terrible, Distel return with a cassette featuring five interpretations of Mekanik Kommando and one original composition, all made for the first of four Ultra2012 events held across four Dutch cities in 2012.

Performers were asked to in some way pay homage to the original Ultra movement of the late 70’s and early 80’s, and Distel choose to do so by covering five songs from Mekanik Kommando’s debut LP »It Would Be Quiet In The Woods If Only A Few Birds Sing« from 1981. The closing original Onde was used as a sort of theme song for their performance at the event in Nijmegen.

In the hands of Distel these songs are transformed from jittery white-boy punk-funk into menacing, pulsating krankheitspopmusik Robotic voices call from deep beneath the layers of thundering bass. Euphoric rave arpeggios pierce through the din of squealing analog synthesizers and urges the listener to dance, or at the very least move in unison.

Through the Japanese Eyes of the mysterious figure behind Beläten

Spotlight: Life Is Pain – Born, Suffer, Die…

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Missing out on two years ago is not such a big deal. But once you find something that simply attaches itself into your mind, you want to show it to the world – no matter how many years on its neck it might have. The largely existential project Life Is Pain is the solo endeavor of an unknown character from New York. His influences range from Arthur Schopenhauer‘s stance on suicide, which is that it’s not wrong at all or born out of cowardice, since; “They tell us that Suicide is the greatest piece of Cowardice. That Suicide is wrong; when it is quite obvious that there is nothing in this world to which every man has a more unassailable title than to his own life and person“. This project also harkens from the depths of atmospheric dark wave, to the less intriguing blend with melodious cold wave – to the more exciting metamorphosis from experimentalism to post-punk, goth and minimal synth. Even though the more melodic parts make you shy away from the project, the absoluteness of the darkness that can be derived from the absolutely soul-wrecking topics that are brought up make you turn the other cheek and face it towards “Born, Suffer, Die…”, which is the two-tracked release that is talked about above. Featuring the two tracks “Unassailable” and “Sindrome“. Unfortunately, he hasn’t released anything else then this, but this might help spark interest in what he’s been working with before. Stream it down below.

Interview with Light House!

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Light House is a two-piece group that is hard to categorize music-wise. They stumble upon each other as their intricate music is filled to the brink with cold wave, minimal synth, industrial, dark wave and everything in between. The core members of Light House have always been Chris Relyea and Dawn Sharp, with occasional help from Brooks Blackhawk (Atriarch) and their new addition to the gang – Frank Burkard, whom you’ll know more about if you read this interview. It’s one of those groups that you simply set your eyes on and couldn’t turn away for a moment. When I started listening to their music, I was simply hooked. Since 2011, they’ve released everything from their self-released 7¨ in that year, to their “2012 / WISHBONE” 7¨ which was released in 2012. To their first EP ever, titled “In Their Image EP“, which was first released by Freee Records and later on, in 2013 – re-released by Mannequin Records. Here, in this interview, you’ll get to know a little bit more about their forthcoming album, how they evolved, what Light House means to them, their thoughts about their own music, and much more. Read this or leave it be, but I bet it won’t leave you unshaken.

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Some questions for Image Of Life!

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Image Of Life is an interesting person, whom you may or may not know, but that’s irrelevant. According to himself, at least. He heavily indulges in what he calls “nihilist pop”, a sub-genre which he himself has coined. Not much can be said about him, but the overtly misanthropic and nihilistic music that he makes. The first album that appeared was a self-released cassette titled “Last Letters From Leper Colony“, which featured ten songs, all written between the years of 2010-2012. After being featured on Kristopher Reinshagen’s list in “favorite musiks of 2012“, on the ninth place – he delved into further anonymity. Until he surfaced once again, now to be featured on the Chondritic Sound roster, as he released a double-single in 2013, by the name of “Weight Loss In Wartime / Walking In The Dark“. This original minimal synth purveyor is not to be known, but we shall make sure to know him a little bit better. Therefore, I asked him a few questions, ranging from his albums, his person and a little bit of everything you’d ever want to know about nihilism.

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Some questions for Michael Thiel from Weyrd Son Records!

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Michael Thiel is the son of the man that was Snowy Red, whose name was Marcel Thiel. With the first release coming out from his newly started label, Weyrd Son Records, which was a tribute to Snowy Red by a multitude of synth-artists – his label became a part of what might be a future legacy. This son of Belgium is the sole proprietor of the label, and he makes everything work. Since he shaped the idea for the label back in 2012, it started to become a real label when the compilation “_ever Alive – a tribute to Snowy Red” was released in May, 2013. Which had the catalog-number WyS-001. I’m all about this label, so I sent Michael some questions about it, hinting on future releases, the symbolic nature of the first compilation, the artists featured on his label – and much more. Tune in for another questionnaire, that is simply too great to be overlooked. At least if you ask me, but I hope you’ll enjoy reading it.

Your label is pretty new, since it’s only been around since the late December of 2012, from what I’ve noticed. The first release, the tribute to Snowy Red, seems to have been a huge success. What was it like in the process of starting your label?

– Indeed. I officially announced the creation of Weyrd Son Records around late December 2012. A full tribute album to Snowy Red already crossed into my mind a while ago, but it was in the morning of a day in April that I clearly stated; that from that day on, I would work seriously on that first release. I had a few band names in mind, but for some reason I thought it would be quite hard to find a record label that might be interested to release a records with so many “new bands”. I didn’t want anyone to impose any bands or artists I wouldn’t work with, so I immediately thought I would do everything by myself and create my own brand to have a full control of that project.

How hard was it to gather all these artists for this huge compilation?

– I would be lying to say it was a piece of cake doing this. The most difficult part was to be sure I would receive all the tracks on time, which didn’t happen. It takes a lot of energy to give everyone the same motivation that you have yourself. They were of course motivated, but as long as the project is not 100% theirs, you can’t really expect for them to be involved in it – as much as you are. I mean, from that morning of April 2012, I decided to dedicate the biggest part of my time to everything related to the compilation. All those great artists have their own life, their own music and duty, it’s a normal thing – that they would put me on hold for some days. Plus, I didn’t want to push them too much, because I wanted them to take the time they would need to do what they do, in the best of ways. I guess I was just too confident about the deadline. Now I know what it’s like, for the forthcoming releases.

I’m just guessing that you are the brother of Marcel Thiel, so it seems pretty obvious why a tribute to Snowy Red was the first release. Was this a symbolic act for you in honor of his memory?

– Micky Mike was my dad.

It’s true, I didn’t want anything else to come out first on the label. It was at first pretty symbolic, indeed. I had already experienced such a workload three years ago when I was in charge with the art direction of the 5 LP boxset of Snowy Red that got released on Onderstroom. I insisted to do the artwork, and write the text for the whole booklet, so what I did was to get in touch with everyone who was close to my dad and worked with him; photographers, musicians, make-up artists, film makers, sound engineers, friends, etc. I then started to interview them all and my whole work was based on what I’ve learned about him. It was my way to get closer to my dad and to his music, I guess. I was only 4 when the first Snowy Red record came out. Of course I knew all the records by heart already, but I needed to have another approach towards the music and the artist himself. I used to listen to the whole discography while working on the designs and texts. It was pretty inspiring and I did exactly the same thing this time, with the tribute album. Every time I discovered a new facet of Snowy Red, and even more now when other people are playing it.

You’ve got a lot of artists featured on your “roster”, which is pretty weird since the label is very new. Since you aim on giving them total artistic freedom, would that be why they’ve joined up with Weyrd Son Records?

– I can’t really speak for them, but it’s true that I to give the artists 100% control of what they work on for Weyrd Son Records. I really think giving everyone the space they need is the best way to get great things in return. I would never tell anyone “hey, you should sound more like this or that”, or: “that voice part should better be done this way instead”. Who am I to pretend that I know better than themselves, in what their true musical personality is?

Are you the only guy working with the label, and how much time does it consume from your everyday life?

– I’m officially the only person involved, as I’m the only one making the decisions in the end. But there are a few people around me like friends, my sister and my girlfriend, who are giving their opinion – or simply giving me advice. But there’s always one person that is constantly around that I speak a lot with. I would say that it helps me to understand what people are waiting for, what kind of things they would expect from a label. I don’t really buy everything he’s saying, but at least it’s really interesting to hear someone else’s point of view.

Since you’ve already revealed what you’re going to release on your label, both for me and Radio Campus, I was wondering if there’s something you’d like to cover about these releases that haven’t already been said?

– So far, I haven’t really been talking about the fifth release, which I know is some kind of event. It’s about a fresh new band out of the LA-scene. Their name is High-Functioning Flesh, consisting of the duo Susan Subtract (Branes), and Gregory Fronczak. They released a four-tracked tape four months ago and the whole synth-scene in LA went into a mini-blast. I immediately fell in love with them, and I’m counting them in amongst my future projects, which is truly my biggest pride.

Have there been any other labels that you’ve taken influence from, when you decided to start up your label?

– I guess that every single label that has a true and strong personality has or had an influence on me. They are most of the time pretty different, musically speaking, to what I tend to work on – but things like visual communication or artistic coherence are always good lessons to get influenced by. Sometimes I listen to every single artist or record that the label is showing to the world. My interest for a label is sometimes as strong as for music itself. To speak more about the ones that impacted me greatly, I would say that the following three, were those responsible of influencing me: Ideologic Organ (a sublabel of Mego), Sacred Bones Records and Sige. I truly love their artists, but I’d say that it’s pretty far from what I’m working with, musically. But I admire how coherent they are, and the quality of their products, design and inventiveness.

What kind of artists and bands have gotten in contact with you, besides those that are already confirmed?

– Actually, Marburg, the Polish band that is on the tribute to Snowy Red, have gotten in contact with me. There have been a few, mostly doing synth music, of course. But the one I got the biggest interest for was a band doing some true rock’n’roll music. It kinda reminded me of POP 1280, which I ‘m quite a big fan of. I hope I won’t sound like an asshole, but I don’t really like the exercise of being contacted by bands. The reason is that most of the time people aren’t really fitting my vision of what I want to work on. But if I like their stuff, I’m always ready to help.

As a celebratory gesture, you also released the mixtape “The Weyrd Dig Nasty” – celebrating the release of your label. Did it live up to your objective of the label?

– That mixtape was a way for me to put something out that was related to the label, with almost all the artists involved in the tribute, being featured on it. I wanted to give an overview of what Weyrd Son Records was all about, at least for the next few months of action.

When thinking about the label itself, how much response have you gotten from people since the start?

– I got lots of great response so far. Both from the artists I’m working with and people who have heard about Weyrd Son Records, that purchased the first release. Those great comments are making me thinking this was definitely the right move, and certainly the best thing I’ve ever started.

If you got to pick for yourself, what kind of artists or bands would you like to have on your label as a complement?

– Oh, wow. There are so many. There are awesome new bands that I really love, like BOAN, Ssleeperhold and Keluar..They’re all releasing their first record this year on great labels. But if I had to pick some names among confirmed artists, I would say Mushy, Lebanon Hanover and Scorpion Violente. Also, if we were to speak of other music that can’t be fitted into what kind of genres I deal with, I’d say that Chelsea Wolfe, who’s become my biggest musical crush since a decade ago. Or, if we move in the periphery, Eyvind Kang, if we’re going to speak of someone who blew my mind for the last two years.

Since your label is an independent one, are you going to expand in any direction or keep it smaller?

– I’m really not thinking about the possibility to expand. Plus, I think that it would be a mistake. I don’t want to loose a dimension that works, which makes me so happy right now. What I like here is that I have a privileged relationship with everyone, and with the bands. I also try to have a great contact with the customers by replying to every single request or remark. It takes time, but it gives me a really strong feeling to read that someone’s happy, from having a nice reply in the mail. I guess that only I will do for now. As long as I can do everything by myself, I will.

When you package things, they seem luxurious. Do you devote a lot of time to make it unique?

– I don’t think they’re so luxurious right now. But I guess what you could say is that I want them to be more and more luxurious. I’d like to make even more beautiful packages. But that takes so much time, because mostly I have to ship forty copies in a day.

The general aesthetics of Weyrd Son Records seem to be somewhat  industrially influenced, but also minimalistic. Where do you seek your inspiration for that?

– Graphic design is one of my biggest passions. I studied fine arts at school and I used to be really inspired by ancient Japanese art and paintings. Mostly because they use space and “visual silence” as a dialogue with forms and colors. The purity of a line, and of a shape is important to me, as they’re much like a signature. It’s also true that there’s something “industrial” about it, like the logo I created, and the colors I use. I want it to be something in between old fashioned and contemporary – but always classy.

Alright, it’s time to wrap up. What’s going to happen in the coming months?

– The next six months will be pretty busy, filled with lots of surprises. I just sent the artwork and mastering for the second release to the pressing plant, which is the Mushy/Meddicine split EP. It is a re-release on vinyl of the split tape that got released a year ago on Meddicine’s own label Sixsixsixties Records. Then there will be another reissue that will see the light of day around September. Which is the Linea Aspera 3-tracked EP. They released the amazing tape “II” right before they split up. It got sold out almost immediately and I was so pissed off that I missed it. The artwork of that one will be pretty special, but I won’t say too much about it now. The fourth release, that will actually have the catalog number WyS-003 is a three-EP boxset of White Horse. It’s the solo project of Ben Chisholm, who’s a full time member of Chelsea Wolfe’s band. He recently changed the name of White Horse into Revelator, but since he created all that music under the name of White Horse, we both agreed it was better to keep it under that name. This masterpiece in three volumes is titled “The Revenant Gospels”. Haunting and haunted.

I’ve know this music for two years now. I’ve been waiting for someone to release it, and for me to have the chance to hold a copy of it in my hands. But for some reasons that puzzles me, regarding the so outstanding quality of it, it never happened. But I’m ultimately happy that no-one did, because I’m so proud being part of this. And the fifth release will be a six-tracked EP from High-Functioning Flesh. The band that I was talking about earlier.

Listen to the tribute compilation for Snowy Red, that was released by Weyrd Son Records some time ago, down below.