Exclusive Premiere: Distel – Japanese Eyes

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Just when you thought it would’ve ended, it just started. You might’ve anticipated this, but for a later release, not up on Invisible Guy at all. They take it to a whole other level with their grainy angst-pop, filling it to the brink with menacingly sublime chants, rumbling baselines and shockingly heavy drums. That’s how it goes when the unorthodox mixture of minimalism, noise and dark wave gets taken to a whole other level. Welcome to the world of urban Tokyo meets the feudal Japan. Knitting together both in one atmosphere, making it even more fascinating as you try to decipher what it’s all about. You get the interpretative prerogative, lent to you all so easily by Distel. Yes, it was them whom you’ve all waited for so long. Since their release; “Puur“, on Enfant Terrible last year, you couldn’t hold it together and simply wanted some more. At least a sign of life, a sign of a new release on the horizon. That’s what you all got, but you didn’t get to hear anything.

It was only one label who could proceed to take the task of releasing their tracks after their presence on Enfant, and who could it be if not: Beläten. As this cassette is the third of the three cassettes that are being released in the near future, this atmospheric and sublime entrance into a new world of Distel, is pleasantly arriving so you can enjoy them when they’ve taken off their masks. Their stature in the catalog is of the runic inscription, and rune itself, Peorð (). It denotes the sound “p” in the Elder Futhark runic alphabet, and goes by the aforementioned name in the Anglo-Saxon rune poem. It does, however, not appear in the Younger Futhark. The meaning of this word in Germanic could be referring to: “pear-tree”, in the context of “recreation and amusement”. Well, I’m here to tell you, it might be amusing and interesting to get something new out of this duo, but it sure as hell doesn’t display anything amusing. No, its cloudy, sublime and horrifying. But its mystique is what makes you wander into their world all to much, just to have the trap-door shut right behind you. It’s enigmatic and sullen.

But enough of the talking, let’s get to business. Invisible Guy is proud to give you the track “Japanese Eyes” from the forthcoming release “Ultra2012“, that is being put out there for the world by Beläten on the 31st of January. This is probably one of the most anticipated releases, since you folks got a hold of the news that it’s actually coming out. One thing must be told, and that is that five of the tracks are interpretations on Mekanik Komando, and only one is an original track by them. This is because they wanted to pay homage to the Ultra movement of the late 70’s and 80’s, all this was encompassed by the first of four Ultra2012 events that were held in Dutch cities in 2012. If you know this background-story, it would be good to check out “Japanese Eyes” by Mekanik Komando, an electropunky and funky trip that was unleashed with the “It Would Be Quiet In The Woods If Only A Few Birds Sing” album, from 1981. But you now get the opportunity to stream and listen to the interpretation that Distel made of the track “Japanese Eyes“, as you can stream it exclusively from Invisible Guy and we hope that it will make your day a little bit better, or worse. Well, get on to it, and read more about the background of it down below!

Label: Beläten

Cat#: Peorð

Artist: Distel

Exclusive Song: Japanese Eyes

Title: Ultra2012

Format: C24

January-2014

After last years’ magnificent Puur LP on Enfant Terrible, Distel return with a cassette featuring five interpretations of Mekanik Kommando and one original composition, all made for the first of four Ultra2012 events held across four Dutch cities in 2012.

Performers were asked to in some way pay homage to the original Ultra movement of the late 70’s and early 80’s, and Distel choose to do so by covering five songs from Mekanik Kommando’s debut LP »It Would Be Quiet In The Woods If Only A Few Birds Sing« from 1981. The closing original Onde was used as a sort of theme song for their performance at the event in Nijmegen.

In the hands of Distel these songs are transformed from jittery white-boy punk-funk into menacing, pulsating krankheitspopmusik Robotic voices call from deep beneath the layers of thundering bass. Euphoric rave arpeggios pierce through the din of squealing analog synthesizers and urges the listener to dance, or at the very least move in unison.

Through the Japanese Eyes of the mysterious figure behind Beläten

Interview with Tony Drayton of Kill Your Pet Puppy!

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The first Kill Your Pet Puppy, released in the borderland between 1979-1980.

Kill Your Pet Puppy is a zine from London, England. It’s got a lot of history to be backed up with, and might actually be called legendary. One of the men behind it all, or should we call him the ‘main man’, Tony Drayton – left his former zine Ripped & Torn to create this one. As the first issue emerged in 1979, it featured; Bauhaus, Crass, The Mob, Sex Gang Children, Southern Deathcult, The Associates, The Ants and Alien Sex Fiend. Including articles, in a range of topics from “Magick and Anarchy”, “In Praise of Stupid Songs”, “Gay Punks”, “Sid Vicious Memorial Day”, joined by “issues” such as feminism, squatting and the occult. Well, this was the first number of KYPP, and more were to come. It got distributed by Joly MacFie from Better Badges, and came out in six numbers from the years of 1979 to 1983. Even though countless things can be said about this zine, and its continual twelve writers from the joint group called ‘The Puppy Collective‘, whereas some of the members were; Alastair Livingstone, Kilty McGuire, Cory Spondence, Jeremy Gluck and Val Not-A-Puppy – nothing can be said better than by the man himself; Tony Drayton. Therefore, I sent a couple of questions to him, which turned out to give a lot of answers, as each answer tells a story in itself. So, I hereby welcome you to read the pretty long interview with Tony Drayton, about the Kill Your Pet Puppy-zine and things along the line of 1979-1983.

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My New Fascination (Special Ed. 2): Null And Void – Possibilities (Discoverable Thoughts)

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This is a special-edition of My New Fascination which is directed at the wonderful guy who owns Bunkerpop. It will contain one of two reviews, one of the re-issued version of Coïtus Int. first release “Dead Excitement E.P.” but also of Null And Void and their brand new release of material recorded in between 1981-1982 titled “Possibilities (Discoverable Thoughts)“, which will be featured in Special Ed. 2. In this edition, I’ll go through the Null And Void release. You should support Bunkerpop by venturing over to his website and ordering these two gems, which will aid the label-owner in his quest of seeking out and preserving old gems.

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Invisible Guy recommends: 80s Gothic Rock – 1980-1981 (Part I)

I think it’s time to give you another treat, this time I’ll be recommending my favorite Gothic rock bands from the 80s. I begin with 1980-1981 (Part I) and then gradually move my way up throughout the years: 1982 (Part II), 1983-1984 (Part III), 1985 (Part IV), 1986-1987 (Part V) and 1988-1989 (Part VI). I’ll be continuing the fad of six different episodes and I’ll bid you my welcome into the world I knew and the world I’ve discovered and continually re-discover when I’m surfing the web. I want to give people another opportunity and to find out about bands and artists that they haven’t heard of before. Sometimes I occasionally sneak in a bigger band or two, but that’ll just be if the song is good enough. But by no means is this a top 30 of the best Gothic rock from the 80s, I’ll have to give you a top-10 list in the future of the Gothic bands that I think top my own list. I’ll also have some commentary beneath each clip as I had in the earlier parts that covered post-punk, mostly because it looks more aesthetically pleasuring and say something about the song or the lyrics. Let me take you into this world now.

You’re now entering Part I of the recommendation.

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Invisible Guy recommends: 80s Post-Punk – 1980-1981 (Part I)

I’ve been through with you in the 80’s now in about six parts, four parts were about new wave and two parts were about minimal wave. Now, because of popular demand (not really), I’ve decided to unleash the post-punk monster. It will feature six different parts, whereas each one of them will concentrate on important years. I will walk you through a decade of important music, I could almost call it the golden years of post-punk. The parts will go on like this: Part I, 1980-1981. Part II, 1982. Part III, 1983-1984. Part IV, 1985. Part V, 1986-1987. And finally: Part VI, 1988-1989. Hopefully you’ll enjoy this madness, featuring (mostly) obscure or unknown bands in this sphere. New for this recommendation will be that I have different commentaries under each video, some of them are humorous and others are not. It will cover the basic aspect of each video or text. Enjoy this one.

You’re now entering Part I of the recommendation.

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Invisible Guy recommends: 80s New Wave! (Part I)

Now that we’ve come this far, I’ll be showing off some must haves in the new wave region of the 80s. This serie will be in four parts, ranging from today up until Sunday. Featuring both well-known and obscure gems from the new wave past. Just so that you can have your obligatory reading and some well-needed tips for your music-pool. Not that you’d have a need to expand it after visiting Invisible Guy, but I’ll show you some things that you’ve never heard of but should’ve heard. Hopefully this will be a listening pleasure and hopefully you’ll find tips suitable for yourself. As I said in the latest episode featuring minimal wave: the numbers mean nothing.

You’re now entering Part I of the recommendation.

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Invisible Guy recommends: 80s Minimal Wave! (Part I)

This list is by no means my all time favorite minimal wave gems, but more a blend of both obscure and more well-known artists and groups from this dimension. The numbers mean nothing. Hopefully it will be ten great tips that people can be inspired by and find music they’ve never heard, but also help them get into the genre that is minimal wave. Not everything in the list may qualify as one hundred percent trve minimal wave, but I try to keep it as close to it as possible.

You’re now entering Part I of the recommendation.

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