Exclusive Premiere: Distel – Japanese Eyes

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Just when you thought it would’ve ended, it just started. You might’ve anticipated this, but for a later release, not up on Invisible Guy at all. They take it to a whole other level with their grainy angst-pop, filling it to the brink with menacingly sublime chants, rumbling baselines and shockingly heavy drums. That’s how it goes when the unorthodox mixture of minimalism, noise and dark wave gets taken to a whole other level. Welcome to the world of urban Tokyo meets the feudal Japan. Knitting together both in one atmosphere, making it even more fascinating as you try to decipher what it’s all about. You get the interpretative prerogative, lent to you all so easily by Distel. Yes, it was them whom you’ve all waited for so long. Since their release; “Puur“, on Enfant Terrible last year, you couldn’t hold it together and simply wanted some more. At least a sign of life, a sign of a new release on the horizon. That’s what you all got, but you didn’t get to hear anything.

It was only one label who could proceed to take the task of releasing their tracks after their presence on Enfant, and who could it be if not: Beläten. As this cassette is the third of the three cassettes that are being released in the near future, this atmospheric and sublime entrance into a new world of Distel, is pleasantly arriving so you can enjoy them when they’ve taken off their masks. Their stature in the catalog is of the runic inscription, and rune itself, Peorð (). It denotes the sound “p” in the Elder Futhark runic alphabet, and goes by the aforementioned name in the Anglo-Saxon rune poem. It does, however, not appear in the Younger Futhark. The meaning of this word in Germanic could be referring to: “pear-tree”, in the context of “recreation and amusement”. Well, I’m here to tell you, it might be amusing and interesting to get something new out of this duo, but it sure as hell doesn’t display anything amusing. No, its cloudy, sublime and horrifying. But its mystique is what makes you wander into their world all to much, just to have the trap-door shut right behind you. It’s enigmatic and sullen.

But enough of the talking, let’s get to business. Invisible Guy is proud to give you the track “Japanese Eyes” from the forthcoming release “Ultra2012“, that is being put out there for the world by Beläten on the 31st of January. This is probably one of the most anticipated releases, since you folks got a hold of the news that it’s actually coming out. One thing must be told, and that is that five of the tracks are interpretations on Mekanik Komando, and only one is an original track by them. This is because they wanted to pay homage to the Ultra movement of the late 70’s and 80’s, all this was encompassed by the first of four Ultra2012 events that were held in Dutch cities in 2012. If you know this background-story, it would be good to check out “Japanese Eyes” by Mekanik Komando, an electropunky and funky trip that was unleashed with the “It Would Be Quiet In The Woods If Only A Few Birds Sing” album, from 1981. But you now get the opportunity to stream and listen to the interpretation that Distel made of the track “Japanese Eyes“, as you can stream it exclusively from Invisible Guy and we hope that it will make your day a little bit better, or worse. Well, get on to it, and read more about the background of it down below!

Label: Beläten

Cat#: Peorð

Artist: Distel

Exclusive Song: Japanese Eyes

Title: Ultra2012

Format: C24

January-2014

After last years’ magnificent Puur LP on Enfant Terrible, Distel return with a cassette featuring five interpretations of Mekanik Kommando and one original composition, all made for the first of four Ultra2012 events held across four Dutch cities in 2012.

Performers were asked to in some way pay homage to the original Ultra movement of the late 70’s and early 80’s, and Distel choose to do so by covering five songs from Mekanik Kommando’s debut LP »It Would Be Quiet In The Woods If Only A Few Birds Sing« from 1981. The closing original Onde was used as a sort of theme song for their performance at the event in Nijmegen.

In the hands of Distel these songs are transformed from jittery white-boy punk-funk into menacing, pulsating krankheitspopmusik Robotic voices call from deep beneath the layers of thundering bass. Euphoric rave arpeggios pierce through the din of squealing analog synthesizers and urges the listener to dance, or at the very least move in unison.

Through the Japanese Eyes of the mysterious figure behind Beläten

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