[13th] December: Acapulco City Hunters – Chaser

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Acapulco. A Mexican municipality but mainly a city, with as many as 234 communities—the most populous being Acapulco itself—with 673 479 inhabitants as of 2010, 85,25% of the people reside in the city. When counting the most populous cities except the main one, which are: Xaltianguis, Kilómetro 30, Tres Palos, San Pedro las Playas, Amatillo—the population combined account for 3,25% of the whole municipality, making it 25857 inhabitants in total, one starts to wonder where the rest of the 11,5% have gone. Where are the other cities? Are there smaller towns, considering there are so many communities? Questions remained unanswered. Here are when Acapulco City Hunters come in – it seems like they’re looking for an answer to that question. Maybe they’re straying away, in metaphors and synonyms, but they’re probably concerned.

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Or maybe, just maybe – we’ve been tricked by these con-artists. Making us think of Mexico as the main inspiration for their name, specifically related to the aforementioned questions, but it can also mean “Goin’ to Acapulco“—a track from “Dylan Basement Tapes” (1976), and I paraphrase from an outtake from Sid Griffin’s book “Million Dollar Bash” – from the source Shelton, Robert (1986)—music-journalist Clinton Heylin commented on its sexual innuendo: …featuring the usual debauched narrator, rambunctious harmonies, and euphemistic ribaldry according to Wikipedia. We can see how both sexual innuendos are fitted in a musical environment, influenced or not by either Sid Griffin’s book, Basement Tapes, or Mexico’s ‘lost’ cities and/or communities. A lot of the topics seem to suggest a strong influence of either everything – or simply one of the things listed above.

It’s interesting to note how Acapulco City Hunters is in plural, though other things like ‘his’ patchwork blog “Cosmic Beam“—suggests otherwise. Maybe since the Facebook-page is categorized as a “Community“, rather than an Artist-page, could reveal certain other possible theories. Pluralis it is because it suits the influences for ‘his’ project. If you get the reference we’re trying to make here, you’ve got a good sense of detail. The music-making dates back two years, from when he released “Haunted Bombai“—later to have a remix of the song by “DYSWIL“—filmed by Thomas Skrobek. Apparently a collective (now defunct?) named: “Negative Beat“. One of the actors’ names (Juliette Mellard) suggest that it really is a project born and based in France—collecting individual influences elsewhere.

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He’s also done a good rendition of; Marianne Faithfull‘s “Broken English“, originally released on LP in the UK 1979, via Island Records—now a sub-division to Universal Music Group. Though we’re not enthusiasts of Marianne’s intonation – we respect and understand such an immense contribution to England’s—and the world’s—music-life that she, and her discography have revealed throughout the years. With added minimalist synthesizers and a stripped-down not as extravagant atmosphere, Acapulco City Hunters make me like “Broken English“, and take the song for what it is – albeit in a completely new way. We must say that nothing beats an original, not even an original you’re not so delighted to hear in the first place, but they do a perfectly okay effort. We’re sorry to say that the bleep-synthesizer sound is too loud, which takes away part of the experience of listening.

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Now I won’t go any further into his discography, more than note that I have written about the split he did with Luminance, titled “The Cold Rush“. Sure, most of it sounds alike when listening through once in a while, but there are certain characteristics that Acapulco City Hunters had developed—that I heard when I had listened to it for a while. We prefer when he doesn’t overcharge on his ethnic vibes. When he keeps it nice and tidy, melodically ambitious and switches between different modes of electronica – is when he’s at his peak. This was exactly what he did with that release. Ironically enough he sings about evolution in “Magdalena” and evolved he has—at least musically. Recently, he also was featured in a track he did together with Luminance—on the “The Broken Window Theory“—a newly released compilation on Wool-E Records.

For Ljudkalendern he gives us, on the 13th December, unfortunately with a delayed article, a song titled “Chaser” – which might actually be the musical hunt for Acapulco. It seems to be something defining him, at the same time cranking up the tempo to maximum—making way for a spastic and erratic synthesizer-driven track. It’s a newly produced song for the purpose of this non-commercial collection – not compilation. We hope that you’ll take a bit of his musical concept with you in your thoughts after you’ve heard it—as delicate as it is forceful.

Exclusive Premiere: Bad News From Cosmos – Akira

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Ukrainian improvisers Andrii Hrachov and Iryna Bodnar are two-dimensional in concept; life and death, but three-dimensional when producing, musically; free improvisations, analogue synth commanders and bound to no certain genre. For them, it’s important to conjure a narration that binds together an otherwise escapist, avant-garde free-form of music with its’ static topic. Not to say that it necessarily means that the motive itself isn’t open for various interpretations – but just so the music doesn’t go too far away into abstraction. They themselves say it’s an “eternal experiment” – which makes you wonder if and when they’re going to finish experimenting? Maybe that’s the point with the project and when it ceases to exist—so does the experimentation.

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Bad News From Cosmos have been alive and kickin’ since 2010, releasing their first album in 2013 called “kongogumi“—which may be a reference to “Kongō Gumi” (株式会社金剛組)—Japanese construction company, and one of the oldest independent companies still existing in the world. The album artwork features a White Cherry Blossom (Sakura) – Japan’s national flower, which represents different aspects of Japanese history, but also their culture. Here’s where they seem to have started to wander into a certain topic, whether they like it or not—or maybe, just maybe it’s a reference to bloom (life) and withering (death)—could it be? We’re not sure, but it is a possibility due to their strict enforcement when it comes to topics, but not as strict as not being re-interpretable within the linguistic possibilities of the words.

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The same year when Autumn turned into Winter, “Fjord EP” was released on the Russian label Simphonic Silence Inside. Etymologically speaking, the references sprawl into obscurity, where it not for that we in Sweden have fjords and our brothers in Norway also have it—calling it: “Fjord“; (“a long, narrow inlet with steep sides or cliffs“). What comes to ones mind is the landscape of Oslofjord, a rocky landscape, an inlet (or fjord) which seem to metaphorically strew and divide the Islands Hovedøya, Lindøya, Nakholmen, Bleikøya, Gressholmen, and Langøyene on either the left or the right side. We’re not so sure if their reference is even close to ours, or if they simply had a different take on it considering the artwork’s display of a mountain. We would however wish it was true. Or maybe it’s just a reference to Norway and their highest mountain – Galdhøpiggen. We as Swedes would’ve wished for it to be Kebnekaise, so we could take pride in being interpreted by their avant-garde.

We didn’t want to delve any further into their releases, it’s just that those two in particular interested us more and that we would be writing much longer, not getting to the main point of this article, if we were to cover everything. Which we’re not interested in. However, they’ve released three albums since the aforementioned releases and they’re titled (not in order): “Laid down to earth“, “Kids of the Soviet Tree“, and “Turquoise Hearts“—their latest release so far, on Amok Recordings. Wouldn’t it be nice if we actually got to the point now? Yes. So let’s begin.

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French label Anywave Records recently created a sub-division, or sister-label if you will, composed of a palindrome of Anywave—called Evawyna. The purpose was to have a label for digital releases only. So far Heather Celeste have gotten her single-track release “Austere“, re-released on on Evawyna. In this article we’re focusing on the second release, the continuation of Bad News From Cosmos, their forthcoming album “Pearls for Guttiere“—by now down below the sea, if we reference the artwork. Here they’ve taken “nippon-pop” from what we think is their debut-album (“kongogumi“), polished it and put it as the sixth track on this coming album. The mellowly sounding and beat-orientated experimentation relax our senses—feels like diving into the sea, snorkeling, seeing the beauty of the fabric in the ecosystem—and all the wonderful creatures living there. As it is sung in Japanese, we’re vaguely reminded about “Kaneda’s Theme“—from the by now legendary Akira 『AKIRA』(アキラ)(1988) film’s soundtrack, due to the sound but also the name: “Akira“. We’re proud to be streaming it exclusively from our blog-zine and we hope it fascinate you as much as it did for us.