Review: Plymouth Fury – Vaudeville

coverHard-hitting, able to riff you out of the world, your classic new rock types. Making it a joy to present themselves through sound, is the band Plymouth Fury, featuring the members Worzo, Will and Stephane Kurdijaka. These fellow from France start off with the song “Balone De Noche“, which hits the roof instantly. With its rough and dirty rock textures, calling to the roots of the working class rock’n’roll that have outlived their own hegemony. The intro is simply an astonishing work of craftsmanship, where the drums sheer power and the naive riffing doesn’t let you anticipate what is to come. A shade of grey, lay over a span of colorful and enigmatic warmness. When they rip it off, all hell breaks loose and the classical touch of rock’n’roll ‘riffery’ goes a long way to prove itself vital. Even though it’s mostly a sign of the revival, or a new wave of rock’n’roll, they surely pave the road for even more simpleness within the same genre. No compromises, just straight up and down, rock music. Without the strained touch of modernization, constrained to a gritty – almost noise-rock-esque edge.

When you need more, tuning into the second song “The Basement” – is simply enjoyable. Here, we find a more mellow sound, still furiously generous within the rockin’ department. It becomes fairly obvious, with the name and all, that everything is rooted in a 60’s nostalgia turned on its head. Towards a more sinister and heavy sound, which leave no moments to be dull. Generally, the overtly concealed vocals, beneath a gritty layer of distortion – doesn’t turn you off the slightest. Because the sound-scape packs such a furious punch, that you’d simply ignore most of the lyrical content anyway. Which is a thing in itself, to decrypt with your own ears. This, in turn, puts a lot more focus on the instrumentation – rather than the singer. He might not be at the forefront, but they sure as hell balanced it off well. Cojones is the least he’s missing and the raspyness of the vocals, the sheer energy of him terrorizing your ears, is indeed a fraction that can’t be limited to the instrumentation at large.

Next up is the song “Ajo y Agua“, which seems to be a little bit more timeless. In the sense that the music is like an endless desert. Imagine an hourglass, pouring out sand throughout the top to the bottom. This is what it feels like, if you’d enter a state of forceful timelessness. As the time is against you, they pour down the most wicked baseline that could ever be featured in an intro, at you. Contributing to the overt reality that is about to face you, because you’re in a race against time – whereas one can only be the winner. Therefore, the energy is further energized, the riffs are intensified and the vocalist is completely insane. Insanity has struck, as you need to move fast, when the drummer strikes the last crash. Switching in between two states of minds, one more subliminal and the other one a total eclipse of every rock’n’rollers dirty heart. Tough shit, because this is complete grittiness, combined with the virtuoso that is Plymouth Fury. It signifies the last letter in their name, and it also makes it pretty clear that it can’t get more engaging and fierce.

Tumbling through the weeds, entangled in post-punkish fervor, comes the song “Maelstrom Libido“. The mayhem that has been wrought upon the listening ears, are nothing in comparison to this annihilating piece of strung up, rock’n’roll, flirtation. It will have you dancing with one foot in the post-punk category and the other in the pure rock’n’roll. Even though its crushingly beautiful, there are calmer moments within the song which lead up to the pathway of the totally flipped out sense of what you’d love to hear. Nothing can be more energized than the top of Plymouth Fury’s excellence – as they speed away with your senses, leaving you nothing more than an inspiring tone ringing in your ears. It’s telling that they’re convenient enough to freak out on the riffing, but keep it tempered until its unleashed in its full splendor. The symptomatic relationship between the rhythmic and considered, with the furiously speedy renegade sound. A probable cause for tight drums, distorted baselines and a hell of a temper.

With that said, here’s where everything changes. This seems to be the line between their harder and speedier stuff, as they slow down immensely with the song “I love you Leigh“. Which sounds more like a ballad, oriented with an almost indie rock sounding atmosphere. Filled to the brink with emotions, sincere lyricism, continued with a bombastically backing sound – together with a singer whose voice never ceases to amaze. It doesn’t matter in what situation he uses it in, whether it be furious rock’n’roll, or britpoppy indie rock. Prolonged riffs, conquering the most stale hearts, breaking the wall between different nuances in each genre. For this cannot be seen as anything else than a love song. Whomever this is dedicated to, should be proud over that particular fact. These boys are all about making it as pleasurable and ambitious as possible. It’s not even cheesy, because it hits deep. One probable cause would be the recognizable vein, in which they deliver tenfold. You’re dragged down, put up and then put down. Just to be built up again.

By a sly rock’n’roll rhythm that sets everything on its edge. The song “Tati“, is as short and stout by name, as the song itself. Here, you’ll get more accommodated in the drummer’s sphere, as he is the one delivering in this song. But not alone, of course. It feels as if he’s got the perfect rhythm matched to the perfect sound-scape. The laidback attitude that is flowing throughout the song, is paired up with the near funkiness of the spaced out guitar riffs. Some of it actually reminds you a lot of the earlier ska-punk bands, at times, from Sweden. With almost all attributes of that genre stripped, and laid into an overtly cheery but vague rock’n’roll stew. You can hear the hints of psychedelia also, but you’re not getting chocked with an avalanche of it. Even though it might not be the best they’ve shown of themselves, it’s certainly the standard formula of what they’re about. These pesky genrehoppers can’t just stay in one genre, they just have to mess around. That’s why you love what they’re doing.

Whilst the song “Black Ravines“, is a total embodiment of the stated words, in a vague sense. Here, you’ll get a roaring baseline, accompanying frictionless riffs that simply bounce of the walls and reverberate through the whole sound-scape. Wandering in the desert, concocting a sinful breakdown, with both melody and rhythm escaping each others grasp. But with cojones, and a sip of wonderful bourbon, you’d be able to join them on their journey. It touches the base of sludge, the tip of doom and a heavy dose of slowly-paced rock’n’roll wonderfulness. At heart, it’s a little bit bluesy, which isn’t a bad thing at all. You’re moved by each element of the song, as it builds up to knock things down. The breakdowns in the song are amazing, but they follow the basic portrayal of their sound in other tracks, as it usually does. However, it’s noticeable how much of the characteristics have changed, and how much that is actually static. Sometimes the static is a little bit too much and you grow tired of the sound. But, it’s almost always revitalized in one way or another.

Finally, at the end. This time the song is “The Snake“, which change their modus operandi. Instead of breakdowns here and there, building up, knocking down – it’s a steady trip that engages with all of the elements, just to unleash a battering of hurt, as everything is put in place. It feels like a closing track, and rightfully so, it is. Here’s one of those tracks you’d be singing along with your buddies, in an alcoholic frenzy. Something that should be done live, as the riffs strike with their monotonic wrath, making themselves a little bit more audacious, but at the same time tame. The drums in the end are simply magnificent, and in all fairness, it’s been a pretty good trip. When it comes to the album as a whole, there are some things that keep you from listening to it, but it’s more of a modern thing than anything else. If you look at it from another perspective, this album is surely one that would be steadfast and survive a couple of re-listens. However, I don’t know if it’s got anything above that. I hope so, though. Since it’s thematic and virulent, with an edge that is missing from today’s generic throwback rock’n’roll, Plymouth Fury are certainly heading in the right direction.

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