Interview with Tony Drayton of Kill Your Pet Puppy!

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The first Kill Your Pet Puppy, released in the borderland between 1979-1980.

Kill Your Pet Puppy is a zine from London, England. It’s got a lot of history to be backed up with, and might actually be called legendary. One of the men behind it all, or should we call him the ‘main man’, Tony Drayton – left his former zine Ripped & Torn to create this one. As the first issue emerged in 1979, it featured; Bauhaus, Crass, The Mob, Sex Gang Children, Southern Deathcult, The Associates, The Ants and Alien Sex Fiend. Including articles, in a range of topics from “Magick and Anarchy”, “In Praise of Stupid Songs”, “Gay Punks”, “Sid Vicious Memorial Day”, joined by “issues” such as feminism, squatting and the occult. Well, this was the first number of KYPP, and more were to come. It got distributed by Joly MacFie from Better Badges, and came out in six numbers from the years of 1979 to 1983. Even though countless things can be said about this zine, and its continual twelve writers from the joint group called ‘The Puppy Collective‘, whereas some of the members were; Alastair Livingstone, Kilty McGuire, Cory Spondence, Jeremy Gluck and Val Not-A-Puppy – nothing can be said better than by the man himself; Tony Drayton. Therefore, I sent a couple of questions to him, which turned out to give a lot of answers, as each answer tells a story in itself. So, I hereby welcome you to read the pretty long interview with Tony Drayton, about the Kill Your Pet Puppy-zine and things along the line of 1979-1983.

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My New Fascination: Pauline Murray And The Invisible Girls – Untitled

Pauline Murray And The Invisible Girls – Untitled

This is, in my opinion, one of the best leftfield albums of all time. Even though it contains some post-punk and synth-pop too. All the rhythms and melodies fall in place and the vocalist Pauline Murray makes it one of the most powerful things I’ve heard recently. One of the most captivating songs on this 80’s album is “European Eyes“, where the moody and lingering baseline throws itself in the way for everything else. It has such a variety of songs that range within all those genres, but this song is certainly the most powerful one. When Pauline starts to wail in the chorus of the song, it makes me want to groove with it. It has such an alternative swing to it, despite being in one of the less alternative genres. A rough edge which smears the rest of the album and shatters glass on its way. But there are some songs that are worthy of contending that one, and I’ll tell you which songs.

The songDrummer Boy“, is like an abstract ballad. With a lot of interesting percussion and no-wave feeling to it. Accompanied by some repetitiveness, yet some balanced melody. It feels like it’s going to burst in any moment. Her vocals are spreading over the whole sound-scape and making themselves noticeable, even though the song is very modest at heart. Also, the song “When Will We Learn” reminds me of the high-school sweetheart. There’s something naive to it, and it recants the younger years. At least for me, since I get very nostalgic when I hear that song. With a high-pitched singing and I would say that this song is the ultimate contrast to “European Eyes“. The emotional melodies and everything is synchronized to make the best out of it. Whilst the song “Animal Crazy” drives you nuts with the awesome synth-pop melodies. A minimalistic piece of excellence, with arpeggio synths and carefully set baselines making it a mystical song to say the least. It’s also one of those songs that goes after a systematical pattern, and tries to make you dance at every beat it pulls off.

It’s one of those “must-have” records that you need to place in your vinyl-collection. Pauline Murray And The Invisible Girls pull this debutalbum off completely and it’s insane to think otherwise. Getting all you need, all the grooves and all the rhythms you’ve been longing for. Also, Pauline is a great vocalist with loads of potential and she’s made more than this. You should also check out her solo-album titled “Storm Clouds“, which is from 1989. It’s amazing that this particular album is from 1980. So listen through it and try to find a physical copy of it online.

Invisible Guy recommends: 80s Gothic Rock – 1980-1981 (Part I)

I think it’s time to give you another treat, this time I’ll be recommending my favorite Gothic rock bands from the 80s. I begin with 1980-1981 (Part I) and then gradually move my way up throughout the years: 1982 (Part II), 1983-1984 (Part III), 1985 (Part IV), 1986-1987 (Part V) and 1988-1989 (Part VI). I’ll be continuing the fad of six different episodes and I’ll bid you my welcome into the world I knew and the world I’ve discovered and continually re-discover when I’m surfing the web. I want to give people another opportunity and to find out about bands and artists that they haven’t heard of before. Sometimes I occasionally sneak in a bigger band or two, but that’ll just be if the song is good enough. But by no means is this a top 30 of the best Gothic rock from the 80s, I’ll have to give you a top-10 list in the future of the Gothic bands that I think top my own list. I’ll also have some commentary beneath each clip as I had in the earlier parts that covered post-punk, mostly because it looks more aesthetically pleasuring and say something about the song or the lyrics. Let me take you into this world now.

You’re now entering Part I of the recommendation.

If you wish to continue, click on the Continue reading button.

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Invisible Guy recommends: 80s New Wave! (Part IV)

Now that we’ve come this far, I’ll be showing off some must haves in the new wave region of the 80s. This serie will be in four parts, ranging from today up until Sunday. Featuring both well-known and obscure gems from the new wave past. Just so that you can have your obligatory reading and some well-needed tips for your music-pool. Not that you’d have a need to expand it after visiting Invisible Guy, but I’ll show you some things that you’ve never heard of but should’ve heard. Hopefully this will be a listening pleasure and hopefully you’ll find tips suitable for yourself. As I said in the latest episode featuring minimal wave: the numbers mean nothing.

You’re now entering Part IV of the recommendation.

If you wish to continue, click on the Continue reading button.

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Invisible Guy recommends: 80s New Wave! (Part III)

Now that we’ve come this far, I’ll be showing off some must haves in the new wave region of the 80s. This serie will be in four parts, ranging from today up until Sunday. Featuring both well-known and obscure gems from the new wave past. Just so that you can have your obligatory reading and some well-needed tips for your music-pool. Not that you’d have a need to expand it after visiting Invisible Guy, but I’ll show you some things that you’ve never heard of but should’ve heard. Hopefully this will be a listening pleasure and hopefully you’ll find tips suitable for yourself. As I said in the latest episode featuring minimal wave: the numbers mean nothing.

You’re now entering Part III of the recommendation.

If you wish to continue, click on the Continue reading button.

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Invisible Guy recommends: 80s New Wave! (Part I)

Now that we’ve come this far, I’ll be showing off some must haves in the new wave region of the 80s. This serie will be in four parts, ranging from today up until Sunday. Featuring both well-known and obscure gems from the new wave past. Just so that you can have your obligatory reading and some well-needed tips for your music-pool. Not that you’d have a need to expand it after visiting Invisible Guy, but I’ll show you some things that you’ve never heard of but should’ve heard. Hopefully this will be a listening pleasure and hopefully you’ll find tips suitable for yourself. As I said in the latest episode featuring minimal wave: the numbers mean nothing.

You’re now entering Part I of the recommendation.

If you wish to continue, click on the Continue reading button.

Continue reading